User Tag List

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 12345
Results 61 to 65 of 65

Thread: "Self-Made Graphical Design"

  1. #61
    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Germany/Cologne
    Posts
    52
    Than/ks (Given)
    27
    Than/ks (Received)
    7
    Likes (Given)
    31
    Likes (Received)
    22
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default



    “First off, fuck your bitch and the clique you claim…”

    That opening line—that egregious, confrontational, hate-filled opening line—was one of the most unforgettable utterances ever committed to wax by the late Tupac Shakur. It’s been 20 years since the release of 2Pac’s scathingly brutal diss track “Hit ’Em Up,” a song that came to embody the venom behind the Death Row/Bad Boy beef of the mid-’90s and an easy reference for the antagonistic figure many saw 2Pac as in his final months on this earth.



    There was a palpable sense of dread hanging over hip-hop in mid-’96.

    The Death Row/Bad Boy feud had been callously hyped as an all-out war between East Coast and West Coast rappers even though there had been very little actual violence surrounding any of it at the time. But Death Row’s gangster reputation had been cemented via court cases and assault charges—and 2Pac knew both all too well, having faced numerous legal troubles since he’d burst onto the scene as a troubled-but-talented artist in late ’91.

    When the Death Row roster posed on the cover of Vibe that February, the implication was clear: this was the superpower in hip-hop. And it was hard to argue otherwise. Since The Chronic dropped in late 1992, Death Row had been in the midst of a strong run: Snoop’s Doggystyle arrived in fall 1993, the Above the Rim soundtrack in spring 1994, the Murder Was the Case soundtrack/film later that year, and Tha Dogg Pound’s Dogg Food in fall 1995. And 2Pac released his smash double-disc All Eyez On Me in February 1996.

    For some perspective, their rival Bad Boy Entertainment had only one bona fide rap star in the Notorious B.I.G. at the time. Craig Mack had been the label’s first success but it had been two years since he hit big with “Flava In Ya Ear” and Mack was looking more like a one-hit wonder by then. Future Bad Boy hip-hop artists like Ma$e and the LOX wouldn’t release albums until 1997. Most of Bad Boy’s success throughout 1995 and 1996 would come via R&B hits by acts like Faith, Total, and 112. As it pertained to hip-hop, at this particular juncture, Death Row ruled the roost.

    Time Warner had severed ties with Interscope following the controversy surrounding Dogg Food. Tha Dogg Pound’s debut was the last in a series of albums and incidents that had drawn contempt for gangsta rap and the artists who produced it, and Time Warner sold its 50 percent interest in Interscope back to the label after public outcry had reached a fever pitch. Also, Snoop was just resuming his hip-hop career following a lengthy murder trial that contributed to his notoriety but stalled his momentum following the multi-platinum success of Doggystyle and Murder Was the Case. Perhaps most notably, label mainstay and co-founder Dr. Dre had defected from Death Row in March—shortly after that infamous VIBE cover hit shelves—to launch his own Aftermath Entertainment, sans label head Suge Knight.

    And in the midst of all that instability, there was the incendiary Tupac Shakur.

    Death Row was clearly in a state of flux, with Dre’s unexpected departure, the sudden arrival of 2Pac, and the way that Suge clearly centered Pac as the label’s biggest star—a title that had been held by Snoop Doggy Dogg for three years running. Suge was no fool; coming out of prison, 2Pac was the most talked-about rapper in the industry and signing with Death Row made him even more notorious (no pun intended) than he’d been in the previous four years of his career.




    Pac had clearly been emboldened by his association with the most feared label in rap.

    The thoughtful, somber 2Pac that had released Me Against the World in the spring of 1995 while incarcerated for a sexual assault conviction seemed to disappear after Suge Knight posted his $1.4 million bail in fall 1995 and signed him to Death Row. All Eyez On Me had announced Pac as the new face of Death Row and the most confrontational and combustible personality in hip-hop. He was unapologetic and unrestricted—even with the specter of returning to prison looming pending appeals. 2Pac didn’t give a fuck anymore. And with he and Suge sharing a mutual contempt for Bad Boy Entertainment, Sean “Puffy” Combs, and the Notorious B.I.G., Pac knew exactly where to focus his rage.

    As even the most casual hip-hop fan knows, 2Pac had been shot in the lobby of Quad Studios in Manhattan in November 1994—just before he was due to go to trial for the sexual assault charge. In the aftermath of the violence and his subsequent conviction, he made it clear that he believed Biggie and Puffy—the biggest star and founder of Bad Boy Entertainment, respectively, and former friends of Pac’s—had conspired or were aware of an attempt on his life that night at Quad City. To make matters worse, shortly after the incident B.I.G. released the track “Who Shot Ya?”—a song that Pac perceived as mocking what had happened to him.

    “I wrote that muthafuckin’ song way before Tupac got shot,” Biggie told Vibe later. “It was supposed to be the intro to that shit Keith Murray was doing on Mary J. Blige’s [My Life] joint. But Puff said it was too hard.”

    But Pac didn’t believe that story—and didn’t seem to care even if it was true: “Even if that song ain’t about me. You should be, like, ‘I’m not putting it out, ’cause he might think it’s about him.’”


    So after the bailout, the signing, and the success of All Eyez On Me, Pac had to get something off of his chest and cement his status as the biggest—and possibly most-feared—rapper in hip-hop. He recruited his associates and protégés Dramacydal for the record. Rechristened The Outlaw Immortalz (subsequently just The Outlawz), the New Jersey natives had already appeared under their former moniker on Pac songs over his previous two albums, but as The Outlawz, they would make a far more memorable impression on “Hit ’Em Up.” Hussein Fatal, Khadafi and E.D.I. Mean contributed scathing verses aimed at Biggie and Puff, but when the song was recorded it was 2Pac’s venom that seemed the most pointed, his rage the most real.

    “All you niggaz gettin killed with ya mouths open Tryin’ to come up offa me, you in the clouds hopin’ Smokin dope it’s like a sherm high niggaz think they learned to fly But they burn motherfucker, you deserve to die…”

    Pac had already claimed to have slept with Biggie’s estranged wife, Bad Boy singer Faith Evans, and mocked his rival’s early days “when I used to let you sleep on the couch.” There was a personal edge to his anger that led to the song’s producer, the late Johnny J, declaring that he never wanted to work on anything like “Hit ’Em Up” again. Throughout the song, he took aim at Bad Boy associates Junior M.A.F.I.A. (“Some mark-ass bitches”) and Lil Kim (“Quick to snatch yo’ ugly ass off the streets.”) And in the infamous outro, Pac exploded in a rant against a host of others he’d taken issue with, from Prodigy of Mobb Deep (“Don’t one of you niggas got sickle-cell or something?”) to Chino XL (“Fuck you, too!”)

    When the song was recorded, Pac and the Outlawz played it for some unexpected guests in the studio.



    “Goodie MOB was up in there that night,” E.D.I. Mean explained to VladTV in 2014. “They came through right when we finished it. They were some of the first people to hear that record. They was just standing there like, ‘Oh shit.’ I’m sure—my boy T-Mo told me he was happy to hear that shit. Not happy to hear that we were going at anybody, he just liked the song. But for the most part they were just standing there like ‘oh shit.’

    “I was so hungry and just eager to prove myself at the time, I was just happy I made the record and my eight bars was solid,” explained E.D.I. “Everybody on that record was raw at what they do. Hussien Fatal was one of the best rappers from Jersey for years prior to even getting with us. And the late, great killa Khadafi was nasty in his own right. Then you got Pac on there with two verses.

    “The record was coming form a hip-hop standpoint as far as classic diss records,” he continued. “We was drawing from [Boogie Down Productions’] ‘The Bridge Is Over,’ [Ice Cube’s] ‘No Vaseline’—those were the two records that, at the point, were the pinnacle of diss records. The whole Dre and Eazy beef was classic records that come up out of beef, unfortunately. That’s where we was coming from. It wasn’t about running up on niggas and actually trying to physically harm them. It was like yo—Pac was back and this is how he’s saying it.”

    When the song dropped, it was too hot to touch. Fans eager for more East/West drama ate it up—it arguably drove up single sales of the A-side “How Do U Want It.” But there was also criticism that this particular diss track was taking things too far. Pac scoffed at the notion in an interview with Vibe.

    “Fear got stronger than love, and niggas did things they weren’t supposed to do,” Pac stated. “They know in their hearts—that’s why they’re in hell now. They can’t sleep. That’s why they’re telling all the reporters and all the people, ‘Why they doing this? They fucking up hip-hop’ and blah-blah-blah,’ cause they in hell.”

    Mobb Deep’s Prodigy was taken aback by the diss. “I was, like, ‘Oh shit. Them niggas is shittin’ on me,” he told Vibe. “He’s talking about my health. Yo, he doesn’t even know me, to be talking about shit like that. I never had any beef with Tupac. I never said his name. So that shit just hurt. I’m, like, ‘Yeah, all right, whatever. I just gotta handle that shit.’” (Mobb Deep would release a response in “Drop a Gem On ‘Em” from their 1996 album Hell On Earth, shortly before 2Pac’s murder in September.) Biggie would allude to the beef on his final album, 1997s Life After Death, but, aside from a famous one-liner on Jay Z’s “Brooklyn’s Finest,” there was never an “official” response record that explicitly called out 2Pac by name.



    In the wake of Shakur’s murder, “Hit ’Em Up” would become a chilling epitaph for a feud that seemed to spiral out of control—even more so after the Notorious B.I.G. met a similar fate in March 1997. Taken on its own merit, it’s one of the greatest diss records in hip-hop history; but attached to the moment, it was a lot more than that. Something more volatile. Something more dangerous. Twenty years later, its legacy is a bit muddy—but it’s a part of the indelible persona that was Tupac Shakur; a riveting portrait of a young outsider’s rage and fury and a testament to his charisma and power. There were people who hated Biggie after that song was released just because of that song. Maybe 2Pac didn’t fully understand the power he wielded or maybe he finally got it later but was running out of time. Regardless, it’s one of the most compelling rap records ever recorded.

    Even if it might be compelling for the all the wrong reasons.

    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.jimdo.com
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 06-30-2018 at 07:33 AM.

  2. #62
    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Germany/Cologne
    Posts
    52
    Than/ks (Given)
    27
    Than/ks (Received)
    7
    Likes (Given)
    31
    Likes (Received)
    22
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default



    Some may only recognize Thug Life as the two words infamously tattooed across 2Pac's abdomen, but interviews from the mid-90s reveal that he had big plans for the brand—he foresaw it as the name of a worldwide movement, culture, and lifestyle of a revolutionary urban lower class.

    As we all know, Shakur never lived to see this dream realized, and before any of these ideas could be put into effect Thug Life was the name of a group and an album by 'Pac and his friends. Already infamous for his first two solo albums and various run-ins with the law yet not quite the household name he would become in his final two years of life, "Thug Life: Volume 1" was released by Interscope in September 1994, just two months before the New York shooting that embattled the star with Bad Boy Records, five months before beginning his eleven-month stay at Clinton Correctional Facility, a year before signing on with Suge Knight and Death Row, and two years before his Las Vegas murder.



    This album thus provides a snapshot of a pivotal albeit overlooked time in Shakur's life.
    His incarceration strongly influenced the volatile and deeply philosophical recordings of his Death Row days, which produced the most celebrated and controversial music of his catalog, and his output immediately before might serve as a suggestion of another path his career may have taken had he faced different circumstances.

    Perhaps most significantly, the Thug Life project is the only full album that places 2Pac in the context of a rap group. Shakur was affiliated with a few different lineups in his recording years, beginning of course with Digital Underground in the early 1990s. After achieving superstardom as a solo entity, another group of friends and frequent collaborators credited as Dramacydal began to appear on his records, the group that would later evolve into Outlawz. With 2Pac as the obvious focal point, the Thug Life lineup included Inglewood's Big Syke, who would go on to a moderately successful solo career and record with Outlawz as Mussolini; Los Angeles rappers Macodoshis and Rated R, who would later be convicted of murder; and 'Pac's elder stepbrother Mopreme. While not an official member, 'Pac's friend Stretch from the Digital Underground days, a frequent producer and guest rapper on the first two 2Pac LPs, raps on two tracks and produces five; he too would be gunned down in late 1995.

    "Thug Life: Volume 1" maintains an unusual balance between a group album and a 2Pac project. A far greater rapper and character than his buddies, 'Pac's larger than life persona is the immediate star, and he is the only member afforded solo cuts. He's also the driving creative force; more often than not his verses provide the backbone and direction of the songs, and the others merely echo his sentiments. As their name suggests, the Thug Life boys seek to engrain the listener into the day-to-day existence of a West Coast thug. While this may sound terribly proverbial on paper, they share with 2Pac passion and charisma that usually compensates for any lyrical and conceptual deficiencies. The conviction that each exhibits makes it hard not to feel the desperation, entrapment, injustice, and do-or-die mentality that they purvey, and this is what makes their narratives so compelling. At an age where most young folks hope to explore and enjoy the world's myriad opportunities, these men barely into their twenties felt hopelessly ensnared by societal factors beyond their control and turned to lives of crime—lives for which their criminal records indicate were hardly embellished in their rhymes.

    The legendary opener "Bury Me a G" begins with a rugged drum pattern that blends with a smooth sample from Isley Brothers' "For the Love of You." Of all the hip hop tracks that have utilized this sample (Nas' "Good Morning," Master P's "Tryin' 2 Do Something," Ms. Tee's "If He Don't Trick" among countless others) I can't think of any for which it sounds more fitting. A tasteful, soulful, hopeful, and relaxing track musically, the somber chorus ("I ain't got time for bitches / Gotta keep my mind on my muthafuckin' riches / Even when I die, they won't worry me / Mama don't cry, bury me a G") makes for a poignant if unlikely combination. 2Pac opens and closes with two sixteen bar verses, while the other four MCs have eight bars apiece. The track is melodic, well-arranged, and alluring, but it's also a classic because it embodies the paradox that Thug Life explores throughout the LP: at face, celebration of the thug life, but simultaneously lamenting it below the surface.

    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.jimdo.com
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 06-30-2018 at 07:31 AM.

  3. #63
    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Germany/Cologne
    Posts
    52
    Than/ks (Given)
    27
    Than/ks (Received)
    7
    Likes (Given)
    31
    Likes (Received)
    22
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default



    The first thing Corey Taylor says when the conversation begins is, "Hey, I'm doing alright. It's all good. I just love the irony of me doing an interview in Ultimate-Guitar, hah hah hah." My response is that UG covers singers, keyboard players and drummers. Corey responds by saying, "I'm a little bit of all of those, hah hah hah. I'm holding it down." It is a telling statement from the Slipknot and Stour Sour singer because Taylor is not just the frontman for those two bands but a concert promoter - Knotfest is his creation - and novelist. But he is obviously most well-known as a singer and the conversation begins with another legendary vocalist who played a big part in Taylor's life as an artist.



    UG: What are your memories of first meeting Ronnie James Dio?

    CT: We met a couple times in passing but it wasn't anything major. The real time I really got to officially meet him and hang out with was honestly right before he passed. We were both at the Revolver Golden God awards in LA. And we were both up for Best Vocalist.

    It's probably the one time I was rooting for somebody else to win because I'd just been such a fan of Ronnie forever. So I'm like, "Oh dude, he's gonna blow me out of the water. What? Are you crazy?"

    Who won?

    Of course he won and I was stoked. I was doing an interview backstage and he'd just gotten the statue so he was coming down and me and Jose Mangin from Sirius looked over and there's Ronnie James Dio. I was like, "Holy sh-t." So we kind of dragged into the interview with us like a couple of little kids and we were like, "Oh, my god. Superman's here." We brought him in and I mean the dude was - what can I say?

    Ronnie was cool?

    You've probably heard it a million times but I can tell you just from my experience, he was one of the most down-to-earth, gracious, amazing dudes I've ever met. He was everything you want your hero to be when you meet him. The thing that was cool about him was he was humble but at the same time he was also very honest, man. He had no problem with calling bs on people especially old school and new school alike. I really loved that about him and I always thought that was so refreshing. I've definitely taken some pointers from it.

    Did Ronnie know about Slipknot and the kind of music you played?

    Yeah, man. He was very aware. He came into the interview and obviously I'm like a huge fan and I'm trying not to fan boy on him and I was totally fan boying on him, which I am wont to do half the time. He was like, "Likewise" and it blew me away. To have that kind of respect reciprocated, I wasn't expecting it. Let's put it that way. He really was very magnanimous about it and he was very, very cool. He knew my work and knew what I'd done and not only liked it but appreciated it.
    That must have been a remarkable moment for you.
    That's one of a handful of memories that I really, really cherish.

    What was it about Ronnie's voice that so touched you?

    He could just do anything. I think the thing that really infuriated me and other singers is that he just made it look so goddamn easy. You know? I asked him what his warm-up is and he's like, "I don't have one." And I just went, "Really? Do you just walk out like that? That sucks, dude!" I mean it sucks for me.

    What is your warm-up routine?

    I don't really have one either but I kinda do a couple of different things just to make sure I have a voice. He'd hit a couple notes and go, "I'm ready to go." The thing I loved the most about him is that he really could sing it all. He could sing the softer passages with a clarity and a beauty that is really kind of lost on a lot of people and especially with his style. There was such a great blend of what I considered classical and just raw roughness. So he could really ghost in-between the cracks and really be able to do anything. A great singer should be able to sing the ballads and the rockers.

    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.jimdo.com
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 05-03-2018 at 08:51 AM.

  4. #64
    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Germany/Cologne
    Posts
    52
    Than/ks (Given)
    27
    Than/ks (Received)
    7
    Likes (Given)
    31
    Likes (Received)
    22
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    He could go from songs that were very sweet and poetic to stuff like "Stand up and Shout" for example or "Mob Rules" actually, which is more to the point. He could just gravel it up with anyone and I just thought it was killer. His range was ridiculous. His passion you could feel it and you could hear it and you just don't get that a lot. Especially with someone was doing it still exceptionally right up until before his death. At his age, a lot of guys from his generation start to drop the songs down a little lower, a little lower - I'm not gonna point out any names - and it just gets to the point where the songs are damn near unrecognizable. He was still giving it just as good as he got it and that's just huge, huge inspiration for me.

    Are there contemporary metal singers who will leave their stamp like Dio did?

    I think there's a handful. It's a different age and a different generation and people get into music for different reasons now. Without me talking a bunch of sh-t on people, you can usually tell the people who are kinda punching the timecard as opposed to the people who are genuinely invested in it. It's something in your soul that needs to do this. I mean there's a handful of 'em out there.



    Who would you name check as singers who are bringing it?

    Just off the top of my head, Lzzy Hale is definitely one who I think people really need to keep an eye on. Because as modern rock as they are, her voice is so gnarly and they are by far one of the best live bands I've seen. They do it for real and every note of it is for real. It's just something I think has never been captured in any of their recordings.

    I think they're really gona nail it with this next album. I think people are really gonna go like, "Holy god." There's a great blend between like AC/DC and Dio with that band and I mean that. That's just from an outside standpoint. That band is gonna change a lot of attitudes about things and she's an incredible singer. The more she gets out there and the more she does, the more it becomes painfully obvious she's not just a woman singer. She is just a badass singer. I'd put her up against any of these chumps that are in the bigger bands to be honest.

    How did you choose "Rainbow in the Dark" for the Dio album?



    "Rainbow in the Dark" is one of my favorite songs and it has been since I was a kid. When I was younger in second or third grade, we would run home to watch the brand new network - MTV, hah hah hah. It was destination TV and it was like, "Oh, my god, dude." You're seeing not only all these songs and bands you've heard but all this stuff you've never heard before.

    That's where you first heard the Dio song?

    "Rainbow in the Dark" was one of 'em. There was just something about that song and something about the video. The video was fairly simple but there was something about it that was just awesome. I can just remember that song getting stuck in my head constantly. It stayed with me over the years and it's still one of my Top 10 best rock tunes ever written - in my opinion.

    There was no doubt then about which Dio song you were going to choose for "This Is Your Life."



    When I got the chance to do this, I knew that was the song I wanted to do and luckily it was open. So I immediately called dibs.


    You really captured the spirit of that song. It had Ronnie's vibe for sure but it sounded like Corey Taylor.



    Thanks, man. You never want to do a carbon copy and you want to give it your own thing while at the same time respecting the original. Because if the original wasn't good you wouldn't be singing it in the first place. So yeah, we wanted to give it a modern vibe and at the same time not lose the soul of it because there's just something about the way that song is put together that makes you want to sing along. Of course I don't have Dio's pipes so we brought it down a little bit [lowered the key] and gave it a modern and darker vibe. At the same time we just kind of went for it and I think it came together really, really well.

    You're being roasted at the upcoming Roast on the Range with Sebastian Bach as emcee. What are you expecting?



    Well, it's a roast. If you don't know what a roast is at this point in your life then you shouldn't be involved in one to be honest. I know just from experience some people can take offense because they don't understand what the spirit of it is. I mean I was stoked me and when they said they wanted me to be the guy under the coals as it is. I was all about it.

    You can poke fun at yourself?

    Nobody makes fun of himself more than I do to be honest. I think the death of a sense of humor is to take yourself way too seriously. I learned a long time ago, I'm the last person who should be doing that, hah hah hah. You know? So I'm ecstatic and it's people I know and people I'm friends with and people I've met in passing. I think it's gonna be great. I feel bad for Sebastian, dude, because everybody is a target at these things. If he thinks I'm gonna get the worst, I think he's crazy.

    Sebastian Bach may be in the gun sights?



    Hah hah hah. Honestly? I couldn't have asked for a better roast master. It's like, "Which is the better of the two evils to go after?"

    I think it's gonna be great.

    You went through some darker times when you were younger so being able to laugh at yourself now must have taken a lot of healing.

    Yeah, for the most part. I've always been very extroverted. Let's put it that way. Maybe it's because I moved around a lot and I had to make friends on-the-fly. I was homeless off-and-on for a while. I had a rough childhood. Without getting into the nuts and bolts of it, there were a lot of times where my childhood sucked. So on one hand it gave me the ingredients that eventually came out in Slipknot, which was really the only way I was able to truly define and then let go of those emotions and that negativity and try to make something positive out of it.



    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.jimdo.com

    Finding music really saved your life in some fashion?

    But at the same time, I grew up and I was very much like, "Sure I'll jump off the roof. Sure. Why not? I'll take this food from lunch and shove it in my pocket and offer people ravioli. Sure - why not? Of course, it's school.



    Who gives a crap?" Maybe that was one of the reasons why I became the singer I am now. The thing I realized and maybe this was because I realized something in myself or I saw it in other people is that there is a very dangerous line can be drawn where you're either living or surviving. It really comes down to that. A lot of people who survive, use their past and upbringing as a crutch to get away with terrible behavior. Or to kind of hold themselves back from evolving and getting past it. Some of these people don't have the resources I've had and I've been fortunate to have in being able to express myself. Or maybe the talent and the tools to be able to try to do that.

    You're right. Not everybody has that creative outlet to find some sense of peace.

    But at the same time it makes a lot of do really kind of linger in it and they dwell on it. They don't allow themselves to really start living. I have my bouts just like everybody else. I get locked in my own head and I curl up in my own defeatism and whatnot.

    That's hard to believe because you've had so much success.

    I can be an absolute c-cksucker to be around. But luckily I have great people around me who pull me back. They give me the proverbial slap in the face and say, "Snap out of it guy." I kind of trend a little more on the living side of the fence. What you gonna get dwelling in all that bullsh-t? It happened. All I can do now is try to make sure it doesn't happen to my family and doesn't happen to the people I care about. It's just simple.

    When you look back to the first Slipknot record, what that a cathartic time for you?



    Oh dude, yeah, hah. Trust me, I'm night and day from who that guy was because that little 25-year old kid was a f--king nightmare to be around a lot of times. I was moody; I was cross. I was a drunk and it was brutal being that guy. But I think I had to be that guy to get started. I let all that sh-t build up inside of me and I just f--kin' threw it up onto the tape basically. I mean you can hear me throwing up in a lot of that sh-t.

    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.jimdo.com
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 06-30-2018 at 02:41 AM.

  5. #65
    Black Jesuz LesaneParishCrookz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Germany/Cologne
    Posts
    52
    Than/ks (Given)
    27
    Than/ks (Received)
    7
    Likes (Given)
    31
    Likes (Received)
    22
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Danny Clinch scoops me up at the Toms River Bus Terminal, New Jersey, a short distance from where he grew up and still lives today. He’s likely the only guy in this blue-collar town sporting a fedora and Western boots.

    It’s a fitting look for a rock photojournalist who’s images have made the covers and pages of Vanity Fair, Rolling Stone and The New York Times.



    Clinch is a storyteller – traditionally through his photos, shooting everyone from Beastie Boys to Johnny Cash over a career that saw him go from sneaking into concerts without a press pass to interning with Annie Liebovitz.

    Video work has been his storytelling medium of choice, having directed live concert films with the Foo Fighters, Jay-Z, Dispatch, Ani DiFranco and Ben Harper and also acting as the creative force behind Pearl Jam’s ‘Lightning Bolt’ video.

    http://www.bilder-upload.eu/upload/1...1529266766.png

    He’s a storyteller on this grey December morning, too, as we head to Three on the Tree Productions, his studio in Hell’s Kitchen where he’s wrapping up his third book, Still Moving, for release later this year.



    “As I’m looking through the photos with my editor and designer, I’m showing them why I like each one. Occasionally, they just say to me, ‘You know what? That’s a good photo. But the story is better,’” Clinch says, navigating the Garden State Parkway.



    The visual rock journalist started with a thousand photos and is down to the nitty gritty, having emerged from a process he likens to choosing his favourite child.

    For as much thought and care as he puts into his work, he’s found that the spontaneous moments are often his favourites, like when he spotted Thom Yorke sitting in a circular window in a Dublin Hotel, winding down after a show and chatting with friends.

    “Sometimes there are these found moments,” he smiles. “You walk in and there’s a photograph right there – the real moments that happen. I tend to gravitate towards those.”

    As we exit the Lincoln Tunnel, Clinch points out that we made the drive in an hour and 15 minutes exactly; he has a thing for well-executed missions into Manhattan. And in those 75 minutes, Clinch shares the backstories behind a few of his favourite shots.

    “I’m going to start with this Eddie Vedder photo I took in 1992 at Waterloo Village. It was early in my career and I went to Lollapalooza with a friend of mine, Tim Donnelly, who was asked to do a story about Eddie for the Surfrider Foundation.



    [Pearl Jam's debut album] Ten had come out the year before, but it had blown up that summer.


    “I brought my camera, as I did everywhere back then. I didn’t have any access to anyone and Tim said, ‘Why don’t you roll with me when I do this interview. He’s a super cool guy, and maybe we get some photos.’ We weren’t allowed backstage, but Eddie came to hang out with us.

    So we walked around and found a quiet spot behind this trailer and sat down by this fence. We were telling stories. Timmy was talking surf and Eddie was telling us about the kinds of activism he does around the surfing community.

    “The interesting thing for me was that it was really early in my career. And to meet someone who was so incredibly humble was amazing. Then, next thing we know, we’re in the pit, among everybody and this really quiet, humble guy who had just been telling us stories is climbing up the scaffolding, screaming at the top of his lungs and throwing himself all over the place. The contrast between the guy on the stage and the guy we had just talked to is something I will never forget.”

    “There’s a session that everybody always asks me about with Tupac Shakur in 1993. I shot a lot of hip hop back in the day and there was always a really big entourage if you were doing an album packaging or editorial. It was always a lot of people – way more than necessary.

    “Then I got the assignment from Rolling Stone to shoot Tupac. And I was excited about it, really excited about getting a Rolling Stone shoot. Even though they told me the photo was only going to run over a quarter-page, I was envisioning a Rolling Stone cover. At the time, I was not only doing really loose, documentary-style photography I had also taken this old 4×5 camera, which is a very slow portrait-style camera. So I decided to really concentrate on that.

    “So Tupac shows up – with just one guy. And he was really excited about being photographed. He was really professional. He showed up on time, ready to go, and had bought a couple of different shirts and a Thug Life jacket. We got started shooting a few photographs. He was really intrigued by this big old-view camera where you put the hood over your head and you get in there. It’s a slow process. He was super photogenic and the camera loved him.

    “At one point he said, ‘Let me change it up,’ and he took his shirt off and you could see all his tattoos – the Thug Life tattoo and the scars on his chest. I don’t think I would have ever asked him to take off his shirt. Collaboration can be a small part of a session, but it can really make a big difference, and he was really into it. So we started to shoot with the shirt off, which for me, became the epic photo. They ran the photo as a quarter-page. Then three years later, he’s killed and that photo wound up on the cover of Rolling Stone.”

    HTTP://www.andreaspennophotography.de
    Last edited by LesaneParishCrookz; 06-24-2018 at 05:35 AM.

Similar Threads

  1. **Post Ya Favo Makaveli Lyricz**
    By BuCa in forum Lyrics
    Replies: 49
    Last Post: 09-16-2014, 08:18 PM
  2. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-08-2012, 07:41 PM
  3. Song that made Pac cry on his deathbed
    By treytyson96 in forum Makaveli Discussions
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 12-04-2011, 08:06 AM
  4. "Made Niggaz" - Opinions Please
    By mweb in forum Makaveli Theories
    Replies: 56
    Last Post: 10-01-2011, 07:48 AM
  5. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-18-2011, 11:11 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •