User Tag List

Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Faith Evans

  1. #1
    Member Mug_Life's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    60
    Than/ks (Given)
    16
    Than/ks (Received)
    21
    Likes (Given)
    24
    Likes (Received)
    40
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Faith Evans

    I really want to see how they are going to portray the Faith and Tupac situation. If they are shown as sleeping together in the movie Faith will surely sue. As we all know Faith has always vehemently denied sleeping with Tupac. I have read her book and she goes into quite a detailed account of events leading up to, during and after the whole thing.
    I suppose we will never know the truth.

  2. #2
    Born 2 Revolutionise Executive Director Krizzle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Space
    Posts
    15,159
    Than/ks (Given)
    323
    Than/ks (Received)
    550
    Likes (Given)
    1649
    Likes (Received)
    873
    Dislikes (Given)
    4
    Dislikes (Received)
    3
    Mentioned
    281 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mug_Life View Post
    I really want to see how they are going to portray the Faith and Tupac situation. If they are shown as sleeping together in the movie Faith will surely sue. As we all know Faith has always vehemently denied sleeping with Tupac. I have read her book and she goes into quite a detailed account of events leading up to, during and after the whole thing.
    I suppose we will never know the truth.
    In her book does she admit sleeping with Pac?
    "I mentioned to him (Kastro) about Makaveli Board and he said that Makaveli Board is family to him"

    I can't keep worrying bout the things in my life I can change
    Dear Lord give me the strength to fight the evil in this game
    Ooh I close my eyes and get down on my knees
    Pray to the heavens protect my family
    If I leave that's good enough for me

    -Big K.R.I.T- Good Enough

  3. #3
    Member Mug_Life's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    60
    Than/ks (Given)
    16
    Than/ks (Received)
    21
    Likes (Given)
    24
    Likes (Received)
    40
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    No way! She absolutely denies it. Faith even says she did not know Tupac was signed to death row, she only realised when they pulled up outside.

    According to Faith he got really nasty when she asked for her payment.
    Here is a bit about it.
    http://www.ballerstatus.com/2008/08/...autobiography/
    Last edited by Mug_Life; 05-26-2017 at 07:01 AM.

  4. #4
    Born 2 Revolutionise Executive Director Krizzle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Space
    Posts
    15,159
    Than/ks (Given)
    323
    Than/ks (Received)
    550
    Likes (Given)
    1649
    Likes (Received)
    873
    Dislikes (Given)
    4
    Dislikes (Received)
    3
    Mentioned
    281 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mug_Life View Post
    No way! She absolutely denies it. Faith even says she did not know Tupac was signed to death row, she only realised when they pulled up outside.

    According to Faith he got really nasty when she asked for her payment.
    Here is a bit about it.
    http://www.ballerstatus.com/2008/08/...autobiography/
    I'm certain it happened.. Faith has had so many conflicting stories..

    Quote Originally Posted by joshm662 View Post
    This bitch has had so many different stories... why anyone would believe her dumb ass is beyond me...

    in that 1996 interview she did she said she was never in the studio with Pac or anywhere near him, ever! and then this bitch said she did some vocals for another group and they just ended up using it for a Pac song without her having any idea about it. And then, in her book, she claimed she went to his hotel room to collect the check and he tried to put his hands on her...

    ....now in 2014 she was in the studio with him and put her vocals down and just wanted to collect her $$$ and get the the fuck out of there once she realized it was a Death Row studio... this bitch has told this story in 4 different ways.. you can't believe shit that she says... I've always believed Pac to be a honest person. When you see his interview where he says, "You can believe me or not, I'm the one with 5 bullet holes" ----- (I'm paraphrasing because I can't remember word for word what he said, but ya'll know the interview I'm referring to.. it was with Tabitha Soren and Pac had on his white bandana).. I've just always taken him at his word and I believe he did fuck Faith and she was just ashamed and realized she was used as a pawn in Pac's chess game... Pac was 5 steps ahead of everyone and she didn't realize he was fucking her to use it against BIG, so of course she's embarrassed and is trying to make it look like Pac is a liar because he's not here to defend himself... fucking skeezy ass hoe.




    P.S.... my signature isn't showing up.. but check out the Pac tracks I put up for ya'll...

    http://www.makaveli-board.net/showth...-more&p=264182
    http://www.makaveli-board.net/showth...l=1#post264212
    "I mentioned to him (Kastro) about Makaveli Board and he said that Makaveli Board is family to him"

    I can't keep worrying bout the things in my life I can change
    Dear Lord give me the strength to fight the evil in this game
    Ooh I close my eyes and get down on my knees
    Pray to the heavens protect my family
    If I leave that's good enough for me

    -Big K.R.I.T- Good Enough

  5. #5
    2 Corinthians 5:7
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    ...Location...Location...
    Posts
    7,761
    Than/ks (Given)
    664
    Than/ks (Received)
    567
    Likes (Given)
    1077
    Likes (Received)
    1002
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    2
    Mentioned
    95 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Although Ray J may be known more for his sex tape with Kim Kardashian than his music nowadays, he’s been in the music business since his teens.

    Recently, the younger brother of Brandy spoke to Rhapsody.com about his experiences growing up – some involving meeting Hip Hop legends.

    “We walked in one day and Faith was sitting on Pac’s lap while Pac was
    writing a verse. It was like, “What the f*ck is going on?” That was one
    of the craziest sights, dog. Faith was in Pac’s lap. I was like, “What
    the fuck? I know I’m not? Is that? It can’t?” Three weeks later, “Hit
    ‘Em Up” came out. There’s a couple of people that came up out of that
    camp. Bow Wow was in Snoop’s camp. Keyshia Cole was always through
    Death Row in her younger days. I used to see Keyshia all the time in
    there with Pac. I’m not hating on nobody. I got love for Faith. That
    was unbelievable, during the time of the East Coast-West Coast beef.”
    http://hiphopdx.com/news/id.6701/tit...ans-and-b-i-g#
    Jahrama - Ill$tyle Ikonz




    "Finally, be strong in the Lord and in his mighty power. Put on the full armor of God so that you can take your stand against the devils schemes.

    For God has not given us a spirit of fear and timidity, but of power, love and self-discipline.

    Forget about what happened long ago! Don't think about the past. I am creating something new. There it is! Do you see it?"

    The Bible

  6. #6
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    2,436
    Than/ks (Given)
    765
    Than/ks (Received)
    456
    Likes (Given)
    442
    Likes (Received)
    918
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    119 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mug_Life View Post
    I really want to see how they are going to portray the Faith and Tupac situation. If they are shown as sleeping together in the movie Faith will surely sue. As we all know Faith has always vehemently denied sleeping with Tupac. I have read her book and she goes into quite a detailed account of events leading up to, during and after the whole thing.
    I suppose we will never know the truth.
    I believe she slept with Pac, she did it to get back at Biggie for cheating on her. A give away to me is she said she didn't even know Pac was on Death Row, which is total lies.

  7. #7
    Member Mug_Life's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    60
    Than/ks (Given)
    16
    Than/ks (Received)
    21
    Likes (Given)
    24
    Likes (Received)
    40
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Faith's Explanation From Her Book Part 1

    "Somebody here wants to meet you,” Treach said. “Who?” I asked. I was out in LA working, not performing, so most people didn’t know I was in town. “My boy Tupac wants to say what’s up,” Treach said, gesturing to a table behind him. Before I go any farther, let me be absolutely clear on something. Many people have asked me why I wouldn’t peel off in the opposite direction when I heard Tupac’s name. And the answer is simple: There was no need. I didn’t know anything about what label ’Pac was signed to, whom he was cool with, whom he had beef with. I’d heard the rumors that ’Pac believed Big had been involved in the shooting at the studio the year before. But Big had brushed that off, saying he knew ’Pac knew better than to think that. No one told me anything had changed. And if he wanted to meet me —and he obviously knew I was Big’s wife —I assumed there was no beef. Just a few weeks later, I’d find out how wrong I was. But it’s important to understand how quickly things spread. Being introduced by Treach to ’Pac was like a matchstick hitting a pile of dead leaves. And it was going to become an out-of-control wildfire in no time. This was before the era of instant messaging, blogs, two-way pagers, and gossip Web sites that are constantly updated in real time. All I knew about ’Pac was that he’d just been released from prison. Tupac approached me and we shook hands. He looked exactly like he did on television —bald head and thin, round face with heavy-lidded eyes. Almost immediately after we were introduced, a photographer who had been trolling the club for celebrities came up to us and asked us to pose. In the picture, I’m not smiling, and I look high as hell. But although some people have said otherwise, that picture was taken literally seconds after we met. After we exchanged a few pleasantries, Tupac began to compliment me. “I really like your music,” he said. “When I was locked up, I listened to that album every day.” I thanked him and just continued surveying the crowd. Tupac made direct eye contact with me and looked very serious. “I want to do a song with you. I love your sound and I feel like you the only person who can really do it.”I was flattered but not particularly excited about the prospect. Lots of people would approach me about writing or singing for them. But many times, it didn’t work out because of the money. Once I set my price and insisted on being paid immediately, these things often fell through. “You’d have to get clearance from my label to put the song on your album,” I said. “That’s not a problem,” he said. “It’s not going to be cheap,” I told him. “And I need my money up front.” “That’s not a problem, either,” he said. “How much?” I thought about a conversation I’d recently had with Cheryl. I’d told her I was going to start charging people more. I felt like I wasn’t getting what I was worth and I was determined to stand up for myself and do better when negotiating my terms. I could hear her in my head: Now, Faith, you said you charging twenty-five thousand for the next one. And that’s not even a crazy amount! “It’s going to be twenty-five thousand dollars,” I told Tupac. “No problem,” he said. I still didn’t really take it seriously. A lot of people will talk a big game about working together, and then it doesn’t come through. But still, just to be on the safe side, a day or two later I spoke to Big and made sure to run it by him. “I met ’Pac out here,” I told him. “He wants me to do a song with him.” “Oh word?” Big said. “You gonna do it?” “If the money comes through, yeah I’ll do it.” We talked a bit more and that was it. If Big had said Don’t do the song with him or if he had sounded the least bit concerned, all bets would have been off. Maybe Big wasn’t concerned about Tupac just then. Honestly, I don’t think anyone really knew just how buck wild Tupac was gearing up to be. Soon after, I spoke to Mark Pitts and told him that ’Pac had asked me to work on a record with him. Mark was still on the road with Puff and everyone for the tour. He didn’t say much about the opportunity, but he definitely didn’t tell me that I shouldn’t do it. The next day, I got a page from ’Pac and called him back. We had some small talk for a minute. “So what are you working on out here?” he asked. “I did a song on the Waiting to Exhale soundtrack,” I told him. “I’m going to the release party for that.” “Yeah, I’m going to that, too,” he said. “So you still down to do a song with me?” “That’s a possibility.” “I’m gonna get everything approved by my attorney,” Tupac said. The next night was the party for the release of the Waiting to Exhale soundtrack. There was a lot of buzz surrounding the movie and soundtrack, and I was looking forward to supporting the album with my appearance. I took a limo to the party with my friend Nicci, a singer in the group Brownstone. As soon as we pulled up to where the cars were dropping off artists to walk the red carpet, my cell phone rang. “What up, Faith. Where you at?” It was Tupac. I told him I was at a party for the soundtrack. “Word?” he said. “I’m here, too! Where are you?” I looked out the car window, and there he was. He made a beeline for the car, opened up the door, and jumped in the backseat with us. We were already very close to the drop-off spot for the red carpet; we would only be in the car for another minute or two. But I was still very uncomfortable. I wasn’t planning on hanging out with ’Pac. I introduced him to my friend Nicci, and we chatted until it was time to hit the red carpet. When we exited the car, flashbulbs started going off and people in the crowd craned their necks to see who was coming. Tupac was smiling and waving at folks as we walked into the venue. I wasn’t quite as energetic. I wanted to walk up to each person and tell them: I’m not actually with Tupac. He just jumped into my car a few minutes ago. And I met him for the first time yesterday. When we got inside the venue, I found my table and sat down. I was just starting to get comfortable when Tupac slid into a chair next to me and Nicci. He was grinning ear-to-ear and settled back like he was going to sit there for the rest of the night. Now, Tupac seemed cool to me. There was nothing about him, personally, that made me feel uncomfortable. But I was conscious of perception. I was still married to Big. And no matter what we were going through, I was very aware of how I carried myself. So, as ’Pac was sitting in my row, all chummy and friendly, I was very self-conscious, the way I would have been with anyone I’d just met. He didn’t try to kick it to me or make any kind of moves. It was just the way it all looked. I saw Whitney Houston from across the room, and she gave me a look that said Oh word? You’re with him? And my heart sank. At one point, Clive Davis addressed the crowd, introducing the various celebrities who were in attendance. I was subdued and quiet, uncomfortable and uneasy because of Tupac’s presence. “Ladies and gentleman,” said Clive Davis into the microphone. “We have a special guest here tonight —Tupac Shakur!” The crowd cheered and clapped. I was just ready to get out of there. I didn’t like the vibe and I was relieved when the night was over. Until I saw Tupac standing near our limousine at the end of the night. “Where y’all going now?” he asked with a bright smile on his face. “We’re leaving,” I said quickly. “We’re going to a party.” “Where?” he asked. “The Peninsula,” I said. “That’s where I’m staying!” he said. “I’ll catch a ride over there with y’all.” Tupac jumped in the limo and stretched out, making himself comfortable. Now I was definitely feeling weird. Everything in me wanted to say: You don’t belong in this car! This is not right! But I didn’t have any real basis to say that. And it would have been weird if I’d told him to get out. I just didn’t like how it looked on the outside. After the party at the hotel, we hung out a bit more with Tupac and his friends, shared a blunt, and discussed the specifics of my guest appearance. I confirmed with him that he was sending a car for me a few days later to go to the studio. Then I went back to the producer’s house. Right on time a few days later, a car came to Terry Dollars’s house to pick me up. But instead of a livery service and a driver, it was Tupac himself, driving a black convertible Mercedes-Benz with the top down. I was stunned. Why the hell would he pick me up himself —in a convertible no less? At this time, Tupac had enough fame and notoriety that he did not need to be driving around Los Angeles in a top-down convertible. At that moment, I wanted to tell him that I would drive to the studio myself in my rental car. But I didn’t. I just got in the car, and we pulled off. I noticed immediately that a black Town Car was following us. From the look of the beefy guys in the backseat, they were security guards. The ride to the studio was about fifteen minutes long. We didn’t talk much. I didn’t like any of it: the convertible, the security behind us, none of it felt right. I decided I would go in, do my part and haul ass out of the studio as soon as possible. We pulled up to a nondescript parking lot in nearby Tarzana, California. I followed Tupac through the doors of an office building. As soon as the doors opened, I saw blood-red carpeting throughout the hallway entrance and a lighted sign that said DEATH ROW RECORDS. I felt the blood rush from my face and I thought I was going to pass out.

  8. #8
    Member Mug_Life's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    60
    Than/ks (Given)
    16
    Than/ks (Received)
    21
    Likes (Given)
    24
    Likes (Received)
    40
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Part 2

    Until that very moment, I had no idea that Tupac had signed to Death Row Records after he was released from prison. He had only been out of jail a few days when we met at the Hollywood Athletic Club. I hadn’t yet heard that Suge Knight had bailed him out of prison in return for signing to the label and immediately recording an album. If I had known that Suge Knight had anything whatsoever to do with Tupac and hiring me as a vocalist, I would never in a million years have agreed to it. It was Suge Knight, not Tupac, who had the reputation at this time. Years ago, I’d heard that he roughed up Andre Harrell during his tenure at Uptown, I’d also heard something about Suge making some guys drink urine. And there was a rumor about him shaking down Vanilla Ice. One thing I did know was that he didn’t like Puff one bit. I remembered all those slick things he’d said at The Source Awards the year before. I knew Suge Knight was someone I didn’t want to do business with. But I didn’t know Tupac was now affiliated with him. I went from concerned to cautious to downright petrified. We walked into the main room of the studio and I saw several Death Row artists, including the rapper Kurupt and his pregnant girlfriend and a female singing group called YNV. In my mind, I was screaming: I don’t belong here! But I had to remain calm. I hated the fact that I hadn’t driven in my own car. I was stuck there and didn’t have the guts to scrap the whole plan and call someone to pick me up. I just stayed focused on the plan: I was going to sing my song, collect my twenty-five grand, and be out of there. I got a Budweiser and Tupac rolled a blunt. I chilled out, waiting for the session to begin. Before long, Suge Knight came in and made a beeline to where I was sitting. “It’s nice to meet you, Faith,” he said with a smile. I smiled back and shook his hand. “I’ve heard a lot of nice things about you,” he said. I just smiled and nodded. In that moment, I just wanted to sing the song and leave. I waited for hours as Tupac finished up other songs. I moved around the studio, trying to be sociable. But inside, I felt very self-conscious. Everyone there was from LA and on Death Row and here I am, from the East Coast, an artist signed to Bad Boy? I know people must have been looking at me like I was crazy, considering how Suge felt about Puffy at the time. Three hours passed before Tupac finally called me into the studio. It was crammed with people. I asked him to roll me a blunt and smoked it just to get over the nervousness. I knew I would be able to get into the booth and do whatever I needed to do. They played the song for me. And the title was: “Wonder Why They Call U Bitch.” If I could have felt any more uncomfortable at that point, I did when I heard the title. And then, on top of everything else, the song just wasn’t really that good. Let’s recap how bad this situation is. I’m in LA, writing and recording, instead of on tour with my husband and the rest of the Bad Boy label. I’ve met Tupac in a club and had my picture taken with him (while I am coincidentally wearing a red suit). Then it looks like we arrive and leave together from a soundtrack party. He picks me up in a freaking convertible and drives me to the Can Am Studios, home of Death Row Records. Suge Knight, Puff’s archnemesis, is there. And I am there to sing a song called “Wonder Why They Call U Bitch.” I’m surprised I didn’t just implode right there in the vocal booth. But I didn’t. Somehow, I held it together and sang the one or two lines they wanted me to do. In less than an hour, I was done. A few hours later, Tupac was done with his session, and he led me to a waiting limo in the parking lot. “Where’s my check?” I asked. “My manager is bringing it to my hotel right now,” he said. “I can bring it to you later on this evening. Or we can swing by there right now and pick it up.” I had plenty of experience with people saying they would bring money by at some later time. I wasn’t having that. I wanted my check immediately. I agreed to ride with him to the Peninsula Hotel where he was staying. And of course, when we got there, no manager was in sight. There were two dudes in ’Pac’s room, smoking, drinking, and listening to music. After an hour of waiting for the manager, I was ready to leave. “I’ll just come back and get the check tomorrow,” I said. “Nah, just wait a minute. He’s on his way.” Tupac said. His two friends left. We were now in his hotel room —alone. And it seemed I had been there forever. I was a little uncomfortable and a bit leery. I wanted my money. And then I wouldn’t care if I never saw Tupac Shakur again. As soon as the door closed behind his friends, Tupac turned to me. His face was completely different. His teeth were clenched, his nostrils were flared, and his eyes were narrow. “You know, I love New York,” he said. “But I’m not fucking with New York right now.” The air in the room seemed to get really thick all of a sudden. His demeanor had changed so quickly that I was truly afraid. “Really?” I asked. “Why is that?” “’ Cause niggas set me up that night. You know that, right?” I swallowed hard and took a deep breath. He was staring at me like he thought I was the one who set him up. “You don’t really believe that bullshit,” I said. “I’m telling you . . . niggas set me up,” he said in a low voice. “Look. ’Pac. I just need to get my check and then I have to go . . .” “The situation with the money is like this,” he said. “If I give it to you, then you my bitch.” “Your what,” I said. I felt a chill go up my back. “You heard me. You gotta be my bitch.” I got up and moved farther away from where he was standing. “I’m not anybody’s bitch,” I said, trying to keep my voice even and steady. “You Biggie’s bitch.” I thought about how people always got shit wrong. He was probably thinking about the song “Me & My Bitch.” And I wasn’t with Big when he made that record. “I’m his wife.” “I thought y’all broke up?” he asked. “We still married.” “Whatever.” “Look,” I said. “You hired me to do a song. I did it. I want my money and that’s it.” “Oh word, it’s like that? You just want your money?” “You told me it wouldn’t be a problem,” I said. “The only reason why I came up here is because you said —” “So you not trying to suck my dick?” “What!” I screamed. “What are you talking about?” Tupac raised his voice. “You know you want to suck my dick, bitch! Don’t fucking lie.” I burst into tears and grabbed my purse. “I have to get out of here.” Tupac kept going. He was making no sense, cursing and yelling. He said something about Big and the East Coast. “But . . . but . . . I . . . thought y’all was friends,” I said. At this point, I could barely speak clearly because I was crying so hard. “Whatever. You know you wanna be my bitch,” he said, before going into the bedroom area and slamming the door. As soon as I got my things together to leave, Tupac came back out to the common area. “Where the fuck you going?” he asked. “I don’t know what you thought,” I said. “I really don’t. But it’s not like that.” Tupac just nodded slowly, staring at me intently. He wasn’t ranting and screaming anymore. But he had this very sinister smile on his face. I kept looking around the room because I felt like something was about to happen to me. I wasn’t sure if those guys were coming back or what. But something was wrong. “It’s not like that?” he kept saying over and over and nodding. “Well, ai-ight then, fucking bitch. You want to leave? Tell the driver to take you home. The limo is still out there. Get the fuck out.” I dashed down to the lobby and called my friend Toni. I was crying and told her I was on my way to her house and that I would explain everything when I got there. I got into the limo and cried even harder. And I cried all the way to Toni’s house. I told her everything that had happened. “What are you going to do now?” she asked me. “I have no idea,” I said. “But I know I gotta get that check.” “Just forget about it!” she said. “That dude is nuts.” “Are you crazy?” I yelled. “I gotta get that check. Especially after this bullshit. I can’t let them know I went into the studio with this dude and didn’t even get paid!” “So what are you going to do?” she asked me. “I don’t know,” I said. “I just know I have to get that check.” I spent the night at Toni’s house. And the next morning, I went back to the producer’s house in Sherman Oaks. I was sick with worry. I did not want Puff or Mark or Big to know that I’d worked in the studio with Tupac and not gotten my money. And my mind was reeling over how ’Pac had flipped on me. I decided I would call ’Pac and let him know I was not going to just forget about the money. Even though I had no idea that no dollar amount would change the drama that was about to come. That day, I called him up. “I want my money,” I said. “I did what I was hired to do. And I want to be paid.” “No problem,” Tupac said. “I got that.” His voice was very flat and even. “I need to get the money today,” I said. “Cool. Come by the hotel.” “I’ll be in the hotel lobby at six,” I said. I got my friend Curtis to drive me to the hotel. He dropped me off and told me he would be back to pick me up in thirty minutes. I called Tupac’s room from the lobby and told him I was at the bar. Twenty minutes later, still no Tupac. I called again and he answered. “Oh, so you trying to be funny?” I said. I felt bold enough to tell him how I really felt since I was on the phone and not in person. “I did the song. And now you not trying to pay me? What are you doing? Why are you doing this?” Tupac didn’t say much. He sounded very vague and distracted. I think he was surprised that I actually came back to get the money. I think he thought he’d scared me enough that I wouldn’t dare try to get my money back. “I’m still down here,” I said. “And I want my money.” He never came down. My boy Curtis pulled up to the front of the hotel, where I stood crying. I got in the car and we left. I was going to have to take that on the chin. I was hurt, embarrassed, angry, and ashamed. Now this song that I’d worked on was out there. He could use it for anything. And I wouldn’t even have the benefit of a check to justify why the hell I would work with Tupac. I realized at that point that Tupac had played me out. But I had no idea how far he would take our brief interactions and what lengths he would go to in an effort to make me look bad. I knew it was time to get out of LA. I felt a deep foreboding sense that things were about to get really complicated. Things were about to explode in my face. Tupac was on some bullshit, and if he was capable of flipping on me like that, there was no telling what else he had planned. I was going to have to get ready to defend myself. And the first thing I had to do was talk to my husband.

  9. #9
    Member Mug_Life's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    60
    Than/ks (Given)
    16
    Than/ks (Received)
    21
    Likes (Given)
    24
    Likes (Received)
    40
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    If you want me to post the next chapter when it all hits the fan then just let me know, assuming of course that it's ok for me to post all of this?

  10. #10
    Born 2 Revolutionise Executive Director Krizzle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Space
    Posts
    15,159
    Than/ks (Given)
    323
    Than/ks (Received)
    550
    Likes (Given)
    1649
    Likes (Received)
    873
    Dislikes (Given)
    4
    Dislikes (Received)
    3
    Mentioned
    281 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mug_Life View Post
    If you want me to post the next chapter when it all hits the fan then just let me know, assuming of course that it's ok for me to post all of this?
    Of course it is.. Post away. Gonna post this up on social media later
    "I mentioned to him (Kastro) about Makaveli Board and he said that Makaveli Board is family to him"

    I can't keep worrying bout the things in my life I can change
    Dear Lord give me the strength to fight the evil in this game
    Ooh I close my eyes and get down on my knees
    Pray to the heavens protect my family
    If I leave that's good enough for me

    -Big K.R.I.T- Good Enough

  11. #11
    Member Mug_Life's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    60
    Than/ks (Given)
    16
    Than/ks (Received)
    21
    Likes (Given)
    24
    Likes (Received)
    40
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Part 3

    I told the producer guy that I was going to be finishing up and needed to be paid for my work. He kept stalling me, and I couldn’t wait. I left for New York and decided I would deal with him and getting my money later. Soon after I got back to New York, I got a call from a girl named Jennifer, who worked at Bad Boy. “Yo. Have you heard? Big is pissed off. Him and Puff are wilding out right now.” “Wait a second,” I said. “Why is Big mad?” “Someone told him that people were saying you were messing with ’Pac.” I took a deep breath. “But I wasn’t! Who told him that?” “Look, I just wanted you to know you’ll probably be hearing from Big soon,” she said before hanging up. I had checked into a hotel, so I wasn’t sure if Big knew how to reach me if he did have something to say. Within hours, he called my hotel room. “What the fuck is going on?” he screamed. “Listen, I don’t know what you heard but —” “You fucking with Tupac?” “Hell no,” I yelled. “I told you I did a song with him.” “And then what happened?” he asked. “Nothing! I swear to God nothing happened.” “Faye! Don’t fucking lie to me! Why are people saying this shit?” “I don’t know, Big. But you know I would never —” Big hung up on me. I paced the hotel room for a while, trying to gather my thoughts. I had to think of how I would reassure Big that nothing happened with ’Pac. I hadn’t been completely innocent. While I was in Los Angeles, I’d had sex occasionally with Terry Dollars. And I’d even seen Roger, the NBA player, a few times when he was in town. So technically, I had cheated on Big. But not with Tupac. I had no idea what he had heard and from whom. I just knew that he was very angry. I took a shower to clear my head. I got out, wrapped myself in a towel, and was about to get dressed when I heard banging at my door. I knew it was Big. As soon as I opened up the door a tiny crack, he barreled through. Big grabbed me by my shoulders and shook me. “What the fuck is wrong with you? You fucked Tupac?” I tried to break free from him and started crying. “Hell no!” I said. “You have to believe me!” Big’s friend Damion had come with him. He was standing in a corner of the room. “Damion,” I screamed. “Please tell me what’s going on.” Damion didn’t say anything. But I knew from the look on his face that he knew I didn’t deserve this. “So why is this nigga saying this shit? Huh, Faye? Why?” Big pushed me to the floor, and I covered my head with my arms while he continued to scream and curse at me. After ten minutes, it was over. He stormed out, leaving me on the floor sobbing and hysterical. A few days later, I saw what had made Big so angry. Suge Knight was on the cover of the New York Times Magazine. In the story, Suge urges ’Pac to tell the reporter the name of the person who bought the outfit he’s wearing. “The wife of a top rapper bought this for him,” Suge says, razzing Tupac. “Who’s that?” Tupac smiles. “His name is an acronym.” Suge smiles. “Notorious B.I.G.’ s wife, Faith Evans.” I read this line and almost screamed in frustration. It was a straight-up bald-faced lie. I hadn’t gone anywhere with Tupac. I met him at the club and then saw him at the afterparty for the Waiting to Exhale soundtrack. I worked with him in the studio and tried to get my money back at the Peninsula Hotel. Everything else was bullshit. I continued to read in a blind rage. “She bought him this and a suit and some other stuff,” Suge says. “And how did you thank her, Tupac?” Tupac pauses. “I did enough,” he says, rather salaciously. I could not believe what I was reading. I had never been lied on so openly before in my life. I thought I had developed a pretty thick skin at that point. I’d been called a gold digger by people who thought I married Big because of who he was. There was all the chatter about whether or not me and Mary had beef or whether or not I had beef with Lil’ Kim. But nothing made me more enraged than reading the lies Tupac and Suge were saying about me. I was more than angry. I was afraid, too. I heard that people in the Bad Boy family were being threatened. Anonymous people were calling Big’s house in Teaneck and saying stuff about Tupac and then hanging up on Big. The more people talked about Tupac alluding to having sex with me, the more I feared that his taunting would lead to violence between the two camps. Looking back, that’s why he’d wanted me on the song in the first place. And I’d been clueless enough to walk right into the trap. Everything was on fire now: DJs on radio stations, the hip-hop media, mainstream outlets. Everyone was talking about what ’Pac was saying about me and wondering whether or not it was true. I could not understand how ’Pac was getting away with this. How could he just lie on me to journalists? Wasn’t this against the law? I went to see Stuart Levy, my longtime attorney, and told him I wanted to sue Tupac for libel and defamation of character. “You know,” he told me, “they say any publicity is good publicity.” “Not in this case,” I said. “This could cause some serious shit to go down. I need him to stop talking about me.” “Do you really want to spend your money on this?” he asked. “It will be very expensive.” “I don’t care. I want to do it.” “Keep in mind,” he said, “this will take a lot of time and money. And you’ll have to speak on everything you said and heard while you were out there.” I had to just leave it alone. By suing them, I’d only ended up opening myself and everyone else to more scrutiny. I called Big after giving him some time to cool off and think rationally. “I swear on my life that nothing happened with that nigga,” I told Big. “I don’t understand why he would be saying this shit, Faye,” Big said. “I didn’t even know ’Pac was on Death Row until I got to the studio.” Big listened to me. But I could tell he was still angry and wasn’t sure what to believe. I refused to go into hiding although part of me wanted to. I didn’t do any interviews, but I was still doing studio sessions and writing songs. I knew everyone in the music industry was talking about me, and I wasn’t dealing with any of that bullshit. The one thing that really hurt me during this time was the idea that Big might really believe ’Pac’s lies. At this point, Big and I were pretty much over. Although we lived separately, he still referred to me as his wife, and we always stayed in touch. We even had our occasional hookups. I still felt very strongly for him, and it would kill me if he thought for even one second that I would betray him like that. But then in some ways, I was confused about why no one warned me about ’Pac. Before I was in LA, something was brewing. I didn’t know that ’Pac was signed to Death Row and was running with Suge. And no one told me. If I’d had any suspicions, things would have turned out differently.

  12. #12
    Member Mug_Life's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    60
    Than/ks (Given)
    16
    Than/ks (Received)
    21
    Likes (Given)
    24
    Likes (Received)
    40
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    These are bits from the rest of Faith's book where Tupac is mentioned......

    A few days after we got back to New York, Big and Cease came by my apartment and I ended up giving them a ride to the studio. Big was his usual jovial self, cracking jokes and laughing with Cease. “Faye, I got a new song I want you to hear,” he said. I pointed at the cassette player in my truck. Big dug a tape out of his pocket and slipped it in. His instantly recognizable raspy voice boomed out of my speakers. As usual, Big’s lyrics were amazingly vivid. The song went back and forth with verses from a new rapper named Jay-Z. The two of them were in character, trading lyrics on how gangster they could be. I liked the song and told Big so. “That’s gon’ be on Jay-Z’s new album,” he told me. “That nigga is nice.” I didn’t think about the song again until a few weeks later, when I got a call from Cheryl. “Have you heard Big’s new song?” she asked me. “Which one?” “The one with Jay-Z.” “Yeah,” I told Cheryl. “I heard it awhile ago . . . why?” “You must not have heard this version,” she said. “’ Cause this nigga is wildin’.” I don’t know what happened in the studio between
    the time Big played the song for me and when the album was released. But when I finally heard the song on the radio, my mouth dropped when I heard the last line of Big’s verse. If Faye have twins, she’ll probably have two ’Pacs Get it? Tupac’s . . . I called Cheryl after I heard the song. “Why would he do this?” “I don’t know,” she said. “But that shit is fucked up.” Cheryl had always been right there when me and Big were going through something, and she usually would try to avoid choosing sides or getting in the middle. But this was too much, even for her. “I can’t believe Big would do this,” she said. “It’s just wrong.” Not only was the media having a field day with Tupac’s allegations —now Big was publicly recording a song that speculated the same damn thing? I was so angry I couldn’t even see straight. Big knew it was his baby. And he knew —at least I think he did —that I had not been intimate with Tupac. And this verse wasn’t a freestyle or a remix. It was on an album that would be out there in the world forever. What did he think I was going to say to our child about this song when the time came? I thought it was selfish and immature, and it really pissed me off that he would say such a thing. I didn’t immediately try to reach out to Big to talk to him about it. And before I could even curse him out about it, I heard Tupac’s latest single, a song called “Hit ’Em Up,” which was released just a few weeks before Jay-Z’s Reasonable Doubt. The song used the same sample as Junior M.A.F.I.A.’ s song “Get Money” —the track that people thought Big was using to dis me the year before. This time, it was Tupac fueling the flames. The opening line of the song is Tupac screaming. He taunted Big, claiming he slept with me, in very crude terms. It’s hard to describe just how deflated this made me feel. It was as if my life had been reduced to a punch line. And I did not deserve it. I tried to keep a stiff upper lip but it was so hard.

    After the Summer Jam show, my friend Toni and I went to a nearby hotel to hang out with Queen Latifah, who’d invited us to stop by. Outside the hotel, a fan walked by and stopped when he saw me talking to Toni. “Yo, Faith!” I turned around, ready to give a smile or sign an autograph. “Is that Big’s baby or Tupac’s baby?” I cocked my head to the side and rolled my eyes. “You don’t know me like that,” I said. “Why would you even ask me some disrespectful shit like that?” Things were getting really out of control. When random strangers on the street felt like they could question the paternity of my unborn child, I knew things had gone way too far.
    A few days before I left for Los Angeles, I got a call from B.I.G. “Yo, you heard?” I was immediately on edge. Big sounded shaken up, and that was unusual for him. “Heard what?” I asked. “What’s wrong?” “Tupac got shot out in Vegas.” I didn’tknow what to say. Of course I had nothing good to say about Tupac, though I knew he had once been a good friend of Big’s. But Big seemed more worried about safety. “You think something’s gonna happen out there?” I asked. “I don’t know, Faye,” he said. “But this shit is fucked up.” I could tell that Big was crying through the phone, and that shook me up even more. That wasn’t Big’s style. So I knew things were really getting serious. I turned on the television and watched the reports of ’Pac’s shooting in Las Vegas. On every channel, the newscasters were saying the same thing: The rapper is expected to survive.

    I came home from Los Angeles and heard the news that rocked everyone to the core. Tupac was dead. I was shocked like everyone else. All the reports had kept saying he was expected to live. And he didn’t. At this point, everyone started freaking out. Who killed ’Pac? No one knew. Or no one was saying anything. Why was he killed? Collectively, the entire West Coast whipped their necks and started pointing fingers at the East. Big and Puff were beefing with Tupac when he was killed. There were all kinds of rumors about me having a relationship with ’Pac, which some people were saying would give someone a motive. It was just an awful mess. I can’t say I was mourning Tupac’s death. I knew it was an unfortunate thing. But this was someone who’d lied on me publicly and had so many people looking at me crazy. It was hard for me to feel what everyone else was feeling. I did feel for Big. He seemed shell-shocked about the whole thing. “Something ain’t right, Faye,” Big told me. “I know. What’s going to happen?” “I don’t know all that,” he said. His voice was low and small. “But something is not right, Faye. That was my nigga right there. Shit got fucked up somewhere along the way. But that was my nigga.”

  13. #13
    Sudanese Member Blaze's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Somewhere on this piece of rock.
    Posts
    1,634
    Than/ks (Given)
    14
    Than/ks (Received)
    1
    Likes (Given)
    8
    Likes (Received)
    4
    Dislikes (Given)
    0
    Dislikes (Received)
    0
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I hate to say this,and I hate the fact that there might be some truth in what Faith is saying,but if what she'd said about what Tupac had done to her was true..or even if not entirely true..it would make Tupac nothing more than a douchebag who would fall right out of my ears(his music),my mind(his sayings),and my heart(his legacy)..there is no justifying such actions,whatsoever.

    "So you run and you run to catch up with the sun,but it's sinking
    Racing around to come up behind you again
    Sun is the same -in a relative way- but you're older
    Shorter of breath,and one day closer to death"

Similar Threads

  1. How many songs with Faith Evans?
    By ez0429 in forum Makaveli Discussions
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 09-24-2011, 04:40 PM
  2. Faith Evans
    By Elion in forum 2Pac Photo's
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-17-2011, 01:34 PM
  3. New Faith Evans
    By Krizzle in forum Discussions
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-03-2010, 07:47 AM
  4. New Faith Evans Ft Snoop
    By Krizzle in forum Makaveli Affiliates
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-11-2010, 08:53 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •