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    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
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    Interview with Corey Taylor No.3 / All Hope Is Gone 2008

    Four albums in and Iowan metal crew Slipknot are still terrorizing the mainstream. I have no idea how they ended up there: this is heavy, heavy stuff. But their latest disc, All Hope Is Gone, ended up at #1 on the Billboard charts, so they must be doing something right. With a renewed focus on his side, singer Corey Taylor is overjoyed at the album, his fans and recent victories like the aforementioned #1 and a headlining gig at Madison Square Garden. The masked men are hitting up Canada with some tour dates supporting the disc, so we took a minute to catch up with Taylor and all things knotty.


    What are you up to?

    I'm very, very tired. Today I got up at 6:45 because I had to take my son to school. I made breakfast and lunch for him, packed the lunch, took him to school, came home, cleaned the house, went and worked out, came back here, made myself lunch and now this is the second of two interviews I'm doing today.





    That's so not rock'n'roll.

    Well, neither am I. What are you going to do?





    So how's everything going in Slipknot land?

    It's going good, man. Everybody seems like they're in a good place, but you know how we are. That could all go away in a ten-second period. Just the fact that my phone's not blowing up with emergencies and panic attacks... I'm loving it.

    Now that All Hope Is Gone has had a bit of time to sit, how are you feeling about it?

    I go through these phases where I just have to put it on. At first, I would start with the front half; now I listen to the back half. It just sounds great. You know how that is, you get an album and fall in love with the first five songs and then you throw it on again and realize the last five songs are killer.



    With All Hope Is Gone, you returned to a bit more of a heavier sound. Did that just feel like the right thing to do?

    It just happened. We've never been the band that sits down and says, "We're going to sit down and make this kind of album." We throw shit at a wall and see what sticks, basically. With this album, everything felt dark. Everything felt really heavy.

    So would you say the album comes from a good place or a bad place?

    It's heavy, it's aggressive, it's dark, but you sound very positive about it.

    I think all great albums have that; it's all in the delivery. The lyrics I was writing were kind of both ways. I was raging on a political sense, and I've always had something against religion, but at the same time a lot of the stuff I was talking about started in a dark place but inevitably ended up in a positive place. I've always tried to put that in there, just saying,

    'Yeah, shit's fucked up right now but it can be okay and this is why and this is how.'

    So it's just something that I think is overlooked. We catch a lot of shit for being dark and whatnot but unless you're a real fan people miss the point where we're like, 'But it's alright. It's okay to be fucked up. It doesn't have to always be that way.' On this album, it was a great balance. That's what we finally found.

    And then the album goes to #1 on Billboard. What does that mean to you?

    It's very weird, man. When we were in the studio, I was the first one to say, "This album's going to be #1." Kinda just talking shit, but at the same time, you hope for it. You don't want to hope too much, but it's definitely one of those things on your list of "holy shit, this would be fucking awesome." So when it did go #1, it fucking blew me away. I was so fucking excited. I was really happy; I called everybody I knew and told them. I was very proud of that.

    Everybody talks about how it felt to win the Grammy. But fuck the Grammy. That's seven old people sitting in a room deciding whether or not they've heard of your band. For me, it's always been more about the albums, the gold albums, the platinum albums, people showing up at your show.

    That's your audience coming out and saying, "We fucking love what you do. We all do." The album was the same way; our fans gave that to us. We worked hard and we earned it but our fans gave that to us just as much as fucking SoundScan did.


    Speaking of the live show, you recently headlined Madison Square Garden. How did a band that sounds like you guys do that?





    That's a great fucking question, man. I don't even know, to be honest. I still trip on it. Leading up to it, it wasn't that big of a deal. I was like, "It's fucking Madison Square Garden, whatever.

    " Then you show up there and it's like, "Holy shit, it's Madison Square Garden." Seriously, when the curtain came up and we're standing there and I'm looking at the Garden and we had damn near sold it out, my jaw dropped.

    You couldn't see it because I was wearing a fucking mask, but it took me a second to get my shit together. I was nervous... I'm never nervous. It blew me away. When we finished the show, I came offstage, I just started balling. It was a heavy, heavy night for me. Nobody plays Madison Square Garden to make money, let's put it that way. It's very expensive to play. Someone told me it cost $50,000 just to turn the lights on in that place. So you don't really play there to make money. You play there because it's Madison Square Garden. It's a prestige gig. For me, it was just one more testament to how far we'd come.

    So you get offstage at Madison Square Garden and you're balling; how come?

    It was just big. I don't usually let shit like that get to me, but it was a big night, and it was a fucking great show. It was probably the best show we've ever had in New York. Everyone was just going insane. It sounded like everyone was singing every fucking word. It was just one of those golden moments. It was Maiden at Donington, it was Cheap Trick at Budokan, it was Aerosmith at the Texas Jam. It was fucking heavy.

    The grind of this gig can break you down and make you very cynical but there's moments like that that make you sit back and say, "I am living a dream. Are you kidding me?



    I get to do this for real?"

    So I was giddy. I was 14 in my room reading magazines, just going, "Fuck, some day." And that day was that day and it made me very happy; I went backstage and hugged all my bros. I was sick as a fucking dog that night too, that's what killed me. I had a sinus infection, I had an ear infection, a 100-degree fever and it just all went away.

    So where do you go from here though?

    You've done Madison Square Garden...

    Oh, it's gotta be downhill. Everything after this has just got to suck. [Laughs] In three years we'll be playing fucking clubs again, by my estimation. But honestly, I don't know. I definitely know where we want to go. Me and Clown have been conspiring for probably four or five months; we've got some ideas and some shit we want to do for the next album but... where do you go?

    You headline MSG and it's damn near sold out. Where do you go? I guess you just keep going.
    Something that's always cracked me up about you guys is you have these butt-ugly masks on and you look hideous and you have all these teenage girls screaming at you...

    Exactly! What the fuck is that? [Laughs] I love it, man.

    You must be laughing under the masks.

    You have no idea. I smirk damn near the whole time I'm wearing that fucking thing. If you could read some of the letters I get... it's un-fucking-believable some of the shit these people ask me

    When does grown men wearing masks become absurd?

    I'm not sure, to be honest. We probably could ask Gene Simmons. I don't know... That's a good question. As long as it means the same to us as it always has I don't think there's a time limit on it. For us, it's not about the bullshit; it's about the content behind it.

    At least that's the way it is for me. For me, it's always had much more of an artistic bent than anything else. So when it starts to become Chewbacca from Star Wars it's time to walk. As long as it still feels right and it means the same and it's not hokey and not bullshit. As long as we don't jump the shark, I think it'll be okay.

    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.jimdo.com
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 02-16-2018 at 10:04 AM.

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    What about Death Row and Bad Boy doing something together?
    That's as together as we can get. For money.

    What about getting together as black men?



    We are together as black men, they over there, we over here. If we really gonna live in peace, we all can't be in the same room, man.

    Because Yellow M&Ms don't move with green M&M's. I mean, you don't put M&M peanuts with M&Ms plain. You hear me?

    But we all black, brother...

    We all black and everything...but I'm not talking about division. I'm talking about realism. You don't hang with us. You live different than we live. We all brothers, but we don't all live the same. Even in a real family. I don't live with my mother, I don't live with my brother. We all come together for Thanksgiving we all get together for Christmas. If any of them call I don't wish nothing bad to the nigga. They call and say why don't we do a celebrity this this this in my neighborhood, I'm wit it.

    What about if they say they’re concerned about this hostility that’s out there that people are feeding into. Can you and Suge and Puffy and Biggie sit down?
    But that's corny. That's just for everybody else to be calm. For everybody else they could understand what's going on. They just wanna hear what the conversation is about.
    I know my life's not in danger. Suge know his life not in danger. I don't feel as if I gotta worry about them. They shouldn't feel like they gotta worry about me. Puffy wrote me while I was in jail. I wrote him back. I told him I don't got no problems with him.

    Even if there is no beef, don't you think it would be better to be clarified?
    What's that gonna stop if we sit down and have a talk. They know they can sit down. Niggas can start some shit and say whatever they want. Cause at the some point the Nation of Islam or somebody is gonna sit them down and we can make peace. That's why niggas is not being held responsible for the things that they do wrong. I don't want no problems, I don't want it to be fighting, I don't want no arguing, I just wanna make my money. You can't tell me I'm gonna sit down and hug and kiss niggas to make everybody else feel good. Straight up, there is no beef. If there was a beef niggas would know. *They know it ain't no beef. Puffy was at the fight [in Vegas, where Suge has a club].

    We in the Hip-Hop generation represent leadership. In the absence of us taking some stands, if anybody like you who's very visible, or Puffy or Suge saying, “There is no beef," then regular people who don’t understand that are gonna continue to think that there is a beef.
    I believe in fate.

    In Faith?
    Fate. Fate. I know niggas didn't want to sit down and have no conversation until Puffy started fearing for his life. I was in jail nigga. Living in jail when everybody was having this beef. One West Coast nigga in New York, maximum security prison. Nobody want to have no sit downs then. Had to deal with my struggle every day. Some shit like that.

    What did you learn from your experience? It was 11 and half months or something like that...
    I learned that fear is stronger than love. And no matter how much love I got for my peoples, man, if somebody else making them scared, my people gonna do me in. And I learned that a lot of people support me for just being me. And I have to give back. And a lot of people look up to me to give back. So I have to be able to give back. But I can't give back if I'm broke. So I have to be about my business and my money now. Before I wanted to talk and explain what I'm doing. I'm not doing that no more. Nobody's gonna understand me. I just came up with that. After reading what people was writing in VIBE. Ain't no need for me to make people try to understand me. I'm gonna be out here and do my music, do some movies. Try to give back to the hood any way I can. I'ma give out food every Christmas, I'ma give out turkeys every Thanksgiving. I'ma have a Mother’s Day program.

    I think you’re oversimplifying. 99 percent of the letters from readers supported you. A lot of people dissed the people who responded to you.
    I seen it, I read every VIBE. I had a subscription, man. Every article you did, I read every VIBE that came out. Then I started seeing this shit, I was like God damn. They can just say that. Puffy talking about, “If you a thug, you need to be a thug forever." And VIBE just printed it.

    I’m not accountable for what they did.
    It's not the same situation now where I can just speak. I don't care about them. It's because of them I'm invigorated and I'm rejuvenated to do what I got to do.

    You said you were moving away from...
    I'm striving for that. Every day I'm striving for that. Every day. You won't see me all up on TV getting high. I'm not making it where the kids... I'm not making it like I'm glorifying getting high. That's a hell of [a] motherfucking thing, to shake an addiction like that. But shit, I gotta do what I gotta do.

    You said it’s gonna get deep. What did you mean by that?
    It's gonna get deep, man, because... Um, what the East is doing, they think is... I understand it. I'm from there.

    It’s really like unifying the East coast. Because it was really like, in a slump. But they're doing it wrong. Cause they're using the West coast as a rallying cry. And they making it look like WE are the perpetrators of this big East coast -- West coast thing. They never had no problems. They could come out here and perform and they clap. We go out there and niggas is booing. That Source Awards, that's what start it. Not start it, but that Source Awards is what put it to a new level. They was booing and shit. Me personally being from both coasts, but I represent the West coast, I think that's disrespectful.

    What about Suge making a comment about Puffy at this year's Source Awards. Wasn't that kinda disrespectful?
    No, that's not disrespectful. That's his opinion and that's real. All he was doing was saying if they tired of having a manager shake his ass in their video. We don't do like that on the Row. That's real.



    Can’t that contribute to the whole East-West thing?
    Not as much as it does when y'all niggas... Um, when niggas goin' on the radio. It ain't about the West Coast, it's all about NY. Boo hoo hoo. Fuck the west, we the best. We started it. All them other niggas.

    I be listening.

    Suge has got the heart to say it in front of you. All these other muthafuckas been saying it behind our backs.

    By getting deep, to you, does that mean that some violence or death...
    I told you what I want. I want it to go on records. Let's make some money for the hood. The hood is [what] need us now. Fuck a nigga ego. I don't care. I could put all that shit aside and we could make records. And give money to the hood. Build some community centers with this. We can make it where we have block parties. Where we have Death Row and Bad Boy have rapping contests all over the hood and boom boom boom. We could do whatever.

    Tell me about your album, It's called All Eyez on Me.
    All Eyez on Me. The first single is “California Love”, with me and Dre and Roger Troutman. And then I got a single coming out two weeks after that with me and Snoop called “Two of America's Most Wanted”. “California Love” is just giving it up for California. You got “Crooklyn”, you got “Crooklyn” [Part] 1 and [Part] 2. You know, this is our “Crooklyn”. “Two of America's Most Wanted”, that's about me and Suge and our cases and our problems. We two of America's most wanted.

    You mean me and Snoop?
    Me and Snoop.

    Can you explain the title of the album?
    Everybody lookin’ at me right now. The police lookin’ at me, the females, my enemies, reporters, people that want me to fall, people that want me to make it. My mama. In jail, the guards. Everybody lookin’ at me. All eyes on me.

    How does that make you feel?
    It make me feel good. I like the challenge. I know I gotta get out here and put some good work out.

    I'm really into this album cause I want it to sell. I’m really trying to break some records with this. Cause no rapper's ever put out a double album. It's never been done before.

    How many songs did you say was on it?
    It's 28 songs. All brand new songs. All new. None of it was written in jail. All of it happened soon as I got out.

    You once said you were gonna go in a different direction. Is there any like introspection on this album, like you mentioned Marvin Gaye in the last interview...
    No. This album is like, hey....I never did an album like this before.

    Can you describe it in a phrase?
    Relentless. It's like so uncensored. Aw maaaan. All my albums to me be sad. When I was in jail in New York, niggas was like, “Man, come out with an album that's not like you're dying.” The reason I did an album Me Against the World is so I could do an album like this. This is an upbeat album. It's about celebrating my life. Celebrating being alive. Then I got this Outlaw Immortals project. That's the new Thug Life project.

    So Thug Life is not dead?
    It's not dead. It's Psych and Mopreme and some other homies from Thug Life. The project I'm involved with is called Outlaw Immortals. That's what happens when you pass thug life.


    Wow. You have a single with Faith [Evans], I understand.
    [Laughter] Yeah, sure do.

    What’s that called?
    "Wonda Why They Call U Bitch?"

    What's the song about?
    Exactly what it sound like. Everybody's wondering why we call females bitches. We don't call all females bitches. It's just certain things and we give examples. Leaving the key with her mother and she's fucking and she's just out. She's just a tramp.

    How did you hook up with Faith, given all this stuff you've been talking about?
    We met in the club and bumped it. Me and Faith don't have no problems.

    But you can’t talk about it on the record?
    Naw. Everybody that need to know know. [high-pitched laughter]



    The rumors about you and Faith... Uh, spending a lot of time outside the studio.
    You mean the rumor that I fucked her? Heh heh heh.
    I’d rather turn the tape recorder off if you gonna say that, bro.
    [Laughing hysterically] I ain't gonna answer that shit, man. You know I don't kiss and tell, man.



    Is there anything you wanna add? Cause this is real deep.
    I wanna add that man... I want niggas in NY to not feed into this shit.

    What about niggas on the West coast?
    They not feeding in, they about their money and shit. I'm talking about the East coast. Cause I love a lot of niggas out there. I love a lot of people out there.

    http://www.bilder-upload.eu/upload/6...1517643409.jpg

    I got a lot of support from NY when I was in jail. That's really important to me that NY don't think I'm trippin on you. This is just something that's been in me for a long time. They just dissing us. I can't take it no more. But I love all my fans, all the people that supported me, down for me. People like Freddie Foxxx who stayed down for me. People like Latifah and Treach and I heard that Smif-N-Wessun gave me some love on my album. I got nothing but love for them.

    But see people like Mobb Deep...stupid. Thug Life we still living it. That's what gonna start this whole new... What you see, this Outlaw Immortal shit...that's what started this.

    Biggie and them being in VIBE talking all that shit. Stretch, Fab Five...all them people. All that. That's what started all this. You hear what I said in my interview, I'm chilling. So-that's what it is. This Outlaw Immortal is off the hook, kid. Off the hook. There's a song on there called “Hit ‘Em Up” that's gonna be one of the most talked about. You remember like Ice Cube's “No Vaseline”, “Hit ‘Em Up” [is] gonna be like that. It's coming out a couple months after my album. On my record label and Death Row.

    What’s that called?
    Euthanasia Records.

    Why that title?
    I fell in love with that word. I feel like that's me. I'm gonna die, I just wanna die without pain. I don’t wanna die, but if I gotta go I wanna go without pain.

    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.jimdo.com
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 03-15-2018 at 01:45 AM.

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    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
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    A Dutch photographer who has spent two decades chronicling the lives of residents on a Los Angeles social housing project has won one of international photography’s most prestigious prizes.


    Dana Lixenberg was named winner of the 20th Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation prize at a ceremony in London on Thursday evening.

    'Are you FBI?' – how I captured the everyday life of gangland LA

    She won the £30,000 prize for her project Imperial Courts (1993-2015), the name of the social housing project Lixenberg first visited after LA’s race riots of 1992. Lixenberg kept visiting, photographing, filming and recording the mostly African-American residents as their lives panned out.

    Brett Rogers, the director of the Photographers’ Gallery in London and chair of the judges, said they had been impressed by the artist’s “comprehensive and measured” series of photographs: “Lixenberg’s work is simultaneously understated and emphatic, reflecting a cool sobriety, which allows her subjects to own the gaze and their contexts without sentimentality or grandiosity.”

    The photographs have been admired as a contrast to the often one-dimensional, negative and stereotyped images of communities with gangland violence.

    Lixenberg has said her approach was to slow things down. She told the Guardian: “I don’t want to use a person to illustrate a story. I want each image to be its own self-contained story, and then together, as a body, they present the community in a certain way.

    “It’s not the wild west, with people shooting each other, but people do live with a lot of loss and death.”

    Lixenberg said the community was initially wary of her, asking if she was with the FBI, but that quickly changed. “Over the years I’ve become part of the furniture, the picture lady!”



    Lixenberg, who is based in New York and Amsterdam, is known for long-term projects about individuals and communities on the margins of society, as well as her magazine portraits of Puff Daddy, Prince, Tupac Shakur, Eminen and many others.

    Imperial Courts was first published as a book, and is also a web documentary co-created with Eefje Blankevoort.

    She was chosen from a shortlist that also featured the French conceptual artist Sophie Calle, whose work explores her response following the deaths of her cat, mother and father. The other artists are Awoiska van der Molen, with large, strange, black and white landscapes; and Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs, for a multimedia display documenting their journey from Switzerland to Mongolia.

    All four displays of work will be at the Photographers’ Gallery until 11 June, after which it will tour to the MMK in Frankfurt and the Aperture Foundation in New York.

    The judges for this year’s prize were curators Susan Bright and Karolina Lewandowska, artist Pieter Hugo, and the director of the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation, Anne-Marie Beckmann.

    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.jimdo.com
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 02-17-2018 at 02:57 AM.

  4. #49
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    Artbound's editorial team has reviewed and rated the most compelling weekly articles. After putting two articles up for a vote, the audience chose this article to be made into a short-format documentary.




    Thumb through a stack of major Los Angeles hip-hop albums from the late 1980s through mid-1990s and you might notice one name credited on all of them: Michael Miller. During the West Coast's hip-hop scene's ascension into global fame, the photographer ended up being the go-to lensman for countless album covers and publicity stills. Miller's output is staggering, and would be hard to believe if not for his recent, self-published book documenting all of it: "West Coast Hip-Hop: A History In Pictures."



    In it, Miller compiles literal portraits of California hip-hop during one of its most vibrant eras. That includes the giants of the scene such as Tupac, Cypress Hill and Snoop Dogg but also lesser-known artists such as the Whooliganz, Funkdoobiest and a group originally called the Atban Klann (better known by their later name: Black Eyed Peas).

    http://www.bilder-upload.eu/upload/7...1518863349.png

    Michael Miller | Photo by Oliver Wang.Michael Miller | Photo by Oliver Wang.
    Miller grew up on the Westside, attending Santa Monica public schools while living in Malibu, back when he says it was still "really country." His teen years were impeccably timed; not only was he classmates with Rob Lowe and Sean Penn, but as an avid skater and surfer, Miller ended up befriending members of the Dogtown skating crew, the Z-Boys, especially Tony Alva.

    Miller graduated from UCLA in the mid 1980s and decamped for Europe, first to compete in downhill skiing before ending up in Paris, where he briefly made ends meet by painting houses. His entry into photographer was a bit of a fluke, he says. He and a friend, "were after one thing and it [was] to date models and it's where my photography first started." Whatever his original motives, Miller quickly proved gifted for the craft and within months, was traveling across Europe to shoot campaigns for Cacharel and other major fashion houses.

    When he returned home to L.A., his fashion work caught the eye of record labels such as EMI and by the late 1980s, he was shooting artists as varied as girl rockers The Go-Go's and Heart, to jazz players such as Stan Getz and Herb Alpert. Miller, however, grew up a hip-hop fan, listening to 1580 AM, KDAY, the first 24 hour hip-hop station in the country. As a teen, he used to spin late-night shows on KBOO, literally an underground radio station housed in a Malibu basement. In 1989, he snapped his first rap-related cover, for the original N.W.A. group member, Arabian Prince and his debut solo album. That began Miller's long history of shooting the key figures on the West Coast rap scene, thoroughly compiled in "West Coast Hip-Hop" and the subject of his in-progress documentary about the influence of this region's hip-hop culture on the rest of the world.

    "West Coast Hip-Hop" includes extensive background testimonials to almost all the photos, providing crucial personal and historical context. During the course of our interview, we asked him to expand on the backstories to a few of his most iconic images and here's what he shared.

    Miller first met Coolio through rapper WC and Warner Bros. hired him to shoot the cover for Coolio's debut album. LP cover for Coolio's "It Takes a Thief" (Warner Bros., 1994) | Original photo by Michael Miller.
    MM: I'm living over here on Stanley [Ave.]...and there's a knock at my door and Coolio comes with his hair like that and I go, "a star is born." Coolio is gangster. He was gnarly. I mean, he was a great person, but his face...look at the image. It's scary! But again, he loved me. I did all his covers.

    Where did you take that photo? It took me a long time to realize it wasn't some kind of abstract illustration; it's razor wire.

    MM: That was a great demo[lition] yard. [I told Coolio], "get on the ladder, put your head in the barbed wire, just put your head in the middle of the barbed wire.

    http://www.bilder-upload.eu/upload/b...1518855890.png

    " I got in the barbed wire and shot through it. It was spontaneous, it wasn't a premeditated photograph, it was "let's go." The art director, his name was Erwin [Gorostiza], a couple of years later he tells me, "oh, the photo won awards." He never told me [at the time].

    regulateMiller was hired at the last minute by Def Jam head, Lyor Cohen, to shoot the cover for Warren G's debut, "Regulate...The G-Funk Era." Miller had to fly directly home from New York after his meeting with Cohen in order to make the shoot the next morning. They originally had planned to shoot Warren in a location that Miller had chosen but the rapper had other plans. Album cover for Warren G's "Regulate...G Funk Era" (Def Jam, 1994) | Original photo by Michael Miller.
    MM: I got an old naval demo yard locked down in San Pedro. Acres of gas towers and broken down warehouses. Warren's all mellow and he [insists], "I got to do a shot on 21st and Lewis where I grew up. That's going to be my cover." So we drive to 21st and Lewis [in Long Beach] and it's in the middle of the day. The worst possible light you can have. I just shoot. You just gotta go for it. The art direction was unbelievable. [Director] Steve Carr put a black strip on top and reversed the palm trees. The cover's one of my favorites. They really nailed it. They added another photo of them on a wall. I shot [that] in the alley by his house.

    They all grew up there. There's so many rappers and superstars that were on 19th and Lewis and all over the place. Snoop did his first "Doggystyle" video, with all the dogs running after him, in that alley.

    In 1989, Miller was hired to shoot an album cover for WC and the Maad Circle. The shoot ended up being on L.A.'s downtown Skid Row. W.C. on L.A. skid row, 1989 | Photo by Michael Miller.

    MM: Every shoot, there's a concept. I try and get that out of the artist. WC came to me and was like "I want a census worker counting people on Skid Row." So I went down to skid row at 12:30 at night and it was a gnarly situation. All of the sudden, out of the shadows, there's this dude sweaty, just running by full speed, "fuck you Hollywood motherfuckers, get the fuck out of here, I'ma fucking kick your ass." We walk around the fence and he's throwin' up a set and WC's like, "yo homie! That's my crew!" And they started talking and -- boom -- best friends. Immediately, it just switched. These guys are intense. But when you're down with them, it's just all love. We ended up becoming buddies with Scrap Loc. He's in that photo.

    Many of Miller's photo shoots with rappers happened at the beginning of their career. With Tupac Shakur however, the rapper was nearing the height of his fame; he was anything but a newcomer. Tupac Shakur, 1994 | Photo by Michael Miller
    MM: He was huge. I was nervous to say the least. I tried to keep my enthusiasm under control. That one, we were over by, I think it was 51st and Santa Fe and it was an old train yard. I got a lot of great shots of him that day. After this shot, there there was abandoned train tracks and railroad cars. We went inside, my assistant got Burger King. We went inside and we all kicked it in the old train.

    Then we went over to Elysian Park and it was dangerous so when things got a little heavy, we'd just move. Nothing dramatic happened, we ever had any physical altercations but we did have gang situations where it was gnarly. With Tupac, he attracted everyone. Like, "Tupac's in the neighborhood, let's go!" If some gangsters came out of the woodwork, he knew. He'd be like, "let's go. Hop in the van, let's get out of here."
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    Photographing a Los Angeles Community for 22 Years

    George Pitts
    Nov 19, 2015



    Imperial Courts, 1993–2015, the long awaited photography book by Dutch photographer Dana Lixenberg and published by Roma,

    features some of her finest, and most eloquent photographs, suffused with compassion, austere visual beauty, and a tender attention toward the wide scope of individuals who comprise the Imperial Courts community in Los Angeles.

    Short-listed for PhotoBook of the Year by the 2015 Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards, the copious tome is the culmination of years of diligent work.

    In March 1993, after traveling to South Central Los Angeles on assignment for the Dutch weekly magazine Vrij Nederland to document a story on the “destruction and rebuilding” of the vicinity in the aftermath of the Rodney King verdict, photographer

    Dana Lixenberg was moved to develop what became a 22-year effort capturing in portraits, members of the community at the Imperial Courts housing project in Watts, Los Angeles. Enabled first through meeting The Black Carpenters association, a group of contractors and activists, and through them, a more auspicious meeting with the late Tony Bogard, leader of the

    Imperial Courts PJ Watts Crips, Lixenberg was introduced to a neighborhood, the Imperial Courts projects, and a community of people, who gradually became the subjects of her striking volume.

    A photo essay of her earliest portraits from Imperial Courts, accompanied by a poem, People of Watts, by playwright Ntozake Shange, was first published in the November 1993 edition of Vibe magazine when I served as photography director
    Lixenberg’s tough non-pandering aesthetic assisted Vibe in establishing its visual tone and often poignant photographic vocabulary, which complemented and contradicted the slicker celebrity and fashion-oriented content.

    When we realized that her manner of capturing the most daring musicians in an unvarnished and uniquely powerful way, we assigned her cover and feature shoots with figures such as Tupac Shakur, The Notorious B.I.G., Prince, Eminem, and others. Her portraits of Tupac alone were the source of numerous murals worldwide, and to this day proliferate on T-shirts everywhere. And these were not overly slick images; but like the Imperial Courts photos, were true toward his depth and obvious vulnerability.

    Imperial Courts is a modest yet epic 22-year project compiled in a thoughtful, exquisitely designed monograph. An all black-and-white opus, and although a far cry from photographer Taryn Simon’s all color first book, The Innocents, Lixenberg’s volume can also be construed as a conceptual effort that draws simultaneous attention to the race of the subjects and the race, and perhaps gender, of the photographer.

    The book spreads in Imperial Courts are meticulously arranged. In many of them, the juxtapositions of the photographs create a fiction, a compelling story that one can plainly see, yet subtly plotted to hide the evidence of narrative intention.

    The single photo spreads with its luxury of a blank page beside it, amplify the fascination with the one image, which is carefully selected, such as the rigorously simple “Leslie and Ashley (2013),” one of her finest pictures, which appears familiar yet strange at the same time.

    Subtle understatement is contrasted with severe understatement: still life versus portrait, streetscape drily rendered versus black-and-white head shot that together resonate more like a film than a traditional layout.

    Silently heroic postures are paired or shown along with the quiet banal truths of trees, outdoor architecture, and the mysteries of presence observed without shrill exaggeration.
    Overly familiar tropes such as sexiness, and comparable assertions of body language are shown in more frequency in the moving genealogy, with its smaller-scaled pictures and postage size thumbnails running beside them.

    The genealogy pages also demonstrate a seeming wider range of settings throughout the housing project. Yet virtually all Lixenberg’s subjects in this volume exhibit a cool sobriety that keeps stylized swagger at arm’s length. It is impossible to characterize the presence and stunning quietude emanating from these individuals.

    It is a visual signature of Lixenberg’s that she has sometimes described as “deliberately undramatic.” Ironically by stripping back the conscious postering common to many of us, she often arrives at a fresh or more shrewd way of idealizing her subjects Innovative in its capture and depiction of emotion, and in its modest defiance toward cultural stereotypes, either cloying or sentimentally heroic, Imperial Courts finds a middle way to commemorate a community,

    through a persuasive subtlety as opposed to the brutal clarity of earnest photojournalism, which accommodates the collective humanity of the denizens of the housing project. The book is an advance on how specifically people of color are represented in cultural media. Lixenberg stands in that ambiguous position of ‘getting’ the ordinary dimensions of a racial minority, simultaneously with her formal apprehension of the diverse beauty of a people.

    Race is writ large and small, even in this disciplined, understated and complex appreciation; but in sustaining her vigorously cool expansive aesthetic, Lixenberg restores this community’s privilege to be flawed, capable of falling victim to addiction, murder, disappearing never to be seen again; yet welcoming toward a photographer from another planet, a sincere witness, capable of great art, willing to wait and wait, then snap to work.

    George Pitts is an assistant professor at Parsons The New School for Design, and a photographer and writer living in Brooklyn, N.Y. Previously, he was director of photography at LIFE Magazine and Vibe Magazine. You can see more of his work here.

    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.jimdo.com
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    'Love West Coast,' the latest exhibition at Dax Gallery of photographer Mike Miller's commercial photography from the '90s to today, is a look at influential veterans of the west coast rap scene from the '90s as well as newer, more recent shots from Miller's new photobook Love West Coast Girls.



    http://www.bilder-upload.eu/upload/5...1521091435.png

    Miller's show, more than anything, details his love for Southern California's diverse set of cultures and subcultures, from hip-hop to skate to lowriders, with an eye for street photography. And along with the help of his wife, collaborator and stylist Shannon, Miller has been able to capture a gritty aesthetic in his work that has since influenced other fashion photographers to this day.

    Growing up in Santa Monica, Miller developed an interest in skateboarding and recalls moving to Paris as a young man. It was there that Miller met legendary fashion photographer Peter Lindbergh and gained a knowledge his knowledge of photography and grew into his own as a commercial photographer. He later moved back to the states with a portfolio of fashion photography and was hired to shoot album covers, shooting a variety of musicians like The Go-Gos, Stan Getz and Herb Albert.


    But hip-hop and rap was Miller's wheelhouse. Some of his most iconic work has been of Tupac Shakur, Eazy-E, N.W.A., Arabian Prince, Warren G, Ice Cube, Coolio, and more.

    "People don't believe that shot of Eazy-E with the skateboard was real, I'd get all kinds of responses like 'you probably Photoshopped that in!'" Eazy was so charismatic. I was skateboarding one time in front of Ruthless Records working on a shoot with Eazy and he pulls up and is like, "Oh you skate?

    I skate too," and he pulls out a skateboard that was famous at the time with a Satan image on it, it was also banned, and here was Eazy riding up on that banned skateboard."



    It wasn't long before Miller's work became sought after by record companies. "When I was shooting rap covers, [record companies] would just throw money at me, there was no art direction. They'd just go, 'Mike do it'. They would also give me the worst case scenario, like, 'oh God, we don't want to deal with Pantera so just go shoot them.' But they're just regular people."

    Miller's own working class background lent itself to finding some harsh backgrounds to shoot in, but often lead to some sticky situations. "The locations were always what I looked for to make a story," Shannon Miller says, "I didn't even know the neighborhood really well but I just drove around and I'm just writing down streets to shoot in. And [Mike] would get there and he loved [the area] and it was all good, but once some cholos drove up and were like "this is our memorial to a mural for someone who had just passed away.' And then it turned into a not good situation."

    Miller recalls another occasion where a photo shoot would get a little hairy. "Most of my shoots were in Compton, Watts, Inglewood or Southgate or East LA and Downtown LA. There was this one cover we were shooting with Tupac… it turned out we were shooting in the Blood neighborhood. People started coming out of the woodwork and it got a little hairy, these guns were coming out, and Tupac was just like, 'we gotta go.'"

    Although even with the tumultuous times in Los Angeles during the '90s, Shannon admits there wasn't much of a social commentary behind their shoots. "It was never planned to make a point, we just never thought that deep. We just had concepts and stories to tell, and we just wanted to make it look good and make it great."

    The affable Miller still shoots hip-hop figures today like Boozy, A$AP Rocky, YG and Yo Yo. His newest photobook Love West Coast Girls brings back Miller's cross-processing technique which he originated in Europe in the late '80s, and features shots of upcoming actresses, models, surfers, skaters, cholas and other southern California beauties. Miller's own brand of street-fashion photography has remained influential for later generations of bloggers, street photographers, and fashion photographers to this day, and Miller still stays as "rough, rugged and raw" as when he started. "it doesn't matter where you're from or where you point me to, i'll just find locations… so every time we shoot a roll of film we get the shot. That's my style, 'get the shot'."

    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.jimdo.com
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    To mark the 20 year anniversary of Tupac‘s tragic death, VIBE magazine have published a commemorative cover that also includes an unreleased excerpt from Kevin Powell‘s candid 1996 interview with the late rap icon. The in-depth conversation went down just six months before Pac was murdered in Las Vegas, and his unsettled, troubled state of mind is made clear thanks to his incredibly frank responses.



    Before the interview even starts, VIBE include an editor’s note that explains the “intense climate” within the hip hop community at the time. “There were high tensions on both sides of the country that made it dangerous for artists and crews to maneuver freely between coasts,” they explain. They also seek to state their intention for posting the excerpt: “We print this transcript not to perpetuate negative narratives, but to add another chapter to our journalistic tradition—to show Tupac as he was toward the end of his days. This rare glimpse at the end of Tupac’s story finds him erratic, introspective, and brilliantly insightful as always. We offer it with deep appreciation for ‘Pac, and with respect for his family, friends and fans.”

    In the interview, Powell questions Tupac on his role in the hostile nature of the hip hop community at the time. “We all black and everything…but I’m not talking about division. I’m talking about realism. You don’t hang with us. You live different than we live. We all brothers, but we don’t all live the same,” he explains. “I don’t want it to be fighting, I don’t want no arguing, I just wanna make my money. You can’t tell me I’m gonna sit down and hug and kiss n*ggas to make everybody else feel good. Straight up, there is no beef. If there was a beef n*ggas would know.”

    http://www.bilder-upload.eu/upload/2...1521092162.png

    Tupac also discusses the process behind his acclaimed album All Eyez On Me, opening up about the title and revealing how raw of an album it was for him. “Everybody lookin’ at me right now,” he explains. “The police lookin’ at me, the females, my enemies, reporters, people that want me to fall, people that want me to make it. My mama. In jail, the guards. Everybody lookin’ at me. All eyes on me.”

    At the end of the interview, Pac speaks about his then upcoming record label, Euthanasia Records. In an ironic, sad twist, his final answer about the name of the label acts as a poignant, tragically prophetic precursor to his death: “I fell in love with that word. I feel like that’s me. I’m gonna die, I just wanna die without pain. I don’t wanna die, but if I gotta go I wanna go without pain.” Check out the full VIBE story here.

    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.de
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    By now, Tupac Shakur is etched in our collective memory as simultaneously an imperfect saint and a perfect outlaw. In photos, you feel it. Simultaneously idealized and crucified in the public sphere, Tupac’s photographic legacy tells the story. The 20th anniversary of his death in Las Vegas just passed on September 7th. He was only 25-years-old. Los Angeles-bred photographer Mike Miller captured the iconic double middle finger shot just a year earlier as part of his album cover shoot for Tupac’s Thug Life album. He still has over 70 scans in the vault that no one has seen of Tupac.

    For Miller, the shoot embodied style, humor and urgency. One can imagine Tupac cracking up while giving the double middle finger to the camera. To a hip hop outsider, the pose can seem menacing but look closer and you start to understand there was a lot of humor in between the layers of raw aggression of the pose.

    “Style, the extension of the exquisitely personal into the public sphere, is something he had from the beginning,” wrote Zach Baron in GQ last year. “Other rappers imitated his easy, comfortable masculinity, his loose clothes, his confidence, his tattoos. He had the kind of aura others wanted to borrow. He’d wear things seemingly at random: vests, flannels, denim jackets, camo jackets, Henleys over other Henleys. Casual, almost incidental clothes to which he lent permanence.
    Shakur was defiance, one of those men who expressed it in both verse and style.”

    Born and raised in Los Angeles, Miller grew up in the punk, surf and skate scene, which eventually grew into a love of hip hop. He would go on to photograph West Coast hip hop in its infancy starting in the late 1980s when he snapped shots of his first rapper, Arabian Prince. Fashion campaigns for Stussy and others followed and soon, DJ Muggs (Cypress Hill) asked Miller to photograph the group while they were still shopping a demo. The rest as they say is history. Miller’s book West Coast Hip Hop: A History In Pictures features Eazy-E, Ice Cube, Snoop Dogg, Too Short, Cypress Hill and the list goes on.

    Mike Miller: Tupac was at the height of his career when we shot this. We first met up at Runyon Canyon where he had a condo. Tupac was very charming, present and highly intelligent. There was probably around 15 people in his crew. We all caravanned from location to location. He told me in private that he was happy to be able to make an album with all his homies that he grew up with.

    We first went to this hubcap place in South Central LA and you can see those in the background of some of the images, but then people started coming out of the woodwork so we had to leave. People recognized him everywhere and we did have gang situations where it was gnarly, but nothing serious that day. We spent 12 hours shooting around LA — East LA, Watts/Compton, downtown LA. For the shoot, he immediately turned on. He and his boys. Then we went to an abandoned train yard which is where we got the double middle finger shot. That was more like an outtake but when I looked at, I knew.

    The Camera Nerd Out
    3 cameras Nikon 35mm in a Pentax 6 x 7 and a Polaroid 600 SE – Wide Angle to portrait lens

    The Q+A
    This shot of Tupac symbolizes so much of Tupac’s defiance. Tell us more about the vibe on set that day?
    He was into my ideas for the shoot. My wife Shannon and I found locations all over LA.
    Shannon also did the wardrobe and never wanted too many logos and always tried to keep it timeless. He was down. Shannon purposely didn’t put any logos, keep it timeless with the Dickies and authenticity.



    That’s interesting that you purposely kept logos out of the shoot.
    Tupac was very confident and highly intelligent. He was on the ball. He knew exactly how he wanted to be portrayed. That shoot in particular he was able to have all his homies he grew up with and have them on the cover with them and he was really happy to have the power to bring his people in the mix. My wife and I really are a team.

    What has been people’s reaction to this shot over the years?
    People have really grown up with that shot and people identify with that shot. People identify with Tupac. It stirs up alot of emotion for people.

    The shot is also very humorous in way and you can feel that there was a real trust and camaraderie on set that day.
    Absolutely. I mean there we were on this big budget shoot and we all had a bond going. In doing a shoot, you have to establish trust very quickly. Tupac drove with me shotgun in my car and we got to know each other. We clicked. There were a lot of good images that came out of that shoot. And that’s largely because we had good creative energy going and alot of trust.

    There are subtle nods to the West Coast in this shoot. Can you talk about that?
    Tupac wore his left pant leg up and that signified West Coast. Enough said.

    What photographers/creative did you admire?
    Helmut Newton, Javier Vallhonrat, Paolo Roversi

    Talk about your process and evolution as a photographer
    I’ve been doing this a long time now and I am proud to say I have worked with the greats. Roger Troutman (of Zapp) was my first album cover and then I shot the Go-Go’s and the list goes on. Every job I’ve ever done, I would go into full focus mode. I would turn into a machine. I would search out locations and have a game plan. I began as a fashion photographer and music just became my niche. Music influences everything, the world.

    What made you first want to become a photographer?
    At the time I was living in Paris and there was a model apartment next-door.
    Some of the models were my friends and my roommate gave me a Camera just started shooting.

    What are your favorite type of subjects to shoot?
    Music. It’s what inspires fashion, athletes and actors. Even if it’s a band that I personally not into I’m very aware of the importance music plays on society.



    What was your first camera you used and what is your favorite camera to use now?
    My first camera was a Nikon F2. It was to given to me by Linda Evangelista and it was Peter Lindberg’s camera. These days I’m digging my medium format camera and the Canon Mark 3 has given me the ability to switch into video mode for my documentaries, commercials and videos.

    What role does photography play in Tupac’s legacy and in hip hop overall?
    When I shot back in the day, I didn’t reference things or copy things. My dad had a demolition company in Compton and I was never meant to be a photographer. I was supposed to be in demolition. But music found me. I grew up on Hendrix and Zepplin and then evolved into punk rock and then hip hop was just that natural progression if you were into that kind of protest music. Once these major icons pass like Marilyn Monroe and Tupac etc… It’ documents a moment in history. These days I shoot all kinds of artists from ASAP Rocky to YG but I’m more aware of what these images will mean for the future of the culture.
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    Interview with Joey Jordison

    That’s an interesting comment, “everything’s stale”. Do you think that’s something in your head or do you think that’s something in the world in general with music?



    It’s just in my head. I can’t speak for you. Because I appreciate any band that puts out a record and goes on tour and does what we do for a living. Its amazingly hard you know and it’s difficult to continue to have passion for it on a night to night basis depending on what’s going on in your personal life and within the band, within everything. But as far as being a music fan there hasn’t been that next Pantera to me, there hasn’t been that type of band… there hasn’t been another Korn. There hasn’t been another Slipknot to where I was like, “Wow man. I’m totally into it, I would go see the show”. It just hasn’t affected me yet like that.

    It might, you never know.

    It might. I don’t look too hard though either, I really don’t. I’m pretty into what I’m in to and it’s probably my loss…I’m probably missing out on some things but… it’s just I got a lot of other things to do too.
    To what extent do you think that you bring the bands that you grew up with, with you and how does that then influence your musical style?




    It’s different for me because I play percussion. So it’s like there’s never been a band that I’ve listened to back in the metal days that had that. So I really don’t…but I bring that love for metal and that attitude and that comes through on tape.

    When Slipknot first started off there were nine of you and that’s a lot of people in a band. There were a lot of suggestions that other bands would follow suit and they haven’t really. Do you think there’s a reason for that?

    Maybe because we did it.

    [Laughing]

    They don’t want to be accused of ripping off Slipknot?

    Yeah, yeah. But you know yeah. I’ve seen other bands, I can’t remember specific names, but I have seen other bands or other musicians play percussion or do some things live that we do… a DJ, you know stuff like that. But I mean that’s just, it’s part of music these days I guess.

    The way that you and Clown interact on stage, and with the audience while playing really adds theatre to your performance. Not just theatre but the embodiment of what people love about Slipknot – the excitement, the energy, the uniqueness. Is that something that you feel on stage?

    I don’t know. I’m so close to it that I guess it’s just…It’s normal to me yeah.

    So what’s next for Slipknot?


    The next show [Laughing]. It means its touring, and it is tough. Its tough, and so focusing on tonight is the main thing and then once the show’s over, we figure out what time we have to leave and what’s the next city because we have three in a row now. if we think too far ahead it demeans what’s happening today.

    Slipknot have always come across as being a very organised and thought out band, even before you were playing arenas. Maybe it’s around you rather than necessarily something you do yourselves?

    Yeah, obviously there is, there’s a lot of planning that goes into to making this happen. So many people. The crew is amazing and getting everything set up and ready to go every night is very, very organised. There’s still freedom, there’s still chaos just everything normal that any band goes through.

    So to close off the interview, the site that I write for is called Rock Sins. What is your biggest rock sin?

    Sin?

    Yeah like the seven deadly sins. So it can be something about you, something about the band, a story, something about you personally.

    Like a religious sin? I mean obviously I’m not…I’m human there’s been a lot. It just depends on what I want to reveal I suppose. I’ll just say there’s been many.
    Probably still to come.
    Yeah.



    Thank you very much indeed.

    Interview by Lisa Fox.
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    Story behind Paul Gray

    Every one who knew original Slipknot bassist and songwriter Paul Gray says pretty much the same thing: the guy was super-nice, incredibly friendly and never reeked of rock star ego. The few times I interviewed Gray I found him to be totally accommodating, brutally honest, and extremely proud of the music he wrote and played with the band he loved and loved to talk about. Even when it came to describing something as old-hat as how they got their name, Gray spoke with the enthusiasm of someone telling the story for the first time.

    “We had a show booked and we had a song called ‘Slipknot,’” he told me. “It was the first song we had written full-on, which became ‘Sick,’ which was the first song we ever started working on even before [ex-drummer] Joey [Jordison] was in the band. We all thought the name Slipknot rolled off the tongue pretty easy and we needed a name so we could play the show. We did one other show before that and we were called Meld, but we didn’t like that at all. So we went with Slipknot. And that show, people just tripped out. They’d never seen anything like it.

    After that, we couldn’t really change the name.”



    Gray was like a glowing mass of energy that bounced around the room, affecting everyone it touched. But he definitely had his dark side and no matter how hard he tried, he was unable to kick his drug habits for long. When I sat backstage with him shortly before the band released All Hope is Gone, the last record he toured for before his tragic death on May 24, 2010, the bassist admitted that his addiction to heroin spiraled so far out of control in 2003 while the band was working on Vol. 3: The Subliminal Verses that the band eventually staged an intervention.


    “I would spend half the time in the bathroom shooting up,” he revealed. “I’d be trying to play, and I’d fall out of my chair a couple times and fall asleep in the middle of tracking a song. Once you get to a certain point with drugs it’s f–kin’ so hard going through withdrawal. It’s not that you don’t want to quit. You just can’t. Halfway through the record I ended up going to rehab.”

    http://www.bilder-upload.eu/upload/9...1521350293.jpg

    Gray was finally able to kick heroin after his girlfriend and future wife Brenna gave him an ultimatum. “She said, ‘I can’t sit around and watch you kill yourself,'” he says. “I was living in L.A. at the time, which wasn’t helping because it was so easy [to get drugs]. So, I moved back to Iowa with her and went to my doctor and got straightened out. And it’s been a good couple years now that I’ve been clean.”

    When Slipknot released All Hope Is Gone on August 20, 2008, it seemed like there were other band members who were far more spun-out than Gray.

    For two years, the band toured for the album and, while chaos reigned, Gray seemed to thrive in the maelstrom, rocking out in his demonic pig outfit, and hanging out and sharing laughs with percussionist and co-founder Shawn Crahan, guitarist Jim Root and vocalist Corey Taylor after the shows. It seemed like Gray, with the help of his wife and bandmates, had taken control of his personal demons and was living a clean life.

    That’s why it was such a shock when, on May 24, 2010, the Des Moines Register reported that Gray’s body was found at the TownPlace Suites Hotel in Johnston, Iowa at approximately 10:50 a.m. local time. He was 38. A hotel employee said there was a hypodermic next to Gray’s bed and pills scattered across the room. Forensic tests later revealed that Gray died from an accidental overdose of morphine and the painkiller Fentanyl, had a substantial quantity of the anti-anxiety medication Xanax in his system and showed signs of “significant heart disease.”



    Devastated by Gray’s death, the surviving members of Slipknot, Gray’s widow and brother, Tony, held a video press conference the next day. During the teary event, vocalist Corey Taylor said, “The only way I can sum up Paul Gray is love. Everything he did, he did for everyone around him whether he knew you or not. …I will miss him with every fiber of my heart, as will everybody at this table and everyone who knew him.

    He was the best of us.”

    While Gray’s wife, Brenna, pregnant with their child at the time, presented a united front with the rest of Slipknot, she changed her tune in the years that followed, taking legal action against Gray’s physician (who was eventually acquitted of seven charges of manslaughter charges) and pot shots at members of the Knot. “One was playing golf two minutes away from our house [when Gray was suffering from a spiral of drug abuse], but couldn’t come,” she testified in April, 2014, reported the Des Moines Register. “Nobody else cared, nobody was involved. They told me it was my problem.”

    Gray’s wife testified in Polk County District Court that Gray relapsed in 2008 and the last weeks of his life were a haze of addiction.

    On May 22, 2010, Gray left home and checked into the long-term stay hotel after his family tried to stage an intervention. Brenna Gray told the media that she didn’t call police because she was afraid they would find drugs stashed away at the couple’s house and her unborn child would be taken from her. After two days of being unable to reach Gray, his relatives asked the hotel staff to check his room and see if he was okay.

    When they discovered the bassist’s body they immediately called police.

    Gray was buried on May 28 in a private funeral at the Highland Memory Gardens Cemetery in Iowa. In 2011 Slipknot played a series of shows in Europe. The band’s former guitarist Donnie Steele played bass for the shows and on the band’s headline Mayhem Fest appearances. He remained with Slipknot until 2014, when he was replaced by bassist Alessandro Venturella.

    Loudwire contributor Jon Wiederhorn is the co-author of Louder Than Hell: The Definitive Oral History of Metal, as well as the co-author of Scott Ian’s autobiography, I’m the Man: The Story of That Guy From Anthrax, and Al Jourgensen’s autobiography, Ministry: The Lost Gospels According to Al Jourgensen.

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    As a photographer and film director, Danny Clinch has worked with some of the biggest names in the music business—Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young, Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Pearl Jam and Tupac Shakur to name a few. He currently has a gallery show called “Transparent” on display at the Asbury Hotel in Asbury Park, New Jersey, running until May 1. Clinch recently spoke with Pulse about his fruitful career and gave advice to anyone trying to follow in his footsteps.

    How did you become a photographer?
    I’ve always been a big fan of music. My high school years had a soundtrack and we would be listening to the Allman Brothers, Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, Bob Seger and Bruce Springsteen. So I started to get into photography, and one of my neighbors had an old Pentax that he had bought… I asked if I could borrow the camera. He loaned it to me, and I never gave it back!

    I started to sneak into shows that I was going to, like Van Halen, and got a buzz from that kind of stuff… [I] started to integrate my love of photography and music. And when I went to school up in Boston, I had a [journalism] teacher who loved music as well… I was asked to do a photo essay, and a lot of people were doing typical things. I decided I was going to find a band and make my photo essay out of that. I hooked up with this band called Rick Berlin: The Movie. That was one of the turning points for me. After that, I did some photographic workshops. The big thing was I did a workshop with Annie Leibovitz and it ended up turning into an internship for me, and then I worked for Annie for little over a year. That just opened a lot of doors for me.

    Your studio is in New York City.
    My home is in New Jersey, but I run my business here—my archives are all here. The music scene in New York City is incredible. And I run my business on relationships and a lot of my friends live here; a lot of the musicians live here. There are tons of shows here. Bands are passing through all the time. I can literally walk to Madison Square Garden from where my place is, which is awesome.

    You’ve photographed countless famous rock musicians over the years, including Bruce Springsteen.
    You feel like you’ve gotten an opportunity that most people don’t get. And I feel like I’m honored to be able to still be a documentary photographer, in a sense, and capture that sort of history for the people that love music and love that artist. I was in the studio when they were doing “Countin’ on a Miracle,” and I was photographing and got some pretty cool stuff. I had asked the management if I could bring a film camera down, and they said sure. I asked Bruce, “Would you mind bringing your guitar in this room? There’s some really nice light here.” He grabbed his guitar, sat down, and he played “Countin’ on a Miracle,” but he played it like an old delta blues song. It was incredible. I filmed it and cut it together, and he ended up using it for that tour. Before he came out, he would show this little short film of him playing “Countin’ on a Miracle.”



    What is the status of the Shannon Hoon film of his home movies that you are co-directing?
    These things take a very long time. There’s a lot of film to look through. Although we’ve raised money for the film and it’s been very helpful, it’s still a lot of people working in their spare time. The money only goes so far. But it’s moving forward; we have meetings for it all the time.

    Any advice for photographers?
    The important thing is to find your own voice, your own point of view. It’s hard to understand what that is, but I think for me, it’s like, “What is your lens choice? What is your style?” And how can someone look at your photo and say, “Oh, that’s a Danny photo.” And I think it’s about relationships and treating people well and being trustworthy. And it’s just getting out there and showing up and doing it. Like they say, 90 percent of the job is showing up. You can’t be afraid to fail—you just have to go out there and do it, make mistakes and just keep putting in your 10,000 hours. I don’t think it’s any easier or harder than it’s been in the past. It’s different. The fact is a good photographer is a good photographer and someone who hustles is most likely going to outdo the person who is not hustling.
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    Photographer Danny Clinch is known for shooting with musicians that span a variety of genres. From Bruce Springsteen and Johnny Cash, to Nas and the Beastie Boys, Clinch is always able to capture a special, often candid, moment. One such portrait – that of the late rapper Tupac Shakur – has gone down in music history as arguably the most famous image of the artist.

    “It was Rolling Stone magazine and I was thinking to myself, ‘Oh man, if this guy ever blew up, I would have this great photograph,” Clinch tells TIME in a new video interview. “What if this record is so well received that it could end up on the cover of [the magazine].”

    When Clinch’s portrait originally ran in Rolling Stone in 1993, it was for a short profile story. Three years later, on Sept. 13, 1996, when Shakur tragically died after being shot in a drive-by shooting, Clinch’s photo session with the rapper gained much attention, with Rolling Stone running one of the portraits on the cover.



    Now, 20 years after Shakur’s death, Danny Clinch reflects on his experience working with the rapper.

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    Tupac Shakur's old running buddies The Outlawz have made some far-out claims about how they paid homage to their fallen friend in the immediate aftermath of his death, and members of the Shakur family are none too pleased.




    In a recent interview with VladTV, The Outlawz confirm rumors that members of the group rolled the legendary rapper's ashes with marijuana at his memorial and "smoked him out" as a final farewell.

    "It's definitely true," Young Noble says. "We hit the beach and had a little memorial for him with his Moms and family and s**t. We was just givin' him our own farewell ... We twisted up some of that great-granddaddy California kush and mixed the big homie with it, ya know what I mean?"

    Fellow Outlaw E.D.I. Mean says the illicit idea came from none other than Pac himself — via a rhyme.

    "Pac came up with that s**t," he says. "If you listen to 'Black Jesus,' he says 'Last wishes, n***as smoke my ashes.' So that was a request he had. Now how serious was he about it? [shrugs] We took that s**t serious."

    In addition to smoking his remains, The Outlawz also say they threw a few of Tupac's favorite things into the ocean, including weed, chicken wings and orange soda.

    "Pac loved that s**t," says E.D.I. Mean.

    Though the group claims Pac's mother and family were present at the memorial, a representative for the Shakur family tells TMZ that they were unaware of any plans to smoke the artist's remains and would never have agreed to such a thing.

    "[Afeni Shakur] would never participate in smoking her son," the family spokesperson said. "[The Outlawz] would have had to sneak the remains past the family member in charge of keeping an eye on the ashes at the memorial."

    Despite being less than stoked on The Outlawz claims, the Shakurs are reportedly not seeking legal action at this time.

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    Tupac Shakur (June 16, 1971 to September 13, 1996) was an American rapper and actor who came to embody the 1990s gangsta-rap aesthetic and in death became an icon symbolizing noble struggle. He has sold 75 million albums to date, making him one of the top-selling artists of all time. A sensitive, precociously talented and troubled soul, Tupac was gunned down in Las Vegas on September 7, 1996 and died six days later. His murder has never been solved. Tupac began his music career as a rebel with a cause to articulate the travails and injustices endured by many African-Americans. His skill in doing so made him a spokesperson not just for his own generation but for subsequent ones who continue to face the same struggle for equality. In life, his biggest battle was sometimes with himself. As fate drove him towards the nihilism of gangsta rap, and into the arms of the controversial Death Row Records impresario Suge Knight, the boundaries between Shakur's art and his life became increasingly blurred — with tragic consequences.

    Tupac’s Death
    Tupac died on September 13, 1996 of gunshot wounds inflicted six days prior. On September 7, Tupac was in Las Vegas with Suge Knight to watch a Mike Tyson fight at the MGM Grand hotel. There was a scuffle after the bout between a member of the Crips gang and Tupac. Knight, who was involved with the rival Bloods gang, and members of his entourage piled in. Later, as a car that Tupac was sharing with Knight stopped at a red light, a man emerged from another car and fired 13 shots, hitting Tupac in the hand, pelvis and chest. He later died at the hospital. His girlfriend Kidada and his mother Afeni were both with him in his final days.



    Tupac's body was cremated. Members of his old band, Outlawz, made the controversial claim that they had smoked some of his ashes in honor of him. His mother announced she would scatter her son's ashes in Soweto, South Africa, the "birthplace of his ancestors," on the 10th anniversary of his murder. She later changed the date to June 16, 1997 — Tupac's 26th birthday as well as the anniversary of the 1976 Soweto uprising.

    On March 9, 1997, six months after Tupac died, Biggie Smalls was killed in a drive-by shooting in Los Angeles; his murder has never been solved, either.

    Is Tupac Alive?
    Tupac Shakur died of gunshot wounds in 1996. However because his murder has never been solved, conspiracy theories have raged ever since. Fans have speculated that Tupac faked his death. On his album Life Goes On, Tupac rapped about his funeral; his song “I Ain’t Mad at Cha” was released two days after he died. There have been several reported potential Tupac “sightings” since his death, including in 2012 by Kim Kardashian.

    In September 2017, Suge Knight hinted that Tupac might be alive in an interview. "When I left that hospital me and 'Pac was laughing and joking. I don't see how someone can go from doing well to doing bad," said Knight, adding that “with Pac you never know” if he could be alive and living in secret somewhere.

    Tupac’s Albums and Songs
    Tupac has released a total of 11 platinum albums: four during his career, with seven more released posthumously. To date, Tupac has sold more than 75 million records worldwide. As of September 2017, the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) listed Tupac as the 44th top-selling artist of all time by album sales and streaming figures.



    '2Pacalypse Now'
    Tupac's first album as a solo artist was 2Pacalypse Now. Although it did not yield any hits, it sold a respectable 500,000 copies and established Tupac as an uncompromising social commentator on songs such as "Brenda's Got a Baby" — which narrates an underaged mother's fall into destitution — and "Soulja's Story," which controversially spoke of "blasting" a police officer and "droppin' the cop." The song was cited as a motivation for a real-life cop killing by a teenage car thief called Ronald Ray Howard, and was condemned by the then-U.S. Vice President Dan Quayle. "There is absolutely no reason for a record like this to be published," Quayle said. "It has no place in our society." With those words, Shakur's notoriety was guaranteed.

    'Strictly 4 My Niggaz'
    Tupac’s second album, Strictly 4 My Niggaz, dropped in February 1993. It continued in the same socially conscious vein as his debut. On the gold-certified single "Keep Ya Head Up," he empathized with "my sisters on the welfare," encouraging them to "please don't cry, dry your eyes, never let up." The video featured a cameo from his good friend, actress Jada Pinkett-Smith, whom Tupac had met in high school at the Baltimore School for the Arts in Maryland.

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    The album also featured contributions from Tupac's step-brother, Mopreme. Mopreme became a member of the hip-hop group Thug Life, which Tupac started and which released the album Thug Life: Volume 1 in 1994.

    'Me Against the World'
    When Tupac's third solo album came out on March 14, 1995, he was in jail. Its title, Me Against the World, could not have been more apt. It reached No. 1 in the Billboard 200 chart and is considered by many to be his magnum opus — "by and large a work of pain, anger and burning desperation" wrote Cheo H. Coker at Rolling Stone. But there was vulnerability, too — lead single, "Dear Mama," was a tear-jerking tribute to his mother, Afeni, that hit number 9 on the Billboard Hot 100 in April 1995.




    'All Eyez on Me'
    Tupac's debut for Death Row, the double-length album All Eyez on Me, came out in February 1996. With his new hip-hop group Outlawz debuting on the album, All Eyez on Me was an unapologetic celebration of the thug lifestyle, eschewing socially conscious lyrics in favour of gangsta-funk hedonism and menace. Dr Dre, who had pioneered g-funk with NWA, produced the album's first single, "California Love" — which went to No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100, and remains Tupac's best-known song.



    The third single from the album, "How Do You Want It," also reached No. 1. Within two months of its release, All Eyez on Me had been certified five-times double-platinum. It would eventually become diamond certified.

    'How Do U Want It'
    Released as a single in June 1996, “How Do You Want It” was more famous for its B track, “Hit ‘Em Up,” which aired Tupac’s West Coast feud with East Coast Bad Boy rivals. On the inflammatory song, Tupac spat venom at artists including Biggie Smalls, Lil Kim, Junior M.A.F.I.A. and Prodigy of Mobb Deep. The track seemed to chillingly presage Tupac’s death and the ensuing conspiracy theories:

    “Grab ya glocks, when you see Tupac; Call the cops, when you see Tupac, uh; Who shot me, but ya punks didn't finish; Now ya bout to feel the wrath of a menace,” he rapped.



    'Don Killuminati: The Seven Day Theory'
    Tupac's fifth album, Don Killuminati: The Seven Day Theory, was released in November 1996, just eight weeks after his death. It also reached No. 1 on the charts. Tupac recorded a total of six studio albums released posthumously, up to and including Pac's Life in 2006.

    Net Worth
    Tupac signed a $3.5 million contract with Death Row records in 1995 and, although he had sold $60 million in records, it was rumored he was in debt to the label at the time of his death. However since his death, Tupac has continued to sell millions of records. Forbes magazine estimated that Tupac’s estate took in $9 million in 2007 and $3.5 million as recently as 2010. Celebrity Net Worth estimates Tupac’s estate’s net worth as of 2017 to be $40 million.

    Movies
    Despite the incident with director Allen Hughes, Tupac continued his acting career — starring alongside Janet Jackson in 1993's Poetic Justice and Mickey Rourke in 1996's Bullet.

    A biopic on Tupac Shakur’s life, All Eyez on Me, directed by Benny Boom and starring Demetrius Shipp Jr., was released in 2017. Tupac’s close friend Jada Pinkett Smith, who is featured in the movie, later told reporters that she was a drug dealer when she met Tupac and that she found the “reimagining” of their relationship in the film “very hurtful.”

    "It wasn't just about, oh, you have this cute girl, and this cool guy, they must have been in this — nah, it wasn't that at all. It was about survival, and it had always been about survival between us," she said.

    On November 21, 2017, a six-part series, Biography Presents: Who Killed Tupac?, which follows civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump as he conducts an investigation into key theories behind Tupac's 1996 killing, will air on A&E.

    Poems and Book
    Before Tupac became a rapper, he wrote poetry. “The world moves fast and it would rather pass u by / than 2 stop and c what makes you cry," is one verse he wrote as a teenager that would eventually be published in the 2000 book, The Rose that Grew from Concrete.

    Did Tupac Have a Wife or Kids?
    Tupac was not married and had no children. At the time of his death he had a girlfriend, Kidada Jones, who is the daughter of Quincy Jones.

    When and Where Was Tupac Born?
    Tupac Shakur was born in Harlem, New York, on June 16, 1971.

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    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 03-30-2018 at 01:50 AM.

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