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  1. #76
    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
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    1992 - Right On

    I like these interviews so far. They've been doing good.

    You've been doing a lot lately, right?

    Yeah, between Juice and this album it's been kind of hectic. I've been doing Digital Underground too.

    It's been good hectic?

    Yeah, but they all different though, so it's cool. It's just what I wanted. It's gonna be tough. Gonna be tough.

    Let's talk about how you got the role for Juice. How'd you come to Ernest Dickerson's attention?

    I walked in the office where they were auditioning that day. Truly coincidental, with a friend of mine, Money B from Digital Underground, and I saw everybody else reading and they thought I was Treach from Naughty By Nature. And they was like, "Yeah, yeah, Treach, we want you to read." I was like, "My name is Tupac. I'm from Oakland." They were like, "Whatever, just read."

    So they figured your look would work for what they were trying to do?

    Yeah, because when I walked in I had on all black, you know, the whole Raiders took, or whatever. That's not how I dress, but just that one day I had it on, and they just went with it.

    So you only had to audition that one time, and that was it?

    I auditioned like twenty times. They kept flying me back.

    Since the movie came out, do you think a lot of people have been surprised by your role and your portrayal of it? Because a lot of them probably didn't know that you studied a little bit of acting in school.

    Yeah, I'm getting a little more attention. People who met me before. Now they double meet me. You know what I'm saying. But, yeah, a lot of people are surprised. That surprises me, but it's cool.

    Did you surprise yourself, though, when you saw the film?

    I surprised myself by just getting the part. I didn't believe it. I still don't believe it. I still walk down the street, and if somebody notices me, I feel uncomfortable. And then I go, "Oh, yeah, the movie."

    A lot of people have gone to see it. And then they've got the posters all over the place.

    Everywhere.

    Do you think you'd like to do some more acting?

    I'd love to for the right price, and the right part.

    The same type of role, or does it matter?



    Different roles. Got to be different. I'll never do another role like that again, unless there's a sequel.

    When you got on the set of the film, was it similar to what you thought it would be?

    No. It was worse. I thought that, you know, it was better, I mean in some ways. And worse in other ways.

    Worse because of the long hours?

    Long hours.



    I came out there one day when they were shooting the club scene, the DJ thing, and I was there for like six hours.

    Yeah. That ain't cool. I mean, trust me, you're just coming out for a second, you saw it. I mean it was a lot for me to do. It was just hard work! It was so hard, all that running, all that jumping, all that climbing, all that jumping on buildings.

    But it worked out, though. Let me ask you this, the whole thing with the ad and the company deciding to take the gun out. How do you feel about that?

    I mean, it hurts me that they let a white dude, Christian Slater stand right next to me; and look in the paper, Cuffs, the movie, advertising for Cuffs-right next to Juice. He can have a gun, but the niggas can't. And I just don't like that. I don't like that in The Last Boy Scout, Bruce Willis gets a gun and Damon Wayans gets a football. I don't like that. I don't like that in Terminator 1 he gets a big, extra large, super-supreme gun, and he's an American hero. You know what I'm saying? The famous general from desert storm, big guns, big guns. Niggas can't have guns. That's the problem.

    When it was originally shot for the photo there was a gun in it, and then they air-brushed it out or whatever?

    Yeah.

    How did Ernest feel about it?

    He kind of foresaw it happening like this, but he didn't trip too much.

    They probably figured it was some other things that were happening in the past that they do it that way. 'Cause it's kind of tough, 'cause you can't always judge one incident by the other.

    Yeah, like they try to show it. So, if we would have rushed it and just turned out a movie we would have probably got some more attention. But since we came back after the other Black movies, which is as a whole, it's just wrong, you know what I'm saying?

    What's like the oddest thing that's happened since you've done the movie as far as fans?

    I got to be with this 31-year-old married woman. That was just too much for me! Too much. Everything else I was willing to deal with, and could deal with. But I didn't know that this rap business and all of this and this movie stuff would reach that age group. That was just weird.

    So, she was ready to leave her family, or this was just a little side thing?

    No she's not ready to leave of nothing. She was just sowing her oats, too, I guess.

    But you're 21?

    20

    You come across a little older than that though. So that probably part of it too.

    Okay. I loved it, regardless, I loved it.

    I met this young man that played Q and he seemed a little older than he is too. Just from talking to him. So it's good to find young black men that are mature.

    We're sure trying.

    Let's go back a little but when you were in Baltimore and you decided to come back to Cali? What made you decide?

    No money. My mom was into drugs. I didn't have any loot. I was poor. My mother had just had a miscarriage. I had to get up out of there to survive.

    Did you know anybody out there?

    Cali. I knew one person. My Godfather's wife. My Godfather's Geronimo Pratt. He's in jail, but his wife was out. So I just went out and stayed with her for a little bit until I was released from her house and had to find a new spot.

    So that was like a rough time?

    Umm Hmm.

    And then hooking up with Digital Underground?

    Was like my salvation. Shock-G, they drove the shuttle. I was in the city. A train came off the ground, said all aboard. I got on the train and this is where I ended up. And I'm still riding the train.

    You're doing your solo thing, but are you still a part of the group?

    Still, very much part of that train. I just get my own car now.

    So you may go back and record with them too?

    I did. l'm still very much a part of the group.

    Let's talk about the album. Tell me about the direction of it?

    I wanted it to be true. I wanted it to be something for young black males to listen to, not as a fad thing; not just like an America's most wanted type thing. I didn't want to be on the bandwagon, but I didn't say nothing. You know what I'm saying? I felt like I had things to say to my fellow niggas and I didn't say it. And I had to say it, so this is what I did; a young black male, tapped, soldier story. I wanted them to know I'm one of them right away, and I understand their problems right away.

    Tell us a little bit of the story behind it.

    "Trapped" is the true story just talking about how young black males get caught up in the stereotype where we can never escape this vicious 360 degree deadly circle. It doesn't give any answers. It just tells us that we are trapped. It's just like a little anthem.

    You wrote all the lyrics?

    With "Trapped," somebody wrote along with me. Matt's the only one I ever wrote with somebody else. But besides that I write everything else.

    Do you know what the next thing's gonna be?

    "Brenda's Got A Baby."

    What other projects have you got coming up?

    I'm working with this female. A Sister Named Mister. She's gonna be very strong for women. She's gonna be speaking up for women, but she's not gonna be putting her body in the camera to do it. None of that. She's not gonna use her body at all to sell.

    She's gonna be political or somewhere in between?

    She's not gonna be little Sister Souljah either. She's gonna be a real black woman with a mic. She's gonna have the power of a black woman without me raping her. I'm not gonna put her body on pictures or anything like that. She's gonna get the respect of a man. She's gonna get the power of a woman. She's eighteen. Her first song is "Don't Forget Where You Came From," 'cause you know how niggas 'l came from the Bronx,' 'I came from Brooklyn,' you came from a uterus. You know and that's what we forgetting with all this bullshit.

    Is she signed to the same label that you are?

    No. I've come up with some kids: Gold, who are speaking up to the future of the young black male, speaking up about what we need to do and what we've already done.

    So you've got your own production company?

    That's the Underground Railroad.

    So, you're busy on all fronts?

    I'm sure trying.

    Is there one that you like more than the other?

    Well, right now I love them all the same, 'cause we're all family, but right now I'm very interested in Mister, because that's very important for us as men to have our women next to us. And the other one, my favorite is Underground Railroad, the group, that's my brother and this guy, Mouse. They're about to come out strong. They've got the best music.

    I'm sure you've done a lot of traveling. Do you have a favorite city to hang out in or perform in?

    Besides my hometown, Oakland, I love New York; because that's my other hometown.

    We have a lot of young readers. Do you have a message for young men who are either trying to get in the business, or just a message to them in general?

    We don't need a thousand rappers. We need 500 rappers and 500 brain people, like scientists and mathematicians. Everybody can't perform. That's one thing.

    Number two, I'm not gonna "just say no," and all of that. I want you to experience life as it is. Totally live to the fullest, but learn from your mistakes and learn from the mistakes of other people. You know what I'm saying? Make your own decisions. 'Cause just the simple fact of somebody telling you "just say no" is somebody making the decision for you. You make your own decisions. Live your own life. If you want to be a crack head, and if you want to give up your whole life, it's on you. If you want to be great, and you want to accomplish things, it's on you.

    Tell me about you. How would you describe yourself?

    I'm a Gemini. I have the two sides, I have the very loud, hardcore, brittle side and I have the poet, the introverted, calm, quiet type. So, I think that Tupac is a soldier, S O U L J A. I fight from my soul, from my heart. I'm a fighter to the end. I've had to be.

    You made the best of your situation?

    I sure tried
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 03-06-2017 at 06:04 PM.

  2. #77
    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
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    http://img5.fotos-hochladen.net/uplo...zn7ufsvewb.jpg /

    Published 1999 / Writer Unknown / Story behind NY 94 / Tupac Shakur


    “Listen while I take you back (NIGGA SAY HIS NAME!) and lace this rap A real live tale about a snitch named Haitian Jack Knew he was working for the feds, same crime, different trials Nigga, picture what he said, and did I mention Promised a payback, Jimmy Henchman, in due time I know you bitch niggas is listenin, The World Is Mine…”

    Against All Odds’ Tupac Shakur


    Haitian Jack was the most feared man in the music industry. Jack, AKA Jacques Agnant, was born in Haiti to a family of privileged politicians. They were highly educated professionals. His older siblings attended medical schools and universities in the United States. His family attended parties at ‘Baby Doc’ Duvalier’s mansion. After the coup, his family fled to Brooklyn, New York with limited funds and connections. Jack, speaking only French, was placed in a tough, local public school and forced to fight on a daily basis. He became one of the toughest street thugs in the history of Brooklyn, New York.

    Jack began committing burglaries during his teen years. He specialized in drug dealers’ apartments. Jack formed a gang known as the Black Mafia. He recruited the toughest street robbers in the borough. His posse consisted of thugs such as, Tut, Nubs, Stretch, and other sociopaths, all looking to cash in on the drug economy. His crew was so feared; they could walk down the lines of New York’s hottest night clubs and take every drug dealer’s Rolex and wallet without as much as a peep. Jack began befriending such people as Mike Tyson and some local professional ball players. He used his charm to get into their pockets and when that failed, he produced a firearm. He invented the ‘friendly’ extortion game in the Black community. He is said to be the only man Mike Tyson ever feared.

    In the early 1990′s, rap music could be heard on every comer of Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn -a neighborhood so bad, the local residents coined the saying ‘Bed-Stuy Do or Die.’ Jack went out of his way to get to know Biggie Smalls, a young, local rap artist with a lot of promise. Tupac Shakur heard about Biggie, travelled to Brooklyn, and the two began to perform together. Tupac put Biggie on the map. Biggie introduced Jack to Tupac, a day that would forever seal Mr. Shakur’s fate. Jack felt that rap artists should pay homage to him; after all, he lived the life they exploited through song.

    Jack and Tupac hit it off. Tupac loved Jack’s street creds and the feeling of power this mobster exuded through his swagger and earned reputation. He wanted what Jack had almost more than fame and fortune. Jack provided protection, women, and marijuana. Tupac picked up the tab at all the hot clubs. Jack was unofficially managing Tupac; the two were inseparable. The duo found themselves partying at clubs such as Nell’s with the likes of Madonna and other hot stars. Jack felt that his ride with Tupac would never end.

    Jack whispered in a girl’s ear one evening at Nell’s. She smiled and walked over to Tupac. The two danced and later returned to his hotel suite. The following day she returned. Tupac took her to his room; they began having sex when Jack’s crew entered the room. The young woman became the victim of date rape. She left in tears. The police later arrived and arrested Jack and Tupac. The two hired the best attorneys and planned strategy for their defense. Jack’s attorney, Paul Brenner, decided to sever Jack’s case from Shakur’s. He got Jack a six-month plea deal. The Manhattan D.A.’s office wasn’t so kind to Tupac. He went to trial, was found guilty, and was due back in court for sentencing at a later date.

    Tupac felt betrayed by Jack. He thought they should have gone to trial together. He knew Jack could handle prison; he wasn’t so sure about himself. Tupac stopped taking calls from Jack and his crew. Tupac began clubbing again. He returned to Nell’s and made a fatal mistake: he commented on Jack’s criminal dealings to New York Post reporter AJ. Benza. After making Page Six the following day, Jack plotted his revenge.

    Puff Daddy feared Jack so much, he once handed him ten grand and his Rolex. Jacks’ crew coaxed Shakur to Quad Studios in Manhattan to lay down some tracks with Puff Daddy’s Bad Boy roster. Tupac entered the lobby with one of Jack’s crew, a kid named Stretch Walker. Jack’s boys confronted Tupac in the lobby. He resisted a beat down and was shot several times, suffering gunshot wounds to the head and groin. Stretch was shot in the melee as well. Shakur felt that Puffy and Biggie had set him up. He was sentenced to prison a few weeks later. Jack’s muscle within the prison system relentlessly sought Shakur out. One day, Tupac received a visit from Los Angeles gangster and owner of Death Row Records, Marion ‘Suge’ Knight. Suge convinced Tupac to sign with his label. The east coast-west coast wars were set in motion.

    Years of violence between Bad Boy and Death Row left Biggie Smalls and Tupac Shakur dead. Knight’s organization had been crippled by numerous police investigations. Jack reinvented himself through The Fugees; Wyclef Jeans’ pockets were deep and Jack had both hands in them. Wyclef didn’t mind so much. Jack was a fellow Haitian and he kept all the extortion crews far away. After touring with the Fugees, Jack fell in love with Beverly Hills. He started his own management company and attached himself to artists’ publishing rights by way of fear and the gun. He broke ranks and had amassed a small fortune. Jack wasn’t happy though; he wanted more.

    In 1997, Tupac was killed in Vegas and Biggie was later murdered in Los Angeles. Haitian Jack broke ranks from his crew. Nubs was murdered, and Tut went away on a Rico. The rest were bottom feeders unable to drive through the Hills without attracting attention. Jack was solo. Haitian knew he could have problems with L.A. gang members, so he established a geographical zone to stay in. He never ventured farther north of Sunset, south of Pico, east of Fairfax, orwestofthe405. It kept him away from gang bangers and the police. Jack was getting rich, but he was also getting bored.

    Detective Bill Courtney was an undercover detective in the NYPD’s elite Intelligence Division. He was given his own unit and tasked with an impossible mission: taking the mob out of the music industry. Bill knew Jack’s rep from back in his Robbery Squad days. He had heard about Jack again while assigned to the DEA. Jack had robbed half the drug dealers in New York. Wire taps were abuzz about being done by the ‘Haitian One’, but no one knew where he had gone. His name was legendary, as the killer of Tupac. A little homework revealed that Jack had never earned his citizenship. As a predicate felon, Jack was deportable. Bill felt that if he found Jack, he could make him an offer he couldn’t refuse: join Team America or go back to Haiti.


    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.jimdo.com
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 03-11-2017 at 02:19 PM.

  3. #78
    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
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    In September 1996, Tupac Shakur hobbled out of the University Medical Center of Southern Nevada. Despite dire predictions that 2Pac wouldn’t survive four bullets, the indestructible rapper came home to L.A. — paranoid and wounded but determined to break the destructive loop of violence.

    After Suge Knight returned to prison, 2Pac distanced himself from the chaos of Death Row Records. Shortly before the shooting, Shakur had formed production company Euphanasia, which gradually absorbed more of his time and energy.


    Revenues from executive producing American History X helped him buy himself out of his record deal. A beloved comedic turn opposite Jackie Chan in Rush Hour partially erased past controversies. Hollywood studio heads finally saw 2Pac as a bankable star — a sinister version of Will Smith. A Rolling Stone cover story claimed he had “finally matured,” thanks to wife Kidada Jones and her father, mogul Quincy Jones, who’d become a paternal mentor.

    Right as the South became a force, 2Pac signed with No Limit Records, shocking those who interpreted his California love as absolutism. In reality, he’d always loved all forms of rap, once telling The Source that the Geto Boys’ Grip It! On That Other Level was his favorite. Besides, Master P founded his label in the Bay Area, where he’d once attempted to sign 2Pac during his Digital Underground days. Both of his No Limit albums went No. 1; 2Pac’s duets with Mystikal were spectacular.

    Becoming a father and husband spurred 2Pac to reconcile with his enemies (save for Chino XL). His cameo on “It’s Mine,” alongside Mobb Deep and Nas, became a definitive Tunnel banger of the era, earning back East Coast respect for the rapper who once called himself MC New York.

    2Pac and Biggie brokered peace after the murder of Big L reminded them how close their own rivalry had come to a bloody end. Many critics hailed their joint appearance at the 2000 Grammy Awards as a historic juncture in rap’s growing mainstream dominance. It also was remembered for 2Pac’s decision to diss Sisqo, apropos of nothing.

    During Bush’s first term, 2Pac mostly focused on his film career, directing his first feature, a drama loosely based on the plot of “Brenda’s Got a Baby.” There was a turn on Broadway, where he starred as Walter Younger in A Raisin in the Sun, a poetic triumph for the former art student whose acting debut came at age 13, when he played Travis Younger on the Apollo stage in Harlem.

    2Pac’s proudest moment may have come during his Best Supporting Actor acceptance speech at the 2005 Academy Awards for his role opposite Tom Cruise in Collateral. Indicting the Bush administration’s corruption, war crimes and inequitable treatment of minorities, 2Pac once again became the most divisive figure in America.

    Racist epithets and calls for boycotts followed, but ultimately 2Pac’s critique was remembered for its eloquence and courage. If anyone wondered whether he’d gone Hollywood, the son of a Black Panther leader reasserted himself as one of the most important civil rights figures of his generation. His efforts to diminish inner-city poverty and gang violence earned him an invitation to address the United Nations. Even the ambassador from Slovenia learned what T.H.U.G. L.I.F.E. stood for.

    A generation of 2000s stars (Lil Wayne, Boosie, 50 Cent, Eminem) worshipped him as a god. Wayne even heeded his advice not to sign a rapper from a Canadian teen soap opera. Instead, Aubrey “Drake” Graham went on to become a producer for Guy Fieri.

    2Pac crushed his guest appearances on 30 Rock and Parks and Rec, and emerged as a leader of the Black Lives Matter movement. Twenty years after his attempted murder, he remains one of the most revered and irreplaceable figures in American life.

    To think what we could have lost.
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 04-01-2017 at 01:25 PM.

  4. #79
    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
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    Earlier this month, the rumor of Tupac Shakur faking his own death was again reawakened when the official Twitter account for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) tweeted the following message: “No, we don’t know where Tupac is. #twitterversary.”

    And during a recent interview with Vlad TV, Outlawz rapper E.D.I. Mean was questioned about the CIA’s tweet and the possibility of Tupac faking his own death. Prior to revealing that he wouldn’t be surprised by anything involving Tupac, E.D.I. Mean recalled the late rapper telling him that “Mystery will keep you alive forever.”

    He also says he unknowingly spawned a whole new set of rumors about Tupac being alive when he placed his cousin, who looked similar to Pac, in one of his music videos.

    “Pac was a smart dude, man,” E.D.I. Mean said. “You know, Pac he would say shit to us like ‘Yo, remember mystery sells. Mystery will keep you alive forever’…I put a video out called ‘Thug Life 2013’ last year. And in the video I got my cousin with me. Who’s kinda tall, dark-skinned, got a bald head. And in one of the scenes he just walks past. A whole fuckin movement started about that being Pac in that video. That’s all they talked about was ‘Yo, that was Pac in that video.’”

    E.D.I. Mean once again addressed rumors that the Outlawz smoked Tupac’s ashes following his death. He says the story did in fact start from a rumor and says he would never “purposefully do anything” to get shine from Tupac.

    “It’s true. That is true,” he said when asked about Tupac’s family denying that the Outlawz had any access to the rapper’s ashes. “That was not our son. You know what I mean? So, we don’t have that. And we shouldn’t have that…It started from a rumor. After that story came out we was told those weren’t Pac’s ashes. Everything we did came from an honest place. It didn’t come from trying to get no light from it. Cause that’s not how we rock. I would never purposefully do anything to get some light from my man. Whatever light I got is light that he was sharing with me, generously. He had a choice to do it…And when he got on records and said, ‘Last wishes, nigga, smoke my ashes’ whether people want to admit it or not or believe it or not, a lot of times when we was making music together we would talk to each other in our verses.”

    As a good friend of Tupac’s, E.D.I. Mean was asked what he thought of Jermaine Dupri comparing Chris Brown to Tupac, during a previous installment of his interview with Vlad TV. He revealed that he’s not concerned with the comparison and hopes Brown does well in his career.

    “People expect us to take it personal,” he said. “Like ‘Yo, how y’all feel about that? Man, y’all should do another ‘Hit Em Up’ for Jermaine Dupri.’ Like what the fuck I look like dissing Jermaine Dupri? And I enjoy Chris’ music. You know what I mean? I wish him well in what he do. And I hope he don’t got to go through half the shit Pac went through.”
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 04-09-2017 at 02:41 PM.

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    The legend of Tupac "2Pac" Shakur is alive and well 20 years after the rap icon's tragic death. With a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame nomination this week, an upcoming biopic and rumors of unreleased tracks possibly being released, 2017 is poised to possibly be the biggest year for the slain rapper as his life has maintained an impressive level of relevancy.

    Shakur's nomination Tuesday for the Hall of Fame's Class of 2017 put him in elite company, joining an accomplished group of nominees that includes Pearl Jam, Depeche Mode and Electric Light Orchestra. It's also historically important, as he would become only the sixth hip-hop addition — and only solo rapper — to be inducted after Grandmaster Flash, Run-DMC, the Beastie Boys, Public Enemy and N.W.A. 2017 is the first year Shakur was eligible, as artists can be nominated at least 25 years after their first record's release.

    Shakur, who also gained critical acclaim for his acting, has already been represented on the small screen this year. The Lifetime made-for-TV movie “Surviving Compton: Dre, Suge & Michel’le," while not focusing on Shakur, provided a glimpse into his personal life as a rapper signed to the notorious Death Row Records under Suge Knight, who is in jail waiting for his murder trial to begin.

    Adding to the anticipation of the biopic's release are the rampant rumors of unreleased 2Pac tracks kept under lock and key since his death. In a 1997 televised tribute one year after his death, MTV claimed 170 unreleased tracks and poems exist in Pac's archive. With rumors of unreleased music flying, Tupac's memorabilia has hit the market in the form of several personal remnants. A bible from his time in prison and a bullet-dented diamond pendant are both up for auction on the site Moments in Time.



    Rap and hip-hop artists have been notoriously not considered for inclusion in the Rock Hall of Fame. Last year, KISS bassist Gene Simmons protested N.W.A’s inclusion on the ballot last year, telling Radio.com that if "you don’t play guitar and you don’t write your own songs, you don’t belong there."



    Yet for many, Shakur transcended hip-hop. His cultural icon status is cemented in his rags-to-riches success, poetic lyrics and outspoken criticism of social and political events. He is also one of the most successful artists of all time, selling more than 75 million albums worldwide. Current rappers from Kendrick Lamar to 50 Cent to Drake have cited Shakur as a major influence.

    “His attitude, energy, and passion is inspiring", said J. Cole. “He accomplished more in 25 years than most other people do in a lifetime.”
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 05-13-2017 at 10:41 AM.

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    Tupac Shakur may be gone, but his conscious messages still linger. This time the message is not in his music and instead in one of his writings from prison. A letter penned by the late great rapper was recently uncovered, and is is not singing his traditional “thug life” tune. The letter entitled, “Is Thug Life Dead?” is a five-page message penned by the rapper to Death Row Records employee, Nina Bhadreshwar following his 1995 conviction for sexual abuse. It details his desire to swap a life of gang violence, drugs, and pain, for a more fulfilling one. The letter is currently on sale for $225,000.

    ‘Pac’s infamous “thug life” mentality, which the rapper had tatted on his stomach, was a large part of his career. Shakur produced many singles and albums dedicated to the way of life, including his “Thug 4 Life” and the album, Thug Life: Volume I. In the letter, Shakur speaks about the motto that was soon adopted by the West Coast, saying “I did not begin thug life, I personified it.” The letter lays out a plan for him and other African-American men to exit the lifestyle and cycle of violence and drugs.

    “U must play the game, not let the game play u. A regular Playa plays women, a Boss Playa plays life. A Boss Playa is a thinker, a leader, a builder, a moneymaker, a souljah, a teacher and most of all, a Man!” he wrote.



    He also advises the “homies” about facing demons. “I want all my homies 2 realize there is another level it takes heart and courage to stand alone face the demons and make change!” The rapper opened up about his own battle with depression, anger, and drugs. He mentioned the use of drugs as a coping mechanism for the pain and anger. Nearing the end of his life, Tupac was often captured in the media as aggressive and emotional. At the time he was dealing with attempted murder charges and a highly-publicized beef with Notorious B.I.G. His interview with Hot 97’s Angie Martinez was one of his most aggressive interviews.

    Unfortunately, Tupac wasn’t able to see the new lifestyle through. The West Coast rapper succumbed to gunshot wounds on September 13, 1996, six days after being attacked in Las Vegas. But for anyone who may want to take some of his advice and apply it to their own life, the lost letter is on sale on memorabilia site, Moments in Time. Read Tupac’s letter below:

    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.jimdo.com
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 05-13-2017 at 05:28 AM.

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    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
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    The following is excerpted from Original Gangstas: The Untold Story of Dr. Dre, Eazy-E, Ice Cube, Tupac Shakur, and the Birth of West Coast Rap by Ben Westhoff, forthcoming from Hachette Book Group on September 13, the 20th anniversary of Tupac Shakur's death.
    Tupac and Biggie first encountered each other in 1993, in Los Angeles. There on business, the Brooklyn-bred rapper Biggie asked a local drug dealer to introduce him to Tupac, who invited Biggie and his party to his house. There, he shared with them a "big freezer bag of the greenest vegetables I'd ever seen," said an intern for Biggie's label, named Dan Smalls, who was part of the group.

    Tupac got them high and pulled out a "green army bag" filled with handguns and machine guns. "So now, here we are, in this backyard running around with guns, just playing," continued Dan Smalls in The Fader. "Luckily they were all unloaded. While we were running around, 'Pac walks into the kitchen and starts cooking for us. He's in the kitchen cooking some steaks. We were drinking and smoking and all of a sudden 'Pac was like, 'Yo, come get it.' And we go into the kitchen and he had steaks, and French fries, and bread, and Kool‑Aid and we just sittin' there eating and drinking and laughing. And you know, that's truly where Big and 'Pac's friendship started."

    "We all thought he was a dope rapper," Tupac's longtime friend EDI Mean, a member of Tupac's affiliated group the Outlawz, told me. Tupac gifted Biggie a bottle of Hennessy. Biggie slept on Tupac's couch whenever he came back to California, and when Tupac was in New York, he came by Biggie's neighborhood, picking him up in a white limousine and throwing dice with the locals. The pair freestyled back-to-back at a concert called Budweiser Superfest at Madison Square Garden in 1993, with Biggie wowing the crowds with lines like, "Oh my God I'm dropping shit like a pigeon / I hope you're listenin' / Smackin' babies at their christenin'."

    Despite the Garden cameo, Biggie still wasn't much known outside of Brooklyn. Tupac, by then a platinum‑selling rapper and movie star, acted as a mentor. Biggie and other young rappers assembled in recording studios or hotel rooms to hear Tupac lecture about how to make it in the game. "'Pac could get up and get to teaching," said EDI Mean. "Everyone was transfixed on this dynamic individual, and soaking up all the information we could soak up." But Tupac devoted special attention to Biggie, grooming him and letting him perform at his concerts. Biggie even told him he'd like to be a part of another of his affiliated groups, called Thug Life. "I trained the nigga, he used to be under me like my lieutenant," Tupac said.

    Tupac claimed to have directly influenced Biggie's style. "I used to tell the nigga, 'If you want to make your money, you have to rap for the bitches. Do not rap for the niggas,' " he said. "The bitches will buy your records, and the niggas want what the bitches want." As proof that Biggie had heeded his advice, Tupac cited the difference between his early track, the aggressive "Party and Bullshit," and softer songs from his debut Ready to Die like "Big Poppa," which appealed more to the ladies: "Soon as he buy that wine, I just creep up from behind / And ask what your interests are, who you be with?"

    But before Ready to Die came out, Biggie worried he could miss his shot, considering that the new label he was signed to, Bad Boy—owned by his manager Sean "Puffy" Combs—hadn't taken off yet. Things weren't happening for him quickly enough, he complained. He asked Tupac to take over as his manager, in hopes Tupac could advance his music and film career as rapidly as he'd done his own. "Biggie looked like he was wearing the same pair of Timberlands for a year, [while] 'Pac was staying at the Waldorf‑Astoria and buying Rolexes and dating Madonna," EDI Mean said.

    But Tupac declined the offer. "Nah, stay with Puff," he told Biggie. "He will make you a star."



    In New York to shoot the 1994 film Above the Rim, Tupac became enmeshed with a group of notorious Queens toughs. He was modeling his character Birdie—a gangster involved in youth basketball programs—on a Haiti-born high roller called Jacques "Haitian Jack" Agnant.

    Tupac had noticed Haitian Jack at a Manhattan club, surrounded by women and champagne, and asked for an introduction. They also spent time at a Queens bar, where Jack would bring through celebrities including Madonna, Shabba Ranks, and Jamaican musician Buju Banton. (Tupac briefly dated Madonna, after Rosie Perez introduced them at the 1993 Soul Train Awards in LA.) Biggie, who ran in the same circles as Haitian Jack and his associates, warned Tupac to keep his distance from him, to no avail. Tupac liked Jack's swagger. He introduced the rapper to high-end jewelry and Versace duds, as well as the local gangstas who called the shots. "[H]e loved the respect and recognition I got in New York, and I think he wanted that same respect," Haitian Jack said.

    The two were partying at a Manhattan club called Nell's in November 1993, where Tupac met a 19-year-old woman named Ayanna Jackson. They got close on the dance floor and went back to his suite at the Le Parker Meridien Hotel. Four days later ,she met up with him at the hotel again, only to encounter not just Tupac, but Haitian Jack, Tupac's road manager Charles "Man Man" Fuller, and another man who was not identified. There, she alleged, the group gang-raped her and forced her to perform oral sex. Tupac claimed he left the bedroom when the other men entered and fell asleep. She called the police, and Tupac, Haitian Jack, and Fuller were arrested. The police also found guns, which Tupac later claimed belonged to Biggie.

    The prosecution alleged Tupac, charged with sexual abuse, sodomy, and illegal weapons possession, had offered up Jackson "as a reward for his boys." Tupac denied this, but after the trial told Vibe he blamed himself for "doing nothing" to protect Jackson from the other men. Before the trial began, Tupac's and Fuller's cases were severed from Haitian Jack's; in a deal that Tupac and his lawyer deemed too good to be true, Jack pleaded guilty to two misdemeanors and avoided jail time. Believing Haitian Jack was a snitch, Tupac told a New York Daily News reporter that Jack had set him up. (Ayanna Jackson and Haitian Jack have denied this.)

    Calling out a reputed gangster in the press is not sensible. But, ironically, after spending so much time with Jack and his ilk, Tupac had begun to feel invincible. He went wherever he wanted, wearing flashy jewelry worth thousands of dollars. Secure in his street credentials, he was convinced that nobody would mess with him.



    http://img5.fotos-hochladen.net/uplo...tdaugwpbv8.jpg

    Supporting his extended family and paying lawyers for his interminable string of court cases, Tupac's bank accounts withered. In late 1994, he agreed to record a guest verse for a rapper named Little Shawn, who was close with Puffy and Biggie. The invitation came from Little Shawn's manager, Jimmy "Henchman" Rosemond, whom Tupac had met through Haitian Jack, and Tupac was to be paid $7,000.

    On November 30, 1994, Tupac arrived stoned to Quad Recording Studios in Times Square. He came with three associates, none of whom were bodyguards, and encountered three other men he didn't know, wearing army fatigues. This was fashion from Brooklyn—Biggie's home—so Tupac assumed they were with him. He felt better about the situation when Biggie's affiliated rapper Lil' Cease yelled down to him that Biggie was upstairs recording. Puffy was there, too.

    But before Tupac's crew could get on the elevator, the men in army fatigues drew 9mm guns and ordered them to the floor. Instead, Tupac reached for his own gun. He was shot, beaten, and robbed of his jewelry. He played dead, and the assailants left, at which time he staggered into the elevator and rode it upstairs. When the doors opened, he saw a group including Puffy, Biggie, and Henchman. Tupac said the crew looked surprised and guilty, but Puffy claimed they showed him "nothing but love and concern."

    Tupac believed the incident was more than a random heist. "It was like they were mad at me," he said. He claimed to have taken five bullets, including shots to the head and through his scrotum, though forensic evidence suggested he likely shot himself.

    Bill Courtney, a retired NYPD cop who also worked hip-hop cases, believed the stick-up was a response to Tupac's Daily News comments against Haitian Jack. "A message was being sent to him not to name-drop," he said.

    "Nobody came to rob you," Henchman told Vibe in 2005. "They came to discipline you."

    Puffy and Biggie denied their involvement in the crime, or any prior knowledge of it. Haitian Jack also claimed he wasn't involved, and following a separate conviction was deported to Haiti in 2007.

    On December 1, 1994, Tupac arrived to a New York City courtroom wearing bandages and confined to a wheelchair, and was pronounced guilty of sexual abuse in the Ayanna Jackson case, though acquitted on the sodomy and weapons charges. Sentenced to a minimum of a year and a half in prison, pending appeal, his bail was set at $3 million.

    Unable to raise bail, Tupac served most of his time at Clinton Correctional Facility, a maximum-security prison in upstate New York. Me Against the World, Tupac's third album, was released soon after his prison sentence began. Tupac considered making it his swan song; he was tired of all of the music industry drama. But his passion reignited after a disturbing rumor began to sink in, one that came from people he trusted: that Biggie knew in advance about the Quad studios shooting.

    "He owed me more than to turn his head and act like he didn't know niggas was about to blow my fucking head off," he said later. And even if Biggie hadn't set him up, he should at least have been able to find out who did it. "You don't know who shot me in your hometown, these niggas from your neighborhood?"

    The way Tupac saw it, his own friend had betrayed him—a friend whom Tupac had helped to acquire fame and fortune.


    While in prison, Tupac asked his wife Keisha Morris (whom he had married while incarcerated) to relay a message to Suge Knight, the head of the volatile label Death Row Records: He was broke and needed help. On top of the lawyers' fees and everything else, his mother was losing her house.

    "Suge sent $15,000 and put it on his books," Reggie Wright Jr., Death Row's head of security, told me. Tupac was jubilant and sent Suge another message, that he'd like to see him.

    Few places in the US were farther away from Los Angeles than Dannemora, New York, where Tupac was incarcerated, but Suge began coming out. Further, Death Row offered him something no one else seemed to be able to deliver: release. Death Row's lawyer David Kenner pledged to help Tupac with his case and began working to spring him on an appeal bond.

    Suge didn't just try to recruit Tupac to his label, he offered him a place in his family, the most powerful and out-of-control family in hip-hop.



    http://img5.fotos-hochladen.net/uplo...qt1sw5kxu0.jpg
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 05-24-2017 at 12:32 AM.

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    Born 2 Revolutionise Executive Director Krizzle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LesaneParishCrookz View Post
    The following is excerpted from Original Gangstas: The Untold Story of Dr. Dre, Eazy-E, Ice Cube, Tupac Shakur, and the Birth of West Coast Rap by Ben Westhoff, forthcoming from Hachette Book Group on September 13, the 20th anniversary of Tupac Shakur's death.
    Tupac and Biggie first encountered each other in 1993, in Los Angeles. There on business, the Brooklyn-bred rapper Biggie asked a local drug dealer to introduce him to Tupac, who invited Biggie and his party to his house. There, he shared with them a "big freezer bag of the greenest vegetables I'd ever seen," said an intern for Biggie's label, named Dan Smalls, who was part of the group.

    Tupac got them high and pulled out a "green army bag" filled with handguns and machine guns. "So now, here we are, in this backyard running around with guns, just playing," continued Dan Smalls in The Fader. "Luckily they were all unloaded. While we were running around, 'Pac walks into the kitchen and starts cooking for us. He's in the kitchen cooking some steaks. We were drinking and smoking and all of a sudden 'Pac was like, 'Yo, come get it.' And we go into the kitchen and he had steaks, and French fries, and bread, and Kool‑Aid and we just sittin' there eating and drinking and laughing. And you know, that's truly where Big and 'Pac's friendship started."

    "We all thought he was a dope rapper," Tupac's longtime friend EDI Mean, a member of Tupac's affiliated group the Outlawz, told me. Tupac gifted Biggie a bottle of Hennessy. Biggie slept on Tupac's couch whenever he came back to California, and when Tupac was in New York, he came by Biggie's neighborhood, picking him up in a white limousine and throwing dice with the locals. The pair freestyled back-to-back at a concert called Budweiser Superfest at Madison Square Garden in 1993, with Biggie wowing the crowds with lines like, "Oh my God I'm dropping shit like a pigeon / I hope you're listenin' / Smackin' babies at their christenin'."

    Despite the Garden cameo, Biggie still wasn't much known outside of Brooklyn. Tupac, by then a platinum‑selling rapper and movie star, acted as a mentor. Biggie and other young rappers assembled in recording studios or hotel rooms to hear Tupac lecture about how to make it in the game. "'Pac could get up and get to teaching," said EDI Mean. "Everyone was transfixed on this dynamic individual, and soaking up all the information we could soak up." But Tupac devoted special attention to Biggie, grooming him and letting him perform at his concerts. Biggie even told him he'd like to be a part of another of his affiliated groups, called Thug Life. "I trained the nigga, he used to be under me like my lieutenant," Tupac said.

    Tupac claimed to have directly influenced Biggie's style. "I used to tell the nigga, 'If you want to make your money, you have to rap for the bitches. Do not rap for the niggas,' " he said. "The bitches will buy your records, and the niggas want what the bitches want." As proof that Biggie had heeded his advice, Tupac cited the difference between his early track, the aggressive "Party and Bullshit," and softer songs from his debut Ready to Die like "Big Poppa," which appealed more to the ladies: "Soon as he buy that wine, I just creep up from behind / And ask what your interests are, who you be with?"

    But before Ready to Die came out, Biggie worried he could miss his shot, considering that the new label he was signed to, Bad Boy—owned by his manager Sean "Puffy" Combs—hadn't taken off yet. Things weren't happening for him quickly enough, he complained. He asked Tupac to take over as his manager, in hopes Tupac could advance his music and film career as rapidly as he'd done his own. "Biggie looked like he was wearing the same pair of Timberlands for a year, [while] 'Pac was staying at the Waldorf‑Astoria and buying Rolexes and dating Madonna," EDI Mean said.

    But Tupac declined the offer. "Nah, stay with Puff," he told Biggie. "He will make you a star."



    In New York to shoot the 1994 film Above the Rim, Tupac became enmeshed with a group of notorious Queens toughs. He was modeling his character Birdie—a gangster involved in youth basketball programs—on a Haiti-born high roller called Jacques "Haitian Jack" Agnant.

    Tupac had noticed Haitian Jack at a Manhattan club, surrounded by women and champagne, and asked for an introduction. They also spent time at a Queens bar, where Jack would bring through celebrities including Madonna, Shabba Ranks, and Jamaican musician Buju Banton. (Tupac briefly dated Madonna, after Rosie Perez introduced them at the 1993 Soul Train Awards in LA.) Biggie, who ran in the same circles as Haitian Jack and his associates, warned Tupac to keep his distance from him, to no avail. Tupac liked Jack's swagger. He introduced the rapper to high-end jewelry and Versace duds, as well as the local gangstas who called the shots. "[H]e loved the respect and recognition I got in New York, and I think he wanted that same respect," Haitian Jack said.

    The two were partying at a Manhattan club called Nell's in November 1993, where Tupac met a 19-year-old woman named Ayanna Jackson. They got close on the dance floor and went back to his suite at the Le Parker Meridien Hotel. Four days later ,she met up with him at the hotel again, only to encounter not just Tupac, but Haitian Jack, Tupac's road manager Charles "Man Man" Fuller, and another man who was not identified. There, she alleged, the group gang-raped her and forced her to perform oral sex. Tupac claimed he left the bedroom when the other men entered and fell asleep. She called the police, and Tupac, Haitian Jack, and Fuller were arrested. The police also found guns, which Tupac later claimed belonged to Biggie.

    The prosecution alleged Tupac, charged with sexual abuse, sodomy, and illegal weapons possession, had offered up Jackson "as a reward for his boys." Tupac denied this, but after the trial told Vibe he blamed himself for "doing nothing" to protect Jackson from the other men. Before the trial began, Tupac's and Fuller's cases were severed from Haitian Jack's; in a deal that Tupac and his lawyer deemed too good to be true, Jack pleaded guilty to two misdemeanors and avoided jail time. Believing Haitian Jack was a snitch, Tupac told a New York Daily News reporter that Jack had set him up. (Ayanna Jackson and Haitian Jack have denied this.)

    Calling out a reputed gangster in the press is not sensible. But, ironically, after spending so much time with Jack and his ilk, Tupac had begun to feel invincible. He went wherever he wanted, wearing flashy jewelry worth thousands of dollars. Secure in his street credentials, he was convinced that nobody would mess with him.



    http://img5.fotos-hochladen.net/uplo...tdaugwpbv8.jpg

    Supporting his extended family and paying lawyers for his interminable string of court cases, Tupac's bank accounts withered. In late 1994, he agreed to record a guest verse for a rapper named Little Shawn, who was close with Puffy and Biggie. The invitation came from Little Shawn's manager, Jimmy "Henchman" Rosemond, whom Tupac had met through Haitian Jack, and Tupac was to be paid $7,000.

    On November 30, 1994, Tupac arrived stoned to Quad Recording Studios in Times Square. He came with three associates, none of whom were bodyguards, and encountered three other men he didn't know, wearing army fatigues. This was fashion from Brooklyn—Biggie's home—so Tupac assumed they were with him. He felt better about the situation when Biggie's affiliated rapper Lil' Cease yelled down to him that Biggie was upstairs recording. Puffy was there, too.

    But before Tupac's crew could get on the elevator, the men in army fatigues drew 9mm guns and ordered them to the floor. Instead, Tupac reached for his own gun. He was shot, beaten, and robbed of his jewelry. He played dead, and the assailants left, at which time he staggered into the elevator and rode it upstairs. When the doors opened, he saw a group including Puffy, Biggie, and Henchman. Tupac said the crew looked surprised and guilty, but Puffy claimed they showed him "nothing but love and concern."

    Tupac believed the incident was more than a random heist. "It was like they were mad at me," he said. He claimed to have taken five bullets, including shots to the head and through his scrotum, though forensic evidence suggested he likely shot himself.

    Bill Courtney, a retired NYPD cop who also worked hip-hop cases, believed the stick-up was a response to Tupac's Daily News comments against Haitian Jack. "A message was being sent to him not to name-drop," he said.

    "Nobody came to rob you," Henchman told Vibe in 2005. "They came to discipline you."

    Puffy and Biggie denied their involvement in the crime, or any prior knowledge of it. Haitian Jack also claimed he wasn't involved, and following a separate conviction was deported to Haiti in 2007.

    On December 1, 1994, Tupac arrived to a New York City courtroom wearing bandages and confined to a wheelchair, and was pronounced guilty of sexual abuse in the Ayanna Jackson case, though acquitted on the sodomy and weapons charges. Sentenced to a minimum of a year and a half in prison, pending appeal, his bail was set at $3 million.

    Unable to raise bail, Tupac served most of his time at Clinton Correctional Facility, a maximum-security prison in upstate New York. Me Against the World, Tupac's third album, was released soon after his prison sentence began. Tupac considered making it his swan song; he was tired of all of the music industry drama. But his passion reignited after a disturbing rumor began to sink in, one that came from people he trusted: that Biggie knew in advance about the Quad studios shooting.

    "He owed me more than to turn his head and act like he didn't know niggas was about to blow my fucking head off," he said later. And even if Biggie hadn't set him up, he should at least have been able to find out who did it. "You don't know who shot me in your hometown, these niggas from your neighborhood?"

    The way Tupac saw it, his own friend had betrayed him—a friend whom Tupac had helped to acquire fame and fortune.


    While in prison, Tupac asked his wife Keisha Morris (whom he had married while incarcerated) to relay a message to Suge Knight, the head of the volatile label Death Row Records: He was broke and needed help. On top of the lawyers' fees and everything else, his mother was losing her house.

    "Suge sent $15,000 and put it on his books," Reggie Wright Jr., Death Row's head of security, told me. Tupac was jubilant and sent Suge another message, that he'd like to see him.

    Few places in the US were farther away from Los Angeles than Dannemora, New York, where Tupac was incarcerated, but Suge began coming out. Further, Death Row offered him something no one else seemed to be able to deliver: release. Death Row's lawyer David Kenner pledged to help Tupac with his case and began working to spring him on an appeal bond.

    Suge didn't just try to recruit Tupac to his label, he offered him a place in his family, the most powerful and out-of-control family in hip-hop.



    http://img5.fotos-hochladen.net/uplo...qt1sw5kxu0.jpg
    This was a great read bro..
    "I mentioned to him (Kastro) about Makaveli Board and he said that Makaveli Board is family to him"

    I can't keep worrying bout the things in my life I can change
    Dear Lord give me the strength to fight the evil in this game
    Ooh I close my eyes and get down on my knees
    Pray to the heavens protect my family
    If I leave that's good enough for me

    -Big K.R.I.T- Good Enough

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    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
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    THX @Krizzle

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