User Tag List

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 46 to 50 of 50

Thread: "Self-Made Graphical Design"

  1. #46
    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Germany/Cologne
    Posts
    33
    Than/ks (Given)
    27
    Than/ks (Received)
    7
    Likes (Given)
    29
    Likes (Received)
    20
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Interview with Corey Taylor No.3 / All Hope Is Gone 2008

    Four albums in and Iowan metal crew Slipknot are still terrorizing the mainstream. I have no idea how they ended up there: this is heavy, heavy stuff. But their latest disc, All Hope Is Gone, ended up at #1 on the Billboard charts, so they must be doing something right. With a renewed focus on his side, singer Corey Taylor is overjoyed at the album, his fans and recent victories like the aforementioned #1 and a headlining gig at Madison Square Garden. The masked men are hitting up Canada with some tour dates supporting the disc, so we took a minute to catch up with Taylor and all things knotty.


    What are you up to?

    I'm very, very tired. Today I got up at 6:45 because I had to take my son to school. I made breakfast and lunch for him, packed the lunch, took him to school, came home, cleaned the house, went and worked out, came back here, made myself lunch and now this is the second of two interviews I'm doing today.





    That's so not rock'n'roll.

    Well, neither am I. What are you going to do?





    So how's everything going in Slipknot land?

    It's going good, man. Everybody seems like they're in a good place, but you know how we are. That could all go away in a ten-second period. Just the fact that my phone's not blowing up with emergencies and panic attacks... I'm loving it.

    Now that All Hope Is Gone has had a bit of time to sit, how are you feeling about it?

    I go through these phases where I just have to put it on. At first, I would start with the front half; now I listen to the back half. It just sounds great. You know how that is, you get an album and fall in love with the first five songs and then you throw it on again and realize the last five songs are killer.



    With All Hope Is Gone, you returned to a bit more of a heavier sound. Did that just feel like the right thing to do?

    It just happened. We've never been the band that sits down and says, "We're going to sit down and make this kind of album." We throw shit at a wall and see what sticks, basically. With this album, everything felt dark. Everything felt really heavy.

    So would you say the album comes from a good place or a bad place?

    It's heavy, it's aggressive, it's dark, but you sound very positive about it.

    I think all great albums have that; it's all in the delivery. The lyrics I was writing were kind of both ways. I was raging on a political sense, and I've always had something against religion, but at the same time a lot of the stuff I was talking about started in a dark place but inevitably ended up in a positive place. I've always tried to put that in there, just saying,

    'Yeah, shit's fucked up right now but it can be okay and this is why and this is how.'

    So it's just something that I think is overlooked. We catch a lot of shit for being dark and whatnot but unless you're a real fan people miss the point where we're like, 'But it's alright. It's okay to be fucked up. It doesn't have to always be that way.' On this album, it was a great balance. That's what we finally found.

    And then the album goes to #1 on Billboard. What does that mean to you?

    It's very weird, man. When we were in the studio, I was the first one to say, "This album's going to be #1." Kinda just talking shit, but at the same time, you hope for it. You don't want to hope too much, but it's definitely one of those things on your list of "holy shit, this would be fucking awesome." So when it did go #1, it fucking blew me away. I was so fucking excited. I was really happy; I called everybody I knew and told them. I was very proud of that.

    Everybody talks about how it felt to win the Grammy. But fuck the Grammy. That's seven old people sitting in a room deciding whether or not they've heard of your band. For me, it's always been more about the albums, the gold albums, the platinum albums, people showing up at your show.

    That's your audience coming out and saying, "We fucking love what you do. We all do." The album was the same way; our fans gave that to us. We worked hard and we earned it but our fans gave that to us just as much as fucking SoundScan did.


    Speaking of the live show, you recently headlined Madison Square Garden. How did a band that sounds like you guys do that?





    That's a great fucking question, man. I don't even know, to be honest. I still trip on it. Leading up to it, it wasn't that big of a deal. I was like, "It's fucking Madison Square Garden, whatever.

    " Then you show up there and it's like, "Holy shit, it's Madison Square Garden." Seriously, when the curtain came up and we're standing there and I'm looking at the Garden and we had damn near sold it out, my jaw dropped.

    You couldn't see it because I was wearing a fucking mask, but it took me a second to get my shit together. I was nervous... I'm never nervous. It blew me away. When we finished the show, I came offstage, I just started balling. It was a heavy, heavy night for me. Nobody plays Madison Square Garden to make money, let's put it that way. It's very expensive to play. Someone told me it cost $50,000 just to turn the lights on in that place. So you don't really play there to make money. You play there because it's Madison Square Garden. It's a prestige gig. For me, it was just one more testament to how far we'd come.

    So you get offstage at Madison Square Garden and you're balling; how come?

    It was just big. I don't usually let shit like that get to me, but it was a big night, and it was a fucking great show. It was probably the best show we've ever had in New York. Everyone was just going insane. It sounded like everyone was singing every fucking word. It was just one of those golden moments. It was Maiden at Donington, it was Cheap Trick at Budokan, it was Aerosmith at the Texas Jam. It was fucking heavy.

    The grind of this gig can break you down and make you very cynical but there's moments like that that make you sit back and say, "I am living a dream. Are you kidding me?



    I get to do this for real?"

    So I was giddy. I was 14 in my room reading magazines, just going, "Fuck, some day." And that day was that day and it made me very happy; I went backstage and hugged all my bros. I was sick as a fucking dog that night too, that's what killed me. I had a sinus infection, I had an ear infection, a 100-degree fever and it just all went away.

    So where do you go from here though?

    You've done Madison Square Garden...

    Oh, it's gotta be downhill. Everything after this has just got to suck. [Laughs] In three years we'll be playing fucking clubs again, by my estimation. But honestly, I don't know. I definitely know where we want to go. Me and Clown have been conspiring for probably four or five months; we've got some ideas and some shit we want to do for the next album but... where do you go?

    You headline MSG and it's damn near sold out. Where do you go? I guess you just keep going.
    Something that's always cracked me up about you guys is you have these butt-ugly masks on and you look hideous and you have all these teenage girls screaming at you...

    Exactly! What the fuck is that? [Laughs] I love it, man.

    You must be laughing under the masks.

    You have no idea. I smirk damn near the whole time I'm wearing that fucking thing. If you could read some of the letters I get... it's un-fucking-believable some of the shit these people ask me

    When does grown men wearing masks become absurd?

    I'm not sure, to be honest. We probably could ask Gene Simmons. I don't know... That's a good question. As long as it means the same to us as it always has I don't think there's a time limit on it. For us, it's not about the bullshit; it's about the content behind it.

    At least that's the way it is for me. For me, it's always had much more of an artistic bent than anything else. So when it starts to become Chewbacca from Star Wars it's time to walk. As long as it still feels right and it means the same and it's not hokey and not bullshit. As long as we don't jump the shark, I think it'll be okay.

    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.jimdo.com
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 02-16-2018 at 11:04 AM.

  2. #47
    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Germany/Cologne
    Posts
    33
    Than/ks (Given)
    27
    Than/ks (Received)
    7
    Likes (Given)
    29
    Likes (Received)
    20
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default



    What about Death Row and Bad Boy doing something together?
    That's as together as we can get. For money.

    What about getting together as black men?



    We are together as black men, they over there, we over here. If we really gonna live in peace, we all can't be in the same room, man.

    Because Yellow M&Ms don't move with green M&M's. I mean, you don't put M&M peanuts with M&Ms plain. You hear me?



    But we all black, brother...

    We all black and everything...but I'm not talking about division. I'm talking about realism. You don't hang with us. You live different than we live. We all brothers, but we don't all live the same. Even in a real family. I don't live with my mother, I don't live with my brother. We all come together for Thanksgiving we all get together for Christmas. If any of them call I don't wish nothing bad to the nigga. They call and say why don't we do a celebrity this this this in my neighborhood, I'm wit it.

    What about if they say they’re concerned about this hostility that’s out there that people are feeding into. Can you and Suge and Puffy and Biggie sit down?
    But that's corny. That's just for everybody else to be calm. For everybody else they could understand what's going on. They just wanna hear what the conversation is about.
    I know my life's not in danger. Suge know his life not in danger. I don't feel as if I gotta worry about them. They shouldn't feel like they gotta worry about me. Puffy wrote me while I was in jail. I wrote him back. I told him I don't got no problems with him.

    Even if there is no beef, don't you think it would be better to be clarified?
    What's that gonna stop if we sit down and have a talk. They know they can sit down. Niggas can start some shit and say whatever they want. Cause at the some point the Nation of Islam or somebody is gonna sit them down and we can make peace. That's why niggas is not being held responsible for the things that they do wrong. I don't want no problems, I don't want it to be fighting, I don't want no arguing, I just wanna make my money. You can't tell me I'm gonna sit down and hug and kiss niggas to make everybody else feel good. Straight up, there is no beef. If there was a beef niggas would know. *They know it ain't no beef. Puffy was at the fight [in Vegas, where Suge has a club].

    We in the Hip-Hop generation represent leadership. In the absence of us taking some stands, if anybody like you who's very visible, or Puffy or Suge saying, “There is no beef," then regular people who don’t understand that are gonna continue to think that there is a beef.
    I believe in fate.

    In Faith?
    Fate. Fate. I know niggas didn't want to sit down and have no conversation until Puffy started fearing for his life. I was in jail nigga. Living in jail when everybody was having this beef. One West Coast nigga in New York, maximum security prison. Nobody want to have no sit downs then. Had to deal with my struggle every day. Some shit like that.

    What did you learn from your experience? It was 11 and half months or something like that...
    I learned that fear is stronger than love. And no matter how much love I got for my peoples, man, if somebody else making them scared, my people gonna do me in. And I learned that a lot of people support me for just being me. And I have to give back. And a lot of people look up to me to give back. So I have to be able to give back. But I can't give back if I'm broke. So I have to be about my business and my money now. Before I wanted to talk and explain what I'm doing. I'm not doing that no more. Nobody's gonna understand me. I just came up with that. After reading what people was writing in VIBE. Ain't no need for me to make people try to understand me. I'm gonna be out here and do my music, do some movies. Try to give back to the hood any way I can. I'ma give out food every Christmas, I'ma give out turkeys every Thanksgiving. I'ma have a Mother’s Day program.

    I think you’re oversimplifying. 99 percent of the letters from readers supported you. A lot of people dissed the people who responded to you.
    I seen it, I read every VIBE. I had a subscription, man. Every article you did, I read every VIBE that came out. Then I started seeing this shit, I was like God damn. They can just say that. Puffy talking about, “If you a thug, you need to be a thug forever." And VIBE just printed it.

    I’m not accountable for what they did.
    It's not the same situation now where I can just speak. I don't care about them. It's because of them I'm invigorated and I'm rejuvenated to do what I got to do.

    You said you were moving away from...
    I'm striving for that. Every day I'm striving for that. Every day. You won't see me all up on TV getting high. I'm not making it where the kids... I'm not making it like I'm glorifying getting high. That's a hell of [a] motherfucking thing, to shake an addiction like that. But shit, I gotta do what I gotta do.

    You said it’s gonna get deep. What did you mean by that?
    It's gonna get deep, man, because... Um, what the East is doing, they think is... I understand it. I'm from there.

    It’s really like unifying the East coast. Because it was really like, in a slump. But they're doing it wrong. Cause they're using the West coast as a rallying cry. And they making it look like WE are the perpetrators of this big East coast -- West coast thing. They never had no problems. They could come out here and perform and they clap. We go out there and niggas is booing. That Source Awards, that's what start it. Not start it, but that Source Awards is what put it to a new level. They was booing and shit. Me personally being from both coasts, but I represent the West coast, I think that's disrespectful.

    What about Suge making a comment about Puffy at this year's Source Awards. Wasn't that kinda disrespectful?
    No, that's not disrespectful. That's his opinion and that's real. All he was doing was saying if they tired of having a manager shake his ass in their video. We don't do like that on the Row. That's real.

    Can’t that contribute to the whole East-West thing?
    Not as much as it does when y'all niggas... Um, when niggas goin' on the radio. It ain't about the West Coast, it's all about NY. Boo hoo hoo. Fuck the west, we the best. We started it. All them other niggas.

    I be listening.

    Suge has got the heart to say it in front of you. All these other muthafuckas been saying it behind our backs.

    By getting deep, to you, does that mean that some violence or death...
    I told you what I want. I want it to go on records. Let's make some money for the hood. The hood is [what] need us now. Fuck a nigga ego. I don't care. I could put all that shit aside and we could make records. And give money to the hood. Build some community centers with this. We can make it where we have block parties. Where we have Death Row and Bad Boy have rapping contests all over the hood and boom boom boom. We could do whatever.

    Tell me about your album, It's called All Eyez on Me.
    All Eyez on Me. The first single is “California Love”, with me and Dre and Roger Troutman. And then I got a single coming out two weeks after that with me and Snoop called “Two of America's Most Wanted”. “California Love” is just giving it up for California. You got “Crooklyn”, you got “Crooklyn” [Part] 1 and [Part] 2. You know, this is our “Crooklyn”. “Two of America's Most Wanted”, that's about me and Suge and our cases and our problems. We two of America's most wanted.

    You mean me and Snoop?
    Me and Snoop.

    Can you explain the title of the album?
    Everybody lookin’ at me right now. The police lookin’ at me, the females, my enemies, reporters, people that want me to fall, people that want me to make it. My mama. In jail, the guards. Everybody lookin’ at me. All eyes on me.

    How does that make you feel?
    It make me feel good. I like the challenge. I know I gotta get out here and put some good work out.

    I'm really into this album cause I want it to sell. I’m really trying to break some records with this. Cause no rapper's ever put out a double album. It's never been done before.

    How many songs did you say was on it?
    It's 28 songs. All brand new songs. All new. None of it was written in jail. All of it happened soon as I got out.

    You once said you were gonna go in a different direction. Is there any like introspection on this album, like you mentioned Marvin Gaye in the last interview...
    No. This album is like, hey....I never did an album like this before.

    Can you describe it in a phrase?
    Relentless. It's like so uncensored. Aw maaaan. All my albums to me be sad. When I was in jail in New York, niggas was like, “Man, come out with an album that's not like you're dying.” The reason I did an album Me Against the World is so I could do an album like this. This is an upbeat album. It's about celebrating my life. Celebrating being alive. Then I got this Outlaw Immortals project. That's the new Thug Life project.

    So Thug Life is not dead?
    It's not dead. It's Psych and Mopreme and some other homies from Thug Life. The project I'm involved with is called Outlaw Immortals. That's what happens when you pass thug life.


    Wow. You have a single with Faith [Evans], I understand.
    [Laughter] Yeah, sure do.

    What’s that called?
    "Wonda Why They Call U Bitch?"

    What's the song about?
    Exactly what it sound like. Everybody's wondering why we call females bitches. We don't call all females bitches. It's just certain things and we give examples. Leaving the key with her mother and she's fucking and she's just out. She's just a tramp.

    How did you hook up with Faith, given all this stuff you've been talking about?
    We met in the club and bumped it. Me and Faith don't have no problems.

    But you can’t talk about it on the record?
    Naw. Everybody that need to know know. [high-pitched laughter]

    The rumors about you and Faith... Uh, spending a lot of time outside the studio.
    You mean the rumor that I fucked her? Heh heh heh.



    I’d rather turn the tape recorder off if you gonna say that, bro.
    [Laughing hysterically] I ain't gonna answer that shit, man. You know I don't kiss and tell, man.



    Is there anything you wanna add? Cause this is real deep.
    I wanna add that man... I want niggas in NY to not feed into this shit.



    What about niggas on the West coast?
    They not feeding in, they about their money and shit. I'm talking about the East coast. Cause I love a lot of niggas out there. I love a lot of people out there.

    http://www.bilder-upload.eu/upload/6...1517643409.jpg

    I got a lot of support from NY when I was in jail. That's really important to me that NY don't think I'm trippin on you. This is just something that's been in me for a long time. They just dissing us. I can't take it no more. But I love all my fans, all the people that supported me, down for me. People like Freddie Foxxx who stayed down for me. People like Latifah and Treach and I heard that Smif-N-Wessun gave me some love on my album. I got nothing but love for them.

    But see people like Mobb Deep...stupid. Thug Life we still living it. That's what gonna start this whole new... What you see, this Outlaw Immortal shit...that's what started this.

    Biggie and them being in VIBE talking all that shit. Stretch, Fab Five...all them people. All that. That's what started all this. You hear what I said in my interview, I'm chilling. So-that's what it is. This Outlaw Immortal is off the hook, kid. Off the hook. There's a song on there called “Hit ‘Em Up” that's gonna be one of the most talked about. You remember like Ice Cube's “No Vaseline”, “Hit ‘Em Up” [is] gonna be like that. It's coming out a couple months after my album. On my record label and Death Row.

    What’s that called?
    Euthanasia Records.

    Why that title?
    I fell in love with that word. I feel like that's me. I'm gonna die, I just wanna die without pain. I don’t wanna die, but if I gotta go I wanna go without pain.

    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.jimdo.com
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 02-17-2018 at 06:19 AM.

  3. #48
    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Germany/Cologne
    Posts
    33
    Than/ks (Given)
    27
    Than/ks (Received)
    7
    Likes (Given)
    29
    Likes (Received)
    20
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default



    A Dutch photographer who has spent two decades chronicling the lives of residents on a Los Angeles social housing project has won one of international photography’s most prestigious prizes.


    Dana Lixenberg was named winner of the 20th Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation prize at a ceremony in London on Thursday evening.

    'Are you FBI?' – how I captured the everyday life of gangland LA

    She won the £30,000 prize for her project Imperial Courts (1993-2015), the name of the social housing project Lixenberg first visited after LA’s race riots of 1992. Lixenberg kept visiting, photographing, filming and recording the mostly African-American residents as their lives panned out.

    Brett Rogers, the director of the Photographers’ Gallery in London and chair of the judges, said they had been impressed by the artist’s “comprehensive and measured” series of photographs: “Lixenberg’s work is simultaneously understated and emphatic, reflecting a cool sobriety, which allows her subjects to own the gaze and their contexts without sentimentality or grandiosity.”

    The photographs have been admired as a contrast to the often one-dimensional, negative and stereotyped images of communities with gangland violence.

    Lixenberg has said her approach was to slow things down. She told the Guardian: “I don’t want to use a person to illustrate a story. I want each image to be its own self-contained story, and then together, as a body, they present the community in a certain way.

    “It’s not the wild west, with people shooting each other, but people do live with a lot of loss and death.”

    Lixenberg said the community was initially wary of her, asking if she was with the FBI, but that quickly changed. “Over the years I’ve become part of the furniture, the picture lady!”



    Lixenberg, who is based in New York and Amsterdam, is known for long-term projects about individuals and communities on the margins of society, as well as her magazine portraits of Puff Daddy, Prince, Tupac Shakur, Eminen and many others.

    Imperial Courts was first published as a book, and is also a web documentary co-created with Eefje Blankevoort.

    She was chosen from a shortlist that also featured the French conceptual artist Sophie Calle, whose work explores her response following the deaths of her cat, mother and father. The other artists are Awoiska van der Molen, with large, strange, black and white landscapes; and Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs, for a multimedia display documenting their journey from Switzerland to Mongolia.

    All four displays of work will be at the Photographers’ Gallery until 11 June, after which it will tour to the MMK in Frankfurt and the Aperture Foundation in New York.

    The judges for this year’s prize were curators Susan Bright and Karolina Lewandowska, artist Pieter Hugo, and the director of the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation, Anne-Marie Beckmann.

    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.jimdo.com
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 02-17-2018 at 03:57 AM.

  4. #49
    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Germany/Cologne
    Posts
    33
    Than/ks (Given)
    27
    Than/ks (Received)
    7
    Likes (Given)
    29
    Likes (Received)
    20
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default



    Artbound's editorial team has reviewed and rated the most compelling weekly articles. After putting two articles up for a vote, the audience chose this article to be made into a short-format documentary.




    Thumb through a stack of major Los Angeles hip-hop albums from the late 1980s through mid-1990s and you might notice one name credited on all of them: Michael Miller. During the West Coast's hip-hop scene's ascension into global fame, the photographer ended up being the go-to lensman for countless album covers and publicity stills. Miller's output is staggering, and would be hard to believe if not for his recent, self-published book documenting all of it: "West Coast Hip-Hop: A History In Pictures."



    In it, Miller compiles literal portraits of California hip-hop during one of its most vibrant eras. That includes the giants of the scene such as Tupac, Cypress Hill and Snoop Dogg but also lesser-known artists such as the Whooliganz, Funkdoobiest and a group originally called the Atban Klann (better known by their later name: Black Eyed Peas).

    http://www.bilder-upload.eu/upload/7...1518863349.png

    Michael Miller | Photo by Oliver Wang.Michael Miller | Photo by Oliver Wang.
    Miller grew up on the Westside, attending Santa Monica public schools while living in Malibu, back when he says it was still "really country." His teen years were impeccably timed; not only was he classmates with Rob Lowe and Sean Penn, but as an avid skater and surfer, Miller ended up befriending members of the Dogtown skating crew, the Z-Boys, especially Tony Alva.

    Miller graduated from UCLA in the mid 1980s and decamped for Europe, first to compete in downhill skiing before ending up in Paris, where he briefly made ends meet by painting houses. His entry into photographer was a bit of a fluke, he says. He and a friend, "were after one thing and it [was] to date models and it's where my photography first started." Whatever his original motives, Miller quickly proved gifted for the craft and within months, was traveling across Europe to shoot campaigns for Cacharel and other major fashion houses.

    When he returned home to L.A., his fashion work caught the eye of record labels such as EMI and by the late 1980s, he was shooting artists as varied as girl rockers The Go-Go's and Heart, to jazz players such as Stan Getz and Herb Alpert. Miller, however, grew up a hip-hop fan, listening to 1580 AM, KDAY, the first 24 hour hip-hop station in the country. As a teen, he used to spin late-night shows on KBOO, literally an underground radio station housed in a Malibu basement. In 1989, he snapped his first rap-related cover, for the original N.W.A. group member, Arabian Prince and his debut solo album. That began Miller's long history of shooting the key figures on the West Coast rap scene, thoroughly compiled in "West Coast Hip-Hop" and the subject of his in-progress documentary about the influence of this region's hip-hop culture on the rest of the world.

    "West Coast Hip-Hop" includes extensive background testimonials to almost all the photos, providing crucial personal and historical context. During the course of our interview, we asked him to expand on the backstories to a few of his most iconic images and here's what he shared.

    Miller first met Coolio through rapper WC and Warner Bros. hired him to shoot the cover for Coolio's debut album. LP cover for Coolio's "It Takes a Thief" (Warner Bros., 1994) | Original photo by Michael Miller.
    MM: I'm living over here on Stanley [Ave.]...and there's a knock at my door and Coolio comes with his hair like that and I go, "a star is born." Coolio is gangster. He was gnarly. I mean, he was a great person, but his face...look at the image. It's scary! But again, he loved me. I did all his covers.

    Where did you take that photo? It took me a long time to realize it wasn't some kind of abstract illustration; it's razor wire.

    MM: That was a great demo[lition] yard. [I told Coolio], "get on the ladder, put your head in the barbed wire, just put your head in the middle of the barbed wire.

    http://www.bilder-upload.eu/upload/b...1518855890.png

    " I got in the barbed wire and shot through it. It was spontaneous, it wasn't a premeditated photograph, it was "let's go." The art director, his name was Erwin [Gorostiza], a couple of years later he tells me, "oh, the photo won awards." He never told me [at the time].

    regulateMiller was hired at the last minute by Def Jam head, Lyor Cohen, to shoot the cover for Warren G's debut, "Regulate...The G-Funk Era." Miller had to fly directly home from New York after his meeting with Cohen in order to make the shoot the next morning. They originally had planned to shoot Warren in a location that Miller had chosen but the rapper had other plans. Album cover for Warren G's "Regulate...G Funk Era" (Def Jam, 1994) | Original photo by Michael Miller.
    MM: I got an old naval demo yard locked down in San Pedro. Acres of gas towers and broken down warehouses. Warren's all mellow and he [insists], "I got to do a shot on 21st and Lewis where I grew up. That's going to be my cover." So we drive to 21st and Lewis [in Long Beach] and it's in the middle of the day. The worst possible light you can have. I just shoot. You just gotta go for it. The art direction was unbelievable. [Director] Steve Carr put a black strip on top and reversed the palm trees. The cover's one of my favorites. They really nailed it. They added another photo of them on a wall. I shot [that] in the alley by his house.

    They all grew up there. There's so many rappers and superstars that were on 19th and Lewis and all over the place. Snoop did his first "Doggystyle" video, with all the dogs running after him, in that alley.

    In 1989, Miller was hired to shoot an album cover for WC and the Maad Circle. The shoot ended up being on L.A.'s downtown Skid Row. W.C. on L.A. skid row, 1989 | Photo by Michael Miller.

    MM: Every shoot, there's a concept. I try and get that out of the artist. WC came to me and was like "I want a census worker counting people on Skid Row." So I went down to skid row at 12:30 at night and it was a gnarly situation. All of the sudden, out of the shadows, there's this dude sweaty, just running by full speed, "fuck you Hollywood motherfuckers, get the fuck out of here, I'ma fucking kick your ass." We walk around the fence and he's throwin' up a set and WC's like, "yo homie! That's my crew!" And they started talking and -- boom -- best friends. Immediately, it just switched. These guys are intense. But when you're down with them, it's just all love. We ended up becoming buddies with Scrap Loc. He's in that photo.

    Many of Miller's photo shoots with rappers happened at the beginning of their career. With Tupac Shakur however, the rapper was nearing the height of his fame; he was anything but a newcomer. Tupac Shakur, 1994 | Photo by Michael Miller
    MM: He was huge. I was nervous to say the least. I tried to keep my enthusiasm under control. That one, we were over by, I think it was 51st and Santa Fe and it was an old train yard. I got a lot of great shots of him that day. After this shot, there there was abandoned train tracks and railroad cars. We went inside, my assistant got Burger King. We went inside and we all kicked it in the old train.

    Then we went over to Elysian Park and it was dangerous so when things got a little heavy, we'd just move. Nothing dramatic happened, we ever had any physical altercations but we did have gang situations where it was gnarly. With Tupac, he attracted everyone. Like, "Tupac's in the neighborhood, let's go!" If some gangsters came out of the woodwork, he knew. He'd be like, "let's go. Hop in the van, let's get out of here."
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 02-17-2018 at 04:49 PM.

  5. #50
    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Germany/Cologne
    Posts
    33
    Than/ks (Given)
    27
    Than/ks (Received)
    7
    Likes (Given)
    29
    Likes (Received)
    20
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Photographing a Los Angeles Community for 22 Years

    George Pitts
    Nov 19, 2015



    Imperial Courts, 1993–2015, the long awaited photography book by Dutch photographer Dana Lixenberg and published by Roma,

    features some of her finest, and most eloquent photographs, suffused with compassion, austere visual beauty, and a tender attention toward the wide scope of individuals who comprise the Imperial Courts community in Los Angeles.

    Short-listed for PhotoBook of the Year by the 2015 Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards, the copious tome is the culmination of years of diligent work.

    In March 1993, after traveling to South Central Los Angeles on assignment for the Dutch weekly magazine Vrij Nederland to document a story on the “destruction and rebuilding” of the vicinity in the aftermath of the Rodney King verdict, photographer

    Dana Lixenberg was moved to develop what became a 22-year effort capturing in portraits, members of the community at the Imperial Courts housing project in Watts, Los Angeles. Enabled first through meeting The Black Carpenters association, a group of contractors and activists, and through them, a more auspicious meeting with the late Tony Bogard, leader of the

    Imperial Courts PJ Watts Crips, Lixenberg was introduced to a neighborhood, the Imperial Courts projects, and a community of people, who gradually became the subjects of her striking volume.

    A photo essay of her earliest portraits from Imperial Courts, accompanied by a poem, People of Watts, by playwright Ntozake Shange, was first published in the November 1993 edition of Vibe magazine when I served as photography director
    Lixenberg’s tough non-pandering aesthetic assisted Vibe in establishing its visual tone and often poignant photographic vocabulary, which complemented and contradicted the slicker celebrity and fashion-oriented content.

    When we realized that her manner of capturing the most daring musicians in an unvarnished and uniquely powerful way, we assigned her cover and feature shoots with figures such as Tupac Shakur, The Notorious B.I.G., Prince, Eminem, and others. Her portraits of Tupac alone were the source of numerous murals worldwide, and to this day proliferate on T-shirts everywhere. And these were not overly slick images; but like the Imperial Courts photos, were true toward his depth and obvious vulnerability.

    Imperial Courts is a modest yet epic 22-year project compiled in a thoughtful, exquisitely designed monograph. An all black-and-white opus, and although a far cry from photographer Taryn Simon’s all color first book, The Innocents, Lixenberg’s volume can also be construed as a conceptual effort that draws simultaneous attention to the race of the subjects and the race, and perhaps gender, of the photographer.

    The book spreads in Imperial Courts are meticulously arranged. In many of them, the juxtapositions of the photographs create a fiction, a compelling story that one can plainly see, yet subtly plotted to hide the evidence of narrative intention.

    The single photo spreads with its luxury of a blank page beside it, amplify the fascination with the one image, which is carefully selected, such as the rigorously simple “Leslie and Ashley (2013),” one of her finest pictures, which appears familiar yet strange at the same time.

    Subtle understatement is contrasted with severe understatement: still life versus portrait, streetscape drily rendered versus black-and-white head shot that together resonate more like a film than a traditional layout.

    Silently heroic postures are paired or shown along with the quiet banal truths of trees, outdoor architecture, and the mysteries of presence observed without shrill exaggeration.
    Overly familiar tropes such as sexiness, and comparable assertions of body language are shown in more frequency in the moving genealogy, with its smaller-scaled pictures and postage size thumbnails running beside them.

    The genealogy pages also demonstrate a seeming wider range of settings throughout the housing project. Yet virtually all Lixenberg’s subjects in this volume exhibit a cool sobriety that keeps stylized swagger at arm’s length. It is impossible to characterize the presence and stunning quietude emanating from these individuals.

    It is a visual signature of Lixenberg’s that she has sometimes described as “deliberately undramatic.” Ironically by stripping back the conscious postering common to many of us, she often arrives at a fresh or more shrewd way of idealizing her subjects Innovative in its capture and depiction of emotion, and in its modest defiance toward cultural stereotypes, either cloying or sentimentally heroic, Imperial Courts finds a middle way to commemorate a community,

    through a persuasive subtlety as opposed to the brutal clarity of earnest photojournalism, which accommodates the collective humanity of the denizens of the housing project. The book is an advance on how specifically people of color are represented in cultural media. Lixenberg stands in that ambiguous position of ‘getting’ the ordinary dimensions of a racial minority, simultaneously with her formal apprehension of the diverse beauty of a people.

    Race is writ large and small, even in this disciplined, understated and complex appreciation; but in sustaining her vigorously cool expansive aesthetic, Lixenberg restores this community’s privilege to be flawed, capable of falling victim to addiction, murder, disappearing never to be seen again; yet welcoming toward a photographer from another planet, a sincere witness, capable of great art, willing to wait and wait, then snap to work.

    George Pitts is an assistant professor at Parsons The New School for Design, and a photographer and writer living in Brooklyn, N.Y. Previously, he was director of photography at LIFE Magazine and Vibe Magazine. You can see more of his work here.

    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.jimdo.com
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 02-17-2018 at 04:48 PM.

Similar Threads

  1. **Post Ya Favo Makaveli Lyricz**
    By BuCa in forum Lyrics
    Replies: 49
    Last Post: 09-16-2014, 09:18 PM
  2. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-08-2012, 08:41 PM
  3. Song that made Pac cry on his deathbed
    By treytyson96 in forum Makaveli Discussions
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 12-04-2011, 09:06 AM
  4. "Made Niggaz" - Opinions Please
    By mweb in forum Makaveli Theories
    Replies: 56
    Last Post: 10-01-2011, 08:48 AM
  5. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-18-2011, 12:11 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •