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  1. #31
    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
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    Story about Michael Miller Photography / Relationship with Thug Life Vol. 1

    Michael Miller and Paul Stewart had capped a successful Kickstarter project and planned a digital imprint of their book, a collection of photographs from the golden era of West Coast hip hop, called West Coast Hip Hop: A History In Photos. But the coffee table book garnered enough interest for a hard cover edition and fine art print show, opening this Saturday at Known Gallery.


    "I started shooting in 1988, in Paris," says Miller. "I was actually painting houses and I just happened to meet Peter Lindbergh, the world-renowned fashion photographer. He gave me my first professional camera. I helped him out on a few shoots." Miller had his first big job with Cacharel, a huge French fashion brand. He shot Linda Evangelista, Karen Mulder, and Elaine Erwin, some of the era's biggest supermodels.

    But getting access to supermodels would prove simple compared to the likes of Tupac Shakur, Cypress Hill and Ice Cube.

    Never-Before-Seen Photos of Tupac and Eazy-E From New Book West Coast Hip Hop: A History In Photos
    Michael Miller
    However, Miller, being an L.A. native and passionate hip hop fan paired with Stewart, then a street promoter who later would head Def Jam's west coast branch. The two connected the dots and forged a mutually beneficial working relationship. "The artists had to know you," Miller explains. "I met DJ Muggs when he just got off the DMC World DJ Championship, the largest in the world. His roommate was DJ Aladdin. This was all before he started Cypress Hill."

    Miller scanned over 3000 images for the book, with only 70 making the cut. Admittedly he included a few photos that were less technically clean than close to his heart. West Coast Hip Hop: A History in Photos includes exclusive stories and images. Many times, he eschewed traditional studio settings for L.A. landscapes; perfect lighting for amazing, pre-Photoshop double exposures. Miller caught The Alkoholiks in a liquor store cooler on Sunset (the cover of 1993's 21 + Over), Dre and Snoop on the boards for The Chronic, and -- wait for it -- Eazy-E with a skateboard.

    "That image is close to me, because I grew up skateboarding," explains Miller. "It happens to be a Natas Kaupas deck. Natas gave me that board. I was waiting for Eazy, just skating around and he showed up and he hopped on it for a second. He didn't actually skate, but it was cool."
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 11-17-2017 at 02:08 AM.

  2. #32
    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
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    Despite a packed schedule of advertising jobs, being able to work on the fly helped Miller assimilate to the artists and their crews. He shot covers for the likes of Priority, Death Row, Jive and EMI Records for 20 years, essentially documenting the careers of Coolio, Mack 10, Westside Connection, DJ Quik, Too Short, Ice T, Yo-Yo, Funk Dubious, King Tee, Suga Free, Supa Fly, House of Pain and Snoop Dogg, from demo to full rotation on KDAY.

    Never-Before-Seen Photos of Tupac and Eazy-E From New Book West Coast Hip Hop: A History In Photos
    Michael Miller

    "We'd have a game plan. So when I got down to doing the work, even though I'd take Tupac to East L.A. to Pasadena and back to downtown, it worked out great. You've got Tupac with the tombstones and the guns," says Miller as he shows a particularly iconic portrait of Shakur against a graffiti wall. "I haven't really been showing people this book -- 90% of these images have been in my archives and storage. Never been used."



    The print show and book signing at Known promises to bring out quite a few of the personalities in the book and plenty of their old and new fans. Even for those who grew up seeing Miller's images of N.W.A, Dub C, Warren G and Sir Mix A lot, it will be an introduction to the photographer himself as he's been behind the scenes until now. "Mike hasn't been bragging about having this huge body of work, so people don't really know, explains Stewart, now publisher at his own Over the Edge books. " This was my dream book."

    A History In Pictures is a 200-page 9" x 12" coffee table book that collects Miller's images of many of hip-hop's most important artists (e.g. Tupac Shakur, Ice Cube, Eazy-E, Snoop Dogg, Too $hort etc.) in their '90s prime. After launching his
    career in fashion, Los Angeles-native Miller photographed his first hip-hop artist, Arabian Prince, in the late '80s. His work on a Stussy campaign won the admiration of DJ Muggs, who asked Miller

    to shoot his new group, Cypress Hill. And the rest, as they say, is history. Featuring the stories behind the photos from Miller himself as well as a foreword
    by Paul "DJ P" Stewart - former Pharcyde manager, A&R wizard, and all around West Coast hip-hop man in the mix - it's an essential Westside document

    Download
    Michael Miller’s photographs capture a unique era of West Coast culture, combining the emerging genres of gangster rap, skateboard culture, Los Angeles street culture, and the iconic personalities who help turn West Coast rap into a global phenomenon.
    Capturing intimate portraits of hip-hop legends 2pac, Snoop Dogg, Ice Cube, Eazy-E, Cypress Hill, as well as iconic advertising campaigns with street fashion giant, Stussy, Michael Miller photographs hearken back to a pivotal moment in history where he took rap, surf, skate, punk, and street fashion fused into one image.
    The Los Angeles-based photographer has worked in the entertainment and music industry for over 25 years, with a portfolio of over 300 major record covers, iconic supermodels of the ‘90s, and some of the biggest names in rap and jazz.


    Influenced by the techniques of Peter Lindberg, Paulo Roversi and Javier Vallhonrat, Miller has developed a unique method of cross-processing film and different chemical baths for his black and white photographs. A graduate of UCLA with a B.A. in Film and Television, Miller moved to Paris and met top agent Rene Bosne. With Bosne’s mentorship, Miller began to shoot photographs, gradually gaining jobs shooting models for John Casablancas’ agency. After moving to Barcelona to shoot campaigns fro Cacharel Paris, Miller returned to Los Angeles in 1988 to shoot for Herb Ritts’ agency, Visages. Gaining recognition within the fashion industry, the music world took notice, and by the end of 1988, Miller photographed his first rapper, Arabian Prince.




    For West Coast Hip-Hop: A History in Pictures at FIFTY24SF Gallery, Michael Miller will be presenting a series of his iconic early 1990?s hip-hop photographs, including numerous photos of 2pac, Ice Cube, Eazy-E, Snoop Dogg, Warren G, as well as photos of unique historical perspectives on Los Angeles street culture. Coinciding with Miller’s exhibition, we will have famed San Francisco musicians, Tommy Guerrero and ORB DJing the opening on Friday, April 27, 2012. On Saturday, April 28, from 2—4PM, Miller will be signing copies of his West Coast Hip-Hop: A History in Pictures at our FIFTY24SF Gallery.
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 11-17-2017 at 01:25 AM.

  3. #33
    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
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    A hip-hop gamechanger, a revolutionary's son, an actor, an ex-convict, a platinum-selling artist, a sensitive truth-teller, a "Thug Life" tattoo-sporting tough guy, a black man, a martyr – Tupac Shakur was all these things and more. It was never a matter of whether or not the 25-year-old musician deserved a biopic so much as why it took so damned long to make it happen. (Would that it were so simple: You can read a detailed history of the project's long, winding and incredibly bumpy road to becoming a reality.) There was just one anxiety-inducing question that kept buzzing in the back of our skulls: Was this eventual big-screen take on Shakur going to be an epic look at a complicated legend's life and times – a Gandhi of gangsta rap iconography – or merely a slightly larger Lifetime TV movie filled with hysterics and greatest-hits moments. We now have an answer. It was not the one we wanted.

    Less a biopic than a pop-up Wikipedia page, All Eyez on Me covers the bases of Shakur's story: the early schooling in Shakespeare and militant sloganeering, the formative mistrust of authority, his big break with the Digital Underground, the discovery of his voice, the near-derailment due to his shooting and scandals and incarceration, and the self-destructive free-for-all of the Death Row years. As a bonus, you also get characters who exist solely to spout exposition and/or infomercial taglines ("Well, Interscope was founded as a haven for artistic expression!") and the sort of clunky, nuance-free filmmaking that keeps pushing the Camp-o-meter into the red. What's M.I.A. is a real sense of what made Shakur so vital – then and now – or any idea why we superfans and stans still rightfully look at his work as a hip-hop high point. You want the movie equivalent of "Hit 'Em Up." You get something that would've been deemed unfit for Loyal to the Game.

    Don't blame Demetrius Shipp Jr., the newcomer who nabbed the Tupac role. Never mind that he bears an uncanny resemblance to the late Shakur; what's impressive is how he manages to nail the rap star's rage and swagger, the street smarts and the crazy-sexy-cool vibe. Even when director Benny Boom and a trio of screenwriters keep weighing him down with dramatic dead weight, Shipp keeps his head up. He does his best to convince you that this was a man who was deeply conflicted about whether to start a movement or just keep sipping the Moët. If he doesn't quite have the star power that the real Tupac did, the actor does have screen presence to spare.



    And when the movie briefly allows Shipp to get onstage and drop a few verses, you wish it hadn't skimped on the actual musical aspects in favor of half-baked attempts at pathos involving Shakur's mother Afeni (The Walking Dead's Danai Gurira.) Or having a didactic journalist (Hill Harper) play devil's advocate with an imprisoned Shakur over everything from rap lyrics to responsibility, social consciousness to C. Dolores Tucker's tsk-tsking. Or questionably staging an encounter with Ayanna Jackson, who'd accuse the musician of sexual assault, like a slo-mo R&B video. By the time Suge Knight (Dominic L. Santana) enters stage right and we start slouching towards tragedy, All Eyez on Me already feels like it's been looking at its subject with one eye closed.


    Which, for those of us who've been waiting for this for a long time, is a major letdown. Tupac rapped about shooting his enemies and sleeping with their wives; he also sang that "even as a crack fiend, Mama/you always was a black queen, Mama." Any attempt at contextualizing why or how that mix of in-your-face aggression and sensitive hood journalism came from the same place gets buried under sloppy sentimentality and soap operatics. This is a movie that's content to superficially scroll through hits and misses and headlines without diving deeper. It's biopic-making by numbers, and for anyone happy enough to simply see Shakur get the sinner-saint screen treatment, maybe that's enough. As for the people banking on Tupac getting his own Straight Outta Compton-level movie, well – we ain't mad at cha, All Eyez on Me. Just majorly disappointed.

  4. #34
    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
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    The call came in on the radio just after 11:15 p.m.: Shots had been fired near the intersection of Flamingo and Koval, with possible victims. Several vehicles had made a U-turn on Flamingo and headed west. The bicycle officer who made the call from the Maxim hotel began trailing the cars, but was too far behind to catch them. He could, however, see them turn left onto Las Vegas Boulevard.

    Chris Carroll was a sergeant on the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department’s bike patrol unit on the Strip. The 12 officers under his command rode in pairs, but Carroll was riding solo when he got the call that night, September 7, 1996. Traffic on the Strip is always slow-moving on a Saturday evening, but it was especially thick in the aftermath of Mike Tyson’s first-round technical knockout of Bruce Seldon at the MGM Grand a few hours earlier. And, now, somewhere in the midst of all those vehicles was a caravan of cars, one of them perhaps carrying the shooter.

    Carroll rode north to intercept them. “I’m thinking, ‘How am I going to stop these cars?’” Carroll says. “Usually on bikes, we used whistles and things like that, or we could call for a vehicle to help us. But as I’m riding toward them, I’m thinking, ‘These guys are on the run, there’s multiple cars and I’m heading nose-to-nose with them.’”

    *****

    The details surrounding Tupac Shakur’s death have been recounted dozens of times in the nearly 18 years since the night he was shot in Las Vegas. Newspaper and magazine articles, books, documentaries and websites have recapped, analyzed, scrutinized and commodified the rapper and actor’s unsolved murder, ranging from sober accounts to wild-eyed conspiracy theories. There are even those who still hold onto the belief that Shakur is not really dead, with reports over the years having him living in Cuba, New Zealand, Tasmania or rural Pennsylvania.

    When Shakur died six days after the shooting, at age 25, he was swiftly elevated from star to legend. In this trajectory, he joined other celebrities who died in their prime: James Dean, Marilyn Monroe, Jimi Hendrix, Kurt Cobain. The premise of what might have been captures the imagination; and the intensity of what was never quite lets go.

    John Singleton, who directed Shakur in the 1993 movie Poetic Justice, has co-written and will direct a feature film about the controversial hip-hop star, with production scheduled for later this year, and a Tupac-inspired musical, Holler If You Hear Me, is set to open on Broadway on June 19. But even with all the attention given to Shakur’s life and death, there remains one account of the night of the shooting that has not been heard before: from the police officer who was first on the scene.

    The songs of Tupac Shakur will be used as material for a new Broadway musical, scheduled to debut in the 2013-2014 season. Holler If Ya Hear Me will be co-produced by the late rapper's mother, Afeni Shakur.

    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.jimdo.com

    "Tupac was a prophet and I want everyone to see that," director Kenny Leon told Broadway.com. Although Shakur "is not a character" in the production, his music will be used to tell a "present-day" story, written by Todd Kreidler.

    Holler If Ya Hear Me reportedly centres on the story of two childhood friends, "struggling to reconcile the challenges and realities of their daily lives with their hopes, dreams and ambitions".
    It is not set in any of the places most closely associated with Shakur – New York, his birthplace; California, his longtime home; or Las Vegas, where he was murdered in 1996. Instead, Leon and Kreidler are telling the contemporary tale "of a midwestern industrial city" such as Detroit or Cleveland.
    Last week, the Hollywood Walk of Fame announced that Shakur, just 25 when he died, would receive a posthumous star on the landmark LA street, honouring his career. The rapper's albums have sold more than 75m copies.

    Rolling Stones / BY DANIEL KREPS November 30, 2015

    Eight months after director John Singleton parted ways with the Tupac Shakur biopic – and just a month after his replacement Carl Franklin quietly stepped away from the film – producers have recruited another director to helm the long-in-the-works movie.
    Music video vet Benny Boom will now take over the project that's working with an incredibly tight deadline: If the film doesn't go into production by year's end, 2Pac's big screen music rights will revert back to the rapper's mother Afeni Shakur, The Hollywood Reporter writes.

    Tupac Shakur Tupac Shakur Video Director Seeking Funds for Rapper Biopic »
    "I am blessed with the opportunity of a lifetime," Boom wrote on Instagram next to a photo of the rapper. "Telling the story of this revolutionary, artist, visionary, genius, soldier! I will make him proud and uphold the legacy." The filmmaker has previously directed videos by Nicki Minaj ("Beez in the Trap"), Busta Rhymes ("Touch It"), Lil Wayne, Keyshia Cole, 50 Cent and many more, as well as the 2009 film Next Day Air.


    Despite the success of Straight Outta Compton, a film that proved that a hip-hop biopic could thrive at the box office, production on the Shakur film has slowed due to creative differences and ongoing lawsuits.
    The film was originally scheduled to begin production in June with Singleton as director, but despite a finished script, the biopic was put "on hold." That was followed soon after by Singleton's loud exit.

    "The reason I am not making this picture is because the people involved aren't really respectful of the legacy of Tupac Amaru Shakur," Singleton wrote in April.
    "They have no true love for 'Pac so this movie will not be made with love, and that's why my ass isn't involved! If Tupac knew what was going on he'd ride on all these fools and take it to the streets...but I won't do that. I'll just make my own project." Singleton then promised to spearhead his own 2Pac film.

    Out of Time and House of Cards director Carl Franklin was then tasked with reining the Shakur biopic, but he left the project last month after a pair of producers filed a $10 million breach of contract lawsuit against the production company Morgan Creek.
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 11-17-2017 at 02:33 AM.

  5. #35
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    Reisig and Taylor Photography / Embodiment / Tupac Shakur

    Artists Chris Reisig and Leeza Taylor, whose creative and life partnership spans nearly 25 years, continue their exploration of the photographic medium with each new body of work.
    Their art practice reflects the life they have forged together, their children and the friends that are adsorbed into the family.

    Like many of REISIG AND TAYLOR' collaborative projects, the physical and emotional
    landscape of their own domestic space, becomes the point of departure for their artistic vision.

    In the series Naked, REISIG AND TAYLOR use lenticular photography to document a circle of family friends over the course of 10 years within their Los Angeles home.

    The subjects as well as the process engage the viewer. The portraits become a study of a youthful generation’s often irreverent, self-possessed comfort with their physical selves
    in front of a lens and their unraveling of the boundaries between privacy and publicity, intimacy and friendship.

    The images of REISIG AND TAYLOR succeed in reinterpreting the singular, handmade prints of photography’s earliest history while utilizing twenty first century technology.

    They bring their mastery of traditional darkroom techniques and computer generated image making to the labor intensive, digital application of lenticular printing first developed in the 1940s.

    REISIG AND TAYLOR marry tradition with the contemporary to create images with the uncanny ability to reveal secrets hidden in plain sight. The resulting prints challenge the cutting edge while retaining a classicism that is lush and seductive.



    http://www.bilder-upload.eu/upload/d...1510897253.jpg

    Beatles’ fans might debate whether new mash-up album “LOVE” is tantamount to sacrilege, but other genres have slightly fewer issues when it comes to taking a bit of post-career artistic license. Take US hip hop, for instance, where bullet wounds buy you status (see: Fiddy Cent, The Game) and milking dead cash cows has become something of an art form.


    Overdosing/being shot provided a welcome career boost for both ODB and Notorious BIG, but the undoubted daddy of beyond-the-grave rap remains Tupac Shakur. Since his brutal slaying more than ten years ago, Pac has been vastly more successful in death than he ever was in life – selling some 75 million records, having a performing arts college named after him, and the dubious honour of a number one collaboration with Elton John.


    “Pac’s Life” is the latest album (the 6th since his death) to grease the production line and cement his deification as the Lady Di of gangster rap. However, despite production makeovers by the likes of Swizz Beatz and guest appearances from Snoop, Ludacris and Chamillionaire, this collection of previously unreleased tracks only confirms that: (a) Tupac was a much better actor than he was a rapper; and, (b) the well of posthumous of material is beginning to dry up.

    With editorial control handed over to his mother, Afeni, the few passable moments are backward-looking, and beyond the resurrected G-Funk that staples together “Whatz Next” and “International” there is little here to enhance his reputation. And while mum’s gushing sleevenotes whittle on about Tupac’s spirit watching over the project and suggesting possible collaborators, you can’t help thinking that the man himself is probably ready to rest in peace.

    While there’s nothing bizarre as last year’s Bob Marley/Notorious BIG duet, “Pac’s Life” is - at best - an ill-befitting tribute, and can surely only be of interest to the most die hard of fans.
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 11-17-2017 at 02:06 AM.

  6. #36
    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
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    By now, Tupac Shakur is etched in our collective memory as simultaneously an imperfect saint and a perfect outlaw. In photos, you feel it. Simultaneously idealized and crucified in the public sphere, Tupac’s photographic legacy tells the story. The 20th anniversary of his death in Las Vegas just passed on September 7th. He was only 25-years-old. Los Angeles-bred photographer Mike Miller captured the iconic double middle finger shot just a year earlier as part of his album cover shoot for Tupac’s Thug Life album. He still has over 70 scans in the vault that no one has seen of Tupac.

    For Miller, the shoot embodied style, humor and urgency. One can imagine Tupac cracking up while giving the double middle finger to the camera. To a hip hop outsider, the pose can seem menacing but look closer and you start to understand there was a lot of humor in between the layers of raw aggression of the pose.

    “Style, the extension of the exquisitely personal into the public sphere, is something he had from the beginning,” wrote Zach Baron in GQ last year. “Other rappers imitated his easy, comfortable masculinity, his loose clothes, his confidence, his tattoos. He had the kind of aura others wanted to borrow. He’d wear things seemingly at random: vests, flannels, denim jackets, camo jackets, Henleys over other Henleys. Casual, almost incidental clothes to which he lent permanence.
    Shakur was defiance, one of those men who expressed it in both verse and style.”

    Born and raised in Los Angeles, Miller grew up in the punk, surf and skate scene, which eventually grew into a love of hip hop. He would go on to photograph West Coast hip hop in its infancy starting in the late 1980s when he snapped shots of his first rapper, Arabian Prince. Fashion campaigns for Stussy and others followed and soon, DJ Muggs (Cypress Hill) asked Miller to photograph the group while they were still shopping a demo. The rest as they say is history. Miller’s book West Coast Hip Hop: A History In Pictures features Eazy-E, Ice Cube, Snoop Dogg, Too Short, Cypress Hill and the list goes on.

    Mike Miller: Tupac was at the height of his career when we shot this. We first met up at Runyon Canyon where he had a condo. Tupac was very charming, present and highly intelligent. There was probably around 15 people in his crew. We all caravanned from location to location. He told me in private that he was happy to be able to make an album with all his homies that he grew up with.

    We first went to this hubcap place in South Central LA and you can see those in the background of some of the images, but then people started coming out of the woodwork so we had to leave. People recognized him everywhere and we did have gang situations where it was gnarly, but nothing serious that day. We spent 12 hours shooting around LA — East LA, Watts/Compton, downtown LA. For the shoot, he immediately turned on. He and his boys. Then we went to an abandoned train yard which is where we got the double middle finger shot. That was more like an outtake but when I looked at, I knew.

    I was happy there were so many good shots, but the image on this contact with the double flip off resonates with so many people that I’ve encountered. People have told me they had the double flip off poster on their walls when they were kids or up in dorm rooms. That image on the contact sheet really stood as a powerful image. That was shot with cross process film so there’s no color correction.
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 11-17-2017 at 02:15 AM.

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    Michael Miller

    Over the past 25 years Michael Miller has built an expansive portfolio. It includes over 500 major label album covers, iconic supermodels of the 90's and some of the biggest names in rap, rock and jazz.

    Michael was born and raised in Los Angeles and recalls the only radio station that came in clear where he lived during his teenage years was AM 1580 KDAY. As a Santa Monica High School student in the midst of the punk, surf and skate scene, he was listening to Run D.M.C., Doug E. Fresh and Slick Rick.

    Michael graduated from U.C.L.A. with a B.A. in film, theater and TV. After college, he took a trip with friends to explore Paris where he met then boxer turned top agent Rene Bosne, who in time became his roommate in Paris and introduced him to his first camera. Michael began landing jobs shooting models for John Casablanca and later relocated to Barcelona, Spain where he began to build an impressive portfolio shooting for major campaigns as Cacharel Paris.



    Influenced by the techniques of Peter Lindberg, Paulo Roversi and Javier Vallhonrat, Michael developed a method of cross processing film and using different chemical baths for black and white photographs. He was on to something that was still undiscovered in the U.S., sharing his method with fellow photographers such as Anton Corbijn.



    Miller returned to LA in 1988 and was immediately picked up by Herb Ritts agency Visages, shooting three advertisements in American Vogue in the first month. His recognition for technique and style in fashion photgraphy gained him attention in the music industry. By the end of 1988, he had photographed his first rapper Arabian Prince.

    Impressed with his major campaign for Stussy, producer DJ Muggs (7A3, Cypress Hill) asked Miller to photograph the demo for a new project titled Cypress Hill. He became a heavily sought-after photographer for the hip hop community.

    Michael continues shooting for advertisement campaigns, major publications, celebrities and musicians. His inaugural show, "West Coast Hip Hop, A History in Pictures" displayed 43 photos, the majority of which have never been shown to the public. He currently live with his wife and two daughters in LA.

  8. #38
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    Slipknot have wrapped up the touring cycle for 2014's standout effort, .5: The Gray Chapter, which yielded anthemic new cuts like "The Negative One" and "The Devil in I" among others. With frontman Corey Taylor's focus currently on Stone Sour's forthcoming album, Hydrograd, and subsequent tour, he's clued fans in as to how long they'll have to wait on Slipknot to release their next record and what musical direction he's looking to take on it.

    "Nothing's going on," Taylor told Metal Wani (audio below) when asked about Slipknot's current status. "We ain't doing s--t for two years. I'm doing Stone Sour. Clown's doing his movie thing. Everybody's kind of doing their own thing right now. So we're just kind of letting ourselves have some time away, which is cool. Sometimes you just have to do that — sometimes you have to go away and let people miss you. So that's what the plan is right now — just us kind of hanging out, letting everybody kind of catch their breath and then we'll figure it out from there."

    Regarding the next Slipknot album, Taylor expressed, "I know I want to write something violent, to be honest. I want to do something that feels uncomfortable. I want go somewhere where we haven't been in a long, long time. I don't know what that means, but I think when I hear it, I'll know what it is."

    With this promise, it seems to be a guarantee Taylor and co. won't draw any more "Nickelback lite" comparisons. Chad Kroeger, frontman for the Canadian rock powerhouse, threw the diss at Stone Sour in a recent interview, irked by comments made by Taylor about Nickelback in the past. He also went on to call Slipknot a "gimmick" because they wear masks onstage. Taylor later fired back and also told Metal Wani he felt Kroeger's move was simply to get attention, adding, "I think it's just him being really sad in his life and, honestly, I wish him well, but you went about the wrong way to try to get some attention, buddy."


    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.de
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 11-17-2017 at 06:03 AM.

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