User Tag List

Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: The Arizona ‘religious rights’ bill, how do you feel about that ?

  1. #1
    Gold Member cribby1983's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    608
    Than/ks (Given)
    180
    Than/ks (Received)
    87
    Likes (Given)
    338
    Likes (Received)
    256
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    27 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default The Arizona ‘religious rights’ bill, how do you feel about that ?

    Lets talk it over. How do you feel about the Arizona religious rights bill ?




    The Arizona ‘religious rights’ bill — and where the fight might move next

    BY JAIME FULLER
    February 24 at 6:30 am
    Updated at 11:30 a.m.







    Arizona lawmakers passed a bill Thursday that allows businesses in the state to deny service to LGBT customers on religious grounds. The bill has not been signed by Gov. Jan Brewer (R), who told reporters at the National Governors Association this week that she was in no rush to decide the bill's fate.

    As states and federal courts have slowly expanded gay rights, groups pushing for increased religious protections have tried to coax momentum in the other direction, through both law and lawsuit.
    The catalyst for the recent flood of religious exemption legislation seems to have been a number of court cases that were decided in favor of LGBT clients who were denied wedding services. In August 2013, the New Mexico Supreme Court said that a photographer who refused to document a same-sex commitment ceremony broke the state's anti-discrimination law. The Washington state attorney general filed a consumer-protection suit against a florist who declined to provide flowers for a same-sex wedding ceremony. A state judge in Colorado ruled last December that a baker can't send away same-sex customers for religious reasons.

    A similar religious exemption battle is brewing over the Affordable Care Act's contraception mandate. The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Wood Specialties Corp. v. Sebelius — which deal with the companies' religious reservations about providing the mandated contraception coverage — on March 25, 2014.


    Arizona is the first state to pass a bill on religious freedoms specifically addressing LGBT rights. Here are other states where legislators have floated such laws, most of which have fizzled out in the last few weeks:


    Kansas

    The Kansas legislature was considering a bill similar to Arizona's until last week, when senators from both parties decided not to pass the House-approved bill, saying it promoted discrimination. State representative Patricia Sloop, who voted no on the House bill, agreed. She explained her vote in the House Journal: "I strongly support religious freedom, but this bill is not about religious freedom. In my opinion, this is about legalized discrimination, and I cannot vote in support of this."
    Many of the lawmakers who voted against the bill said there was too much overlap with the religious protection law already passed in April 2013, the Kansas Preservation of Religious Freedom Act. Like the federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act, it states that religious freedom can be limited only by the “least restrictive means of furthering that compelling government interest.” Eighteen states, including Arizona, have passed such legislation since the Supreme Court said the Religious Freedom Restoration Act does not apply in state courts in 1997.


    Tennessee

    The Tennessee State Judiciary Committee was supposed to consider SB 2566 last Tuesday, a bill that would allow businesses that cater to wedding ceremonies the opportunity to deny same-sex clients if they would interfere with “sincerely held religious beliefs.” However the bill's sponsor, state Sen. Mike Bell, withdrew his sponsorship and pulled the bill before it was debated, releasing a statement that said:
    The text of the Religious Freedom Act never allowed a restaurant or hospital to refuse service to anyone. I would never introduce legislation that attempts to limit the civil rights of any Tennessean, whether straight or gay. The bill was designed to protect a pastor, rabbi, or singer from being sued and forced to participate in a same-sex ceremony against their will.

    With that, the chance of a measure similar to Arizona's passing in Tennessee seems slim. Tennessee currently has a ban on same-sex marriages, an amendment that passed in 2006 with 81 percent of the vote, although four same-sex couples filed a lawsuit against the state in October 2013, calling the amendment unconstitutional. The bills recently under consideration in the legislature were intended to preempt any changes that these lawsuits could prompt, as well as any lawsuits against vendors who deny services in the future. The legislation's opponents called it the "turn the gays away" bill.


    Idaho


    The Idaho legislature was considering two bills related to religious protections: HB 427 — a bill that would protect businesses facing legal recourse for denying services for religious reasons, which the House unanimously decided to send back to committee last week, and HB 426 -- a bill that would prohibit the state from revoking the occupational licenses of businesses that denied services for religious reasons, which never even got a committee hearing. The sponsor of HB 427, state Rep. Lynn Luker said in a statement explaining the bill's step backward: "Many misinterpreted the intent to be a sword for discrimination. I respect the concerns that I heard and therefore want to find the right language to balance those concerns.”
    More than 250 protesters gathered outside the state Capitol during the bill's hearing on Feb. 5. At that hearing, Brian Thom, bishop of the Episcopal Church of Idaho, testified that the bill would "distort a protection of religious freedom." The state's attorney general thought both bills would be ripe for constitutional challenge if passed.


    South Dakota


    Last week, the Senate Judiciary Committee in South Dakota rejected SB 128, which aimed to "protect the citizens and businesses of South Dakota regarding speech pertaining to views on sexual orientation and to provide for the defense of such citizens and businesses." Republican state Sen. Mark Kirkeby called it “a mean, nasty, hateful, vindictive bill.” Earlier in the year, the Judiciary Committee also tabled a bill that would have allowed churches the right to deny religious services, saying that was a right the clergy already had.


    Utah

    State Sen. Stuart Reid is sponsoring a Religious Liberties Amendment, which would allow businesses to deny services on religious grounds in a way similar to the Arizona legislation. He is drafting two other bills pertaining to religious protection. The Deseret News reported in late January that "general descriptions indicate they would protect individual religious conscience rights, require religious freedom instruction in public schools, and establish a nondiscrimination law that 'avoids sexual politics.'"
    The other religious protection legislation being considered in Utah is considerably narrower, dealing only with religious organizations, and not believers writ large. Some state legislators are hoping to get an amendment on November's ballot that would give churches legal protection from conducting marriages that go against their religious beliefs. The amendment's sponsor, Rep. Jacob Anderegg, told the Salt-Lake Tribune in December: "The truth is, the main reason I’m proposing this is that I just want people to relax. If they know they have their federal religious guarantees in writing, I hope they will just relax." The day after Anderegg introduced the amendment, the state's constitutional ban on same-sex marriage was struck down by a federal court — a decision the state is challenging. Before this amendment — or Reid's — can get on the 2014 ballot, it needs to earn two-thirds support from the House and Senate.
    Last August, Jonathan Johnson, executive vice president of Overstock.com, began a campaign pushing for the same protections offered in Anderegg's amendment, and started the First Freedom PAC as a way to raise money for the effort.


    Mississippi

    The Mississippi Senate passed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act at the end of January, which says that the state cannot "burden a person's right to the exercise of religion" and added "In God We Trust" to the state seal. The bill would need to survive the House, which currently has a Republican majority.
    The legislation is very broad — and lack of specificity and the probability of discrimination are what doomed many of the other religious freedom bills being considered around the country. State Senator Hob Bryan said he was worried because the legislation's expansive decree would protect all religions during floor debate on the bill. “This bill applies to all religions, including Islam, Buddhism and New Age religions," he said soon after the bill made it through the Senate, according to the Associated Press. "We need to think carefully about the implications of it.”


    The rest

    State senators in Oklahoma sponsored a Religious Freedom Act in 2014, while members of the Hawaii House of Representatives put forward a similar bill in December, which got pushed ahead to this year's legislative session. The bills haven't moved forward much yet, but haven't gone the way of Kansas and Idaho's either. Religious freedom bills were also introduced in Nevada and Colorado last year. In Nevada, the legislation is stuck in committee; in Colorado the bill failed along party lines. Opponents thought that the legislation would legalize discrimination against gay people.
    Religious organizations in Oregon, including the Oregon Family Council, are trying to get the "Protect Religious Freedoms Initiative" on the state's ballot this November.

    Ohio representatives introduced HB 376 in January, which the state's American Civil Liberties Union branch has said it opposes strongly: "HB 376 opens a Pandora’s box of claims that a state or local law imposes on someone’s religious beliefs. Because HB 376, by its terms, forbids the government to place even an insubstantial burden on religion, even a trivial burden may be contested. For example, a person could file a lawsuit against a municipality for ticketing their car during a church service, claiming imposition on their right to worship."

    Tim Derickson, one of the bill's sponsors, told the Dayton Daily News: “What we’re hoping to do is to put in statues that are already in place and other states and the federal level already has. We’re always being challenged. We have such diversity in religious views and religious differences, why not put into statues what we’re already practicing in the courts.”Another of the bill's sponsors, Bill Patmon, has said he is confident that the legislation will end up on the governor's desk by the end of this year's session.


    Source:
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/...vs-gay-rights/
    Writing a verse every day, keeps the psychologist away.

  2. #2
    New York State Of Mind Ghostface's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    8,942
    Than/ks (Given)
    450
    Than/ks (Received)
    688
    Likes (Given)
    423
    Likes (Received)
    1582
    Dislikes (Given)
    8
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    331 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    It's so great to see this country take steps backwards smh. Its also great to see religious people only using the good book to judge other people but not themselves. I come to realize alot of Christians barely know the Bible and when they do shit like this, little do they know, it shows

  3. #3
    Fight me. kace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    11,687
    Than/ks (Given)
    283
    Than/ks (Received)
    618
    Likes (Given)
    668
    Likes (Received)
    1316
    Dislikes (Given)
    37
    Dislikes (Received)
    6
    Mentioned
    415 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I'm genuinely hurt by it. Hurt for those who have to go through such discrimination that one group of people already fought for. Why are we going backwards? What happened to separation of church and state? First chance I get, I'm out of this fuck place. Fuck America.

  4. #4
    New York State Of Mind Ghostface's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    8,942
    Than/ks (Given)
    450
    Than/ks (Received)
    688
    Likes (Given)
    423
    Likes (Received)
    1582
    Dislikes (Given)
    8
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    331 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    How are they going to know who is gay or not? Not every gay person dresses like ru Paul, this is really dumb

  5. #5
    Outlaw Soulja Don_McFly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,683
    Than/ks (Given)
    529
    Than/ks (Received)
    436
    Likes (Given)
    2263
    Likes (Received)
    1312
    Dislikes (Given)
    7
    Dislikes (Received)
    4
    Mentioned
    199 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    I guess gay is the new black from back in the day smh..
    "Every second I'm great-full
    You never know how much time
    You got left breathing
    Can die tonight or the next evening
    Live like ya mean it" -Young Noble

  6. #6
    Gold Member cribby1983's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    608
    Than/ks (Given)
    180
    Than/ks (Received)
    87
    Likes (Given)
    338
    Likes (Received)
    256
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    27 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tha_Don View Post
    I guess gay is the new black from back in the day smh..


    It is a shame, that supposedly educated people, politicians, are even debating about something like that in 2014.
    I mean what is wrong with the educational system in America ? Don`t they teach history over there ?
    Writing a verse every day, keeps the psychologist away.

  7. #7
    New York State Of Mind Ghostface's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    8,942
    Than/ks (Given)
    450
    Than/ks (Received)
    688
    Likes (Given)
    423
    Likes (Received)
    1582
    Dislikes (Given)
    8
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    331 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    The bill was vetoed

  8. #8
    Gold Member cribby1983's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    608
    Than/ks (Given)
    180
    Than/ks (Received)
    87
    Likes (Given)
    338
    Likes (Received)
    256
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    27 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireS...-bill-22688951


    Arizona Religious Bill That Angered Gays Vetoed

    PHOENIX February 27, 2014 (AP)


    Gov. Jan Brewer on Wednesday vetoed a Republican bill that set off a national debate over gay rights, religion and discrimination and subjected Arizona to blistering criticism from major corporations and political leaders from both parties.

    Loud cheers erupted outside the Capitol building immediately after Brewer made her announcement.

    "My agenda is to sign into law legislation that advances Arizona," Brewer said at a news conference. "I call them like I see them despite the cheers or the boos from the crowd. After weighing all the arguments, I have vetoed Senate Bill 1062 moments ago."

    The Republican governor said she gave the legislation careful deliberation in talking to her lawyers, citizens, businesses and lawmakers on both sides of the debate. Her office said it received more than 40,000 calls and emails on the legislation, with most of them urging a veto.

    Brewer said the bill "could divide Arizona in ways we could not even imagine and no one would ever want." The bill was broadly worded and could result in unintended negative consequences, she added.

    The bill backed by Republicans in the Legislature was designed to give added protection from lawsuits to people who assert their religious beliefs in refusing service to gays. But opponents called it an open attack on gays that invited discrimination.

    The bill thrust Arizona into the national spotlight last week after both chambers of the state legislature approved it. As the days passed, more and more groups, politicians and average citizens weighed in against SB1062. Many took to social media to criticize the bill.

    Prominent business groups said it would be another black eye for the state that saw a national backlash over its 2010 immigration-crackdown law, SB1070, and warned that businesses looking to expand into the state may not do so if bill became law.

    Companies such as Apple Inc. and American Airlines, and politicians including GOP Sen. John McCain and former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney were among those who urged Brewer to veto the legislation. The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee, which is overseeing preparations for the 2015 game, came out with a statement against the legislation. The Hispanic National Bar Association on Wednesday said it canceled its 2015 convention in Phoenix over the measure.

    In addition, three Republicans who had voted for the bill reversed course and said it was a mistake. They said in a letter to Brewer that while the intent of their vote "was to create a shield for all citizens' religious liberties, the bill has been mischaracterized by its opponents as a sword for religious intolerance."

    Enough lawmakers have said they're against the bill to make it certain there will be no override of the governor's veto.

    SB 1062 allows people to claim their religious beliefs as a defense against claims of discrimination. Backers cite a New Mexico Supreme Court decision that allowed a gay couple to sue a photographer who refused to document their wedding, even though the law that allowed that suit doesn't exist in Arizona.

    Sen. Al Melvin, a Republican who is running for governor and voted for the bill, said he is disappointed by the veto.

    "I am sorry to hear that Gov. Brewer has vetoed this bill. I'm sure it was a difficult choice for her, but it is a sad day when protecting liberty is considered controversial," Melvin said.

    Democrats said it was a veiled attempt to legally discriminate against gay people and could allow people to break nearly any law and cite religious freedom as a defense.

    Democratic Rep. Ruben Gallego said he would remain vigilant of other legislation that could also target gays.

    "The effect is that again we got a black eye," Gallego said. "But it also shows that Arizona can stand united."

    Democratic leaders in the Legislature thanked the governor for vetoing the bill. But they said it should not have ever made it to her desk.

    "It's time to move Arizona forward and make sure that something like Senate Bill 1062 never happens again," Senate Minority Leader Anna Tovar said. "It's time to show the nation and the world what Arizona is truly about."

    The Center for Arizona Policy helped write the bill and argued it was needed to protect against increasingly activist federal courts and simply clarifies existing state law.

    "It is truly a disappointing day in our state and nation when lies and personal attacks can over shadow the truth," said Cathi Herrod, the leader of the group.

    Similar religious-protection legislation has been introduced in Ohio, Mississippi, Idaho, South Dakota, Tennessee and Oklahoma, but Arizona's plan is the only one that has been passed by a state Legislature. The legislation was withdrawn in Ohio on Wednesday, and similar bills are stalled in Idaho and Kansas.

    The push in Arizona comes as an increasing number of conservative states grapple with ways to counter the growing legality of gay marriage. Arizona has a ban on gay marriage.

    Federal judges have recently struck down those bans in Utah, Oklahoma and Virginia, but those decisions are under appeal.

    On Wednesday, a federal judge declared Texas' ban on gay marriage unconstitutional, but he left it in place until an appeals court can rule on the case.
    Writing a verse every day, keeps the psychologist away.

  9. #9
    Outlaw Soulja Don_McFly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,683
    Than/ks (Given)
    529
    Than/ks (Received)
    436
    Likes (Given)
    2263
    Likes (Received)
    1312
    Dislikes (Given)
    7
    Dislikes (Received)
    4
    Mentioned
    199 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cribby1983 View Post
    It is a shame, that supposedly educated people, politicians, are even debating about something like that in 2014.
    I mean what is wrong with the educational system in America ? Don`t they teach history over there ?
    Yea, alot of false history, school system is fucked foreal.
    "Every second I'm great-full
    You never know how much time
    You got left breathing
    Can die tonight or the next evening
    Live like ya mean it" -Young Noble

  10. #10
    Gold Member cribby1983's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    608
    Than/ks (Given)
    180
    Than/ks (Received)
    87
    Likes (Given)
    338
    Likes (Received)
    256
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    27 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by Tha_Don View Post
    Yea, alot of false history, school system is fucked foreal.
    They should be teaching about social structures and how to be openminded for all aspects a social society has to offer.



    And how do you make people becoming more openminded?


    Confrontation!

    Being prejudiced against someone or something is nothing else but having fear for someone or something.

    Prejudice is fear!

    Those who are prejudiced against gays, black people or whoever else must be confronted with them. Those who came up with that debate (christians, church) must be living in same-sex households to realize that there is no need to fear them. Only then they will change their minds and the more minds you change now, the less people will have that fear, the prejudice in the future.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-27-2013, 10:26 PM
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-08-2013, 10:05 AM
  3. U.S. religious leaders condemn "anti-Muslim" frenzy
    By Sahar in forum Around the World
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-08-2010, 10:54 AM
  4. Arizona Discussion
    By Kurupt in forum Around the World
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 05-30-2010, 11:31 PM
  5. David Carradine (Bill From Kill Bill) Found Dead
    By _- CMakaveli -_ in forum Entertainment Daily
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-07-2009, 07:03 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •